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    (Original post by Liverpool F.C.™)
    Did you mean share the diagrams ? Because I can't see anything. :o:
    No I mean share as in share the fact I am drawing said diagrams. Tbh, they're probably not tsr worthy.

    And i have no idea as to how you upload pictures on tsr.
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    No I mean share as in share the fact I am drawing said diagrams. Tbh, they're probably not tsr worthy.

    And i have no idea as to how you upload pictures on tsr.
    Oh right, It's up to you If you don't want to.

    Just in case you change your mind :p: it's quite simple. You could either upload it to an image hosting site like TinyPic then use the Image URL provided and put it in the image tags [IMG]*[/IMG] using the 'Insert Image' button in the editor above ^ or you could attach it into the post using the 'Manage attachments' button at the bottom when you make your post.
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    Hii,

    I'm stuck on the whole homeobox genes and body plans, with the Drosophila thing, Can someone please explain all that.
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    (Original post by I Have No Imagination)
    Hii,

    I'm stuck on the whole homeobox genes and body plans, with the Drosophila thing, Can someone please explain all that.
    Basically, homeobox genes are genes that look after how segmented animals develop. So with the Drosophila fly, it has different homeobox genes to make sure that each segement is in the right place and the right way round etc.

    Maternal- effect genes determine the embryo's polarity, so which end is the head, and which end is the tail. Segmentation genes specify the polarity of each segment. Homeotic selector genes specify the identity of each individual segment (i.e. in the Drosophila, whether one segment will be A1 or A2, for example).

    Homeobox genes each contain a sequence of around 180 base pairs (so produce proteins around 60 amino acids long). Some (called transcription factors) bind to genes further along the DNA (upstream) and initiate transcription, thus regulating the expression on other genes. The homeobox genes are arranged in to clusters called Hox clusters.

    Homeobox genes specify the indentities and fates of embryonic cells and development of body plan. Morphogens are substances that govern the pattern of tissue development e.g. retinoic acid.

    Hope this helps .
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    (Original post by 94_confessions)
    Basically, homeobox genes are genes that look after how segmented animals develop. So with the Drosophila fly, it has different homeobox genes to make sure that each segement is in the right place and the right way round etc.

    Maternal- effect genes determine the embryo's polarity, so which end is the head, and which end is the tail. Segmentation genes specify the polarity of each segment. Homeotic selector genes specify the identity of each individual segment (i.e. in the Drosophila, whether one segment will be A1 or A2, for example).

    Homeobox genes each contain a sequence of around 180 base pairs (so produce proteins around 60 amino acids long). Some (called transcription factors) bind to genes further along the DNA (upstream) and initiate transcription, thus regulating the expression on other genes. The homeobox genes are arranged in to clusters called Hox clusters.

    Homeobox genes specify the indentities and fates of embryonic cells and development of body plan. Morphogens are substances that govern the pattern of tissue development e.g. retinoic acid.

    Hope this helps .
    i will rep+ you tomorow
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    Hey, I've got a couple of questions, rep for the best answer

    1) Explain how cloning an animal can help save an endangered species of mammal?

    2) State three ways of setting up a gene bank for the species being cloned?

    Answers ASAP (i.e. tonight) please
    I have the answers if you still want them :').
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    (Original post by 94_confessions)
    Basically, homeobox genes are genes that look after how segmented animals develop. So with the Drosophila fly, it has different homeobox genes to make sure that each segement is in the right place and the right way round etc.

    Maternal- effect genes determine the embryo's polarity, so which end is the head, and which end is the tail. Segmentation genes specify the polarity of each segment. Homeotic selector genes specify the identity of each individual segment (i.e. in the Drosophila, whether one segment will be A1 or A2, for example).

    Homeobox genes each contain a sequence of around 180 base pairs (so produce proteins around 60 amino acids long). Some (called transcription factors) bind to genes further along the DNA (upstream) and initiate transcription, thus regulating the expression on other genes. The homeobox genes are arranged in to clusters called Hox clusters.

    Homeobox genes specify the indentities and fates of embryonic cells and development of body plan. Morphogens are substances that govern the pattern of tissue development e.g. retinoic acid.

    Hope this helps .
    Thanks a lot for this.
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    (Original post by 94_confessions)
    Basically, homeobox genes are genes that look after how segmented animals develop. So with the Drosophila fly, it has different homeobox genes to make sure that each segement is in the right place and the right way round etc.

    Maternal- effect genes determine the embryo's polarity, so which end is the head, and which end is the tail. Segmentation genes specify the polarity of each segment. Homeotic selector genes specify the identity of each individual segment (i.e. in the Drosophila, whether one segment will be A1 or A2, for example).

    Homeobox genes each contain a sequence of around 180 base pairs (so produce proteins around 60 amino acids long). Some (called transcription factors) bind to genes further along the DNA (upstream) and initiate transcription, thus regulating the expression on other genes. The homeobox genes are arranged in to clusters called Hox clusters.

    Homeobox genes specify the indentities and fates of embryonic cells and development of body plan. Morphogens are substances that govern the pattern of tissue development e.g. retinoic acid.

    Hope this helps .
    Danke.:cool:
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    (Original post by 94_confessions)
    Basically, homeobox genes are genes that look after how segmented animals develop. So with the Drosophila fly, it has different homeobox genes to make sure that each segement is in the right place and the right way round etc.

    Maternal- effect genes determine the embryo's polarity, so which end is the head, and which end is the tail. Segmentation genes specify the polarity of each segment. Homeotic selector genes specify the identity of each individual segment (i.e. in the Drosophila, whether one segment will be A1 or A2, for example).

    Homeobox genes each contain a sequence of around 180 base pairs (so produce proteins around 60 amino acids long). Some (called transcription factors) bind to genes further along the DNA (upstream) and initiate transcription, thus regulating the expression on other genes. The homeobox genes are arranged in to clusters called Hox clusters.

    Homeobox genes specify the indentities and fates of embryonic cells and development of body plan. Morphogens are substances that govern the pattern of tissue development e.g. retinoic acid.

    Hope this helps .
    Thank you, that was so clear. +Rep.
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    (Original post by 94_confessions)
    I have the answers if you still want them :').
    Ahhh no I'm okay thanks, we went through it in class
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    I'm glad to have helped .
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    what is meant by vegetative propagation? AND

    Can someone explain this for me, "Describe the production of natural clones in plants using the example of vegetative propagation in elm trees."
    and are there other examples of plants other than elm trees?
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    i have a test on cellular control tomorrow
    faillllllllllllllll
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    Kool Everyone, Finished Cellular Control And Meiosis, Now We multiple alleles and linkage. I found it quite boring so Im slightly confused about this topic. Anyone got any good notes and questions so we can start on it now. My teacher is killing me with all these monohybrid crosses. Its not in the spec but apparently without knowing it impossible to understand the upcoming topics.
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    Got my a2 coursework marks back and its exactly the same mark as last year .....strange. Got 33 out of 40 which is an A but i got marked down last year down to a C so do you guys think i should resit to get higher marks just incase.??????
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    Ahh couldn't face this thread over half term! Once again everyone is talking about things I have no idea about lol. No suprise there How's everyone getting on?

    Remarqable M.. get your bank account sorted?! :P
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    (Original post by MG.GULED)
    Got my a2 coursework marks back and its exactly the same mark as last year .....strange. Got 33 out of 40 which is an A but i got marked down last year down to a C so do you guys think i should resit to get higher marks just incase.??????
    Lucky you.. all i got was 10/40 anyways gonna redo it again. Sad thing is i cant redo my AS practicals...i dont think we are allowed to.Damn it.
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    (Original post by Tinkerbelle ♥)
    Ahh couldn't face this thread over half term! Once again everyone is talking about things I have no idea about lol. No suprise there How's everyone getting on?

    Remarqable M.. get your bank account sorted?! :P
    Yh i've already sorted out my student bank account:p: i decided i'll just stick with HSBC because halifax is a bit risky preposition they make false promises e.g. £3000 overdraft limit when no one rarely gets the full overdraft limit
    lol you right me neither didn't have the backbone to face this thread i was completely cluelesss(As the thread starter I am embarassed to say the least), but im startin to get hang of it.
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    (Original post by Remarqable M)
    what is meant by vegetative propagation? AND

    Can someone explain this for me, "Describe the production of natural clones in plants using the example of vegetative propagation in elm trees."
    and are there other examples of plants other than elm trees?
    Vegetative propagation is when an organism produces psecial structures that grow in to new organisms. Therefore the offspring are genetically identical to the parent (clones).

    In the case of the English elm, the plants are specially adapted to perform asexual reproduction (natural vegetative propagation) when the parent plant becomes damaged i.e. through burning or disease (Dutch elm disease), meaning the species can survive such catastrophes.

    When the elm becomes damaged/diseased, root suckers called basal sprouts appear within 2 months of the damage to the parent tree's main trunk. This new growth of elms is called a clonal patch. The basal sprouts grow from the meristem tissue (undifferentiated cells) from the very bottom of the trunk, where it is likely to have suffered the least damage. Then once the main tree dies, the root suckers continue to grow, however, as they are genetically identical to the parent tree, if the parent tree died from Dutch elm disease they will to be affected by it when they grow older.

    English elm trees are the only example we need to know for the exam, but this is very similar to when strawberry plants grow runners (stolons) and reproduce.

    Hope this helps .
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    (Original post by 94_confessions)
    Vegetative propagation is when an organism produces psecial structures that grow in to new organisms. Therefore the offspring are genetically identical to the parent (clones).

    In the case of the English elm, the plants are specially adapted to perform asexual reproduction (natural vegetative propagation) when the parent plant becomes damaged i.e. through burning or disease (Dutch elm disease), meaning the species can survive such catastrophes.

    When the elm becomes damaged/diseased, root suckers called basal sprouts appear within 2 months of the damage to the parent tree's main trunk. This new growth of elms is called a clonal patch. The basal sprouts grow from the meristem tissue (undifferentiated cells) from the very bottom of the trunk, where it is likely to have suffered the least damage. Then once the main tree dies, the root suckers continue to grow, however, as they are genetically identical to the parent tree, if the parent tree died from Dutch elm disease they will to be affected by it when they grow older.

    English elm trees are the only example we need to know for the exam, but this is very similar to when strawberry plants grow runners (stolons) and reproduce.

    Hope this helps .
    Thank you so much! I'll rep+ you again in a month's time:cool:
 
 
 
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