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    A few pages back someone posted up some really useful sets of questions and answers (with F215 in the title eg. biotechnology and gene tech) - I was just wondering if they had a set for the brain / behaviour as it's the only module for which no questions were posted? Thanks sooo much
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    (Original post by s_a_r_a)
    hii chuck!! glad to see you're back and im sorry about your maths exam..
    emm have you finished the F215 revision cards by any chance?
    yerr nearly done
    im contemplating whether to do the gentics revision cards or not seeing as im pretty solid with that topic myself
    ive posted the bio tech + ecosystem ones and im going to post the plant/animal responses one later tonight
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    (Original post by chuck111)
    finally time to devote my time between biology and chemistry
    maths exams where a complete fail -.-, was better of spending my time revising bio or chem
    This details my predicament exactly ;o;

    I've started from the back, read over muscles and behaviour they seem okay. Might type up some plant hormone note. Will but them up when I eventually get to it (:
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    (Original post by Guinny)
    This details my predicament exactly ;o;

    I've started from the back, read over muscles and behaviour they seem okay. Might type up some plant hormone note. Will but them up when I eventually get to it (:
    Or you could look at this page to help you

    Edit: about two-thirds down the page.
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    (Original post by _lynx_)
    Or you could look at this page to help you

    Edit: about two-thirds down the page.
    Oh my, that is jolly kind of you! (:

    I shall find some other notes to type up... Hmmm, any suggestions?
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    (Original post by chuck111)
    yerr nearly done
    im contemplating whether to do the gentics revision cards or not seeing as im pretty solid with that topic myself
    ive posted the bio tech + ecosystem ones and im going to post the plant/animal responses one later tonight
    hey, where have you posted the bio tech and ecosystem revision cards? i cant find them on http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1289356. thanks
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    Done with Module 1. Now the rest to learn.. :facepalm:
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    (Original post by chuck111)
    yerr nearly done
    im contemplating whether to do the gentics revision cards or not seeing as im pretty solid with that topic myself
    ive posted the bio tech + ecosystem ones and im going to post the plant/animal responses one later tonight
    If you could manage doing the genetic ones then pleaaaaase do because i think thats the hardest topic!!! if not then dont worry about it, already mega thankful to you!!!
    Once again thanks!
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    (Original post by _lynx_)
    .
    Hope you don't mind me changing everything, it was a good base to work on (:


    Now I feel more productive, hurrah! :3
    Attached Images
  1. File Type: pdf Plant growth regulators.pdf (321.4 KB, 885 views)
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    (Original post by Guinny)
    Hope you don't mind me changing everything, it was a good base to work on (:


    Now I feel more productive, hurrah! :3
    It's fine It was only a quick 10 minute job anyway - I'm glad that you've pimped it up :p:
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    Hey could somebody explain the difference between Distribution and Abundance to me? please.
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    (Original post by mikey_g)
    haha nice one, that's alright!
    although i doubt very much they'll be setting these sorta memory test questions. its all about knowledge application these days





    so in response to youu, the stages are as follows


    SEQUENCING ENTIRE GENOMES

    • Genomes are first mapped to identify which part of the genome (e.g. which chromosome) they have come from - location of microsatellites used (repetitive runs of base sequences)
    • Genome sheared (mechanically broken) into smaller fragments - known as the shotgun approach
    • Fragments placed into BACS and transferred to E.coli bacteria. As cells grow in culture, clone libraries are produced (many copies of the genome sections)

    • To sequence a BAC, cells containing specific BACS are taken and cultured. DNA is extracted from the cells and various restriction enzymes cut DNA fragments into different sizes.
    • Fragments separated by size using agarose gel electrophoresis
    • Each fragment is sequenced using an automated process (Chain termination method / or 'the fluorescent nucleotide thing')
    • Computer programmes compare overlapping regions from cuts made by restriction enzymes, in order to reassemble entire BAC, and then BACS are assembled together, forming completed code.


    So you're more or less right, but don't say copies are made using PCR, because whilst CTM is based upon PCR but it's different
    Thanks for that finally making some sense!
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    (Original post by thekooks)
    Hey could somebody explain the difference between Distribution and Abundance to me? please.
    Distribution of a species along a transect is just whether or not that species is present.

    So to record the distribution of dandelions on a roadside, you would just note down whether there are any in your quadrat.

    Abundance is the numbers of individuals of that species along the transect.

    Same method as finding the distribution but this time you count the numbers (or estimate using % cover).
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    can anyone expand this point??
    *explain the significance of the various concepts of the species, with reference to the biological species
    concept and the phylogenetic (cladistic/evolutionary) species concept;
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    (Original post by Nixani)
    can anyone expand this point??
    *explain the significance of the various concepts of the species, with reference to the biological species
    concept and the phylogenetic (cladistic/evolutionary) species concept;
    Biological species concept is defined as: a group of organisms that can interbreed to produce fertile offspring and are reproductively isolated frmo other such groups.

    Places more emphasis on qualitative differences between individuals. The problems occur with this definition because it says if they can breed and a fertile offspring is produced then its one species. Also you may not be able to view them reproducing/takes a long time, as well as you cannot view extinct species and decide if they are related.

    So the phylogenetic species concept is used as well - a group of organisms that are similar in morphology, physiology, embryology and behaviour and occupy the same ecological niche. (Niche = role a species plays in an ecosystem, such as keystone speces)

    This places a great deal of importance on quantitative analysis and objective analysis. I.e. factual analysis/hard evidence.

    It places great emphasis on:
    -DNA and RNA analysis to link the evolutionary relationships and can tell you whats related + how closely
    -Makes no difference between extinct and extant (current living) species
    -Can use computer programs to draw cladograms/clades which display the relationships between species using cladistics. Cladistics = the hierachical classification of species, based on their evolutionary ancestry.

    Clades have two types of groups...
    -Monophaletic clades are clades which display a common/recent ancestor and all the descendant species
    -Paraphaletic clades are clades which display a common/recent ancestor and only certain descendant species, certain clades are excluded.

    So the significance of the two, is that one can utilise the other in order to avoid the problems that can arise when classifying species.
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    why in gorillas it's necessary for all sexually mature males and sexually mature females to leave the social group they were born into?

    is it to avoid conflict? or is it because it places a burden on the group?
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    FINALLY covered everything
    Bring on the question papers :woo:
    heres the plant/animal responses cards,
    seriously did not enjoy this topic lol found it boring and some parts hard to understand
    Attached Files
  2. File Type: doc Plant,Animal Responses.doc (128.0 KB, 489 views)
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    (Original post by Remarqable M)
    why in gorillas it's necessary for all sexually mature males and sexually mature females to leave the social group they were born into?

    is it to avoid conflict? or is it because it places a burden on the group?
    good question
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    (Original post by Remarqable M)
    why in gorillas it's necessary for all sexually mature males and sexually mature females to leave the social group they were born into?

    is it to avoid conflict? or is it because it places a burden on the group?
    Sexually mature males cannot remain in group as it will result in conflict with the dominant male. Only the dominant male is allowed to mate with the mature females. Mature females leave social group because this prevents inbreeding (the mature females are the offspring of the dominant silverback male-so if they bred with this male again, it would lower the gene pool, reducing the allelic frequency, and perhaps increasing genetic problems in that population.
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    (Original post by chuck111)
    FINALLY covered everything
    Bring on the question papers :woo:
    heres the plant/animal responses cards,
    seriously did not enjoy this topic lol found it boring and some parts hard to understand
    You mean everything?! including all the synoptic stuff? :O
    Damn, ive gone over all of F215, and looked over stuff from F212, thanks to your revision cards :P

    (Original post by Remarqable M)
    why in gorillas it's necessary for all sexually mature males and sexually mature females to leave the social group they were born into?

    is it to avoid conflict? or is it because it places a burden on the group?
    I would assume:
    1) To limit group size so the dominant male can help provide enough food and resources for the group
    2) Avoid conflict between males so there is only ever one silverback leading the troop
    3) Females leave the group i guess to reduce interbreeding (which reduces the gene pool, and would cause genetic uniformity + reduce variation) and find their own mate in a troop
 
 
 
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