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    How would you go about answering this question? I think its pretty synoptic linking with unit 1.

    "Mammals also use chemical commmunication systems. These systems allow them to respond to changes in the internal and external environment."

    Compare, using named examples, the features of the chemical communication systems of flowering plants and mammals. (7+1 QWC)
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    Can someone please write down all I need to know about bread wheat ?
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    Explain that the genes that control develpment of body plans are similar in plants, animals and fungi, with reference to homeobox genes?

    could somone maybe please summurise that cus I dont really get it
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    what are the definitions of innnate and learned behaviour.
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    do nitrosomonas and nitrobacter respire aerobically or anaerobically?
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    (Original post by Archen)
    do nitrosomonas and nitrobacter respire aerobically or anaerobically?
    Definately both aerobic, they are involved in nitrification.
    Nitrosomonas oxidise ammonium ions to nitrites
    Nitrobacter oxidise nitrite to nitrates.

    Oxidation needs oxygen.
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    (Original post by TX22)
    what are the definitions of innnate and learned behaviour.
    Innate behaviour are those that are genetically determined and are not learned. All members of the species will respond in exactly the same way to exactly the same stimuli, they are rigid and inflexible behaviours, and also can be thought of as being unintelligent in the sense that the organism doesn't know why it is responding in such as way.

    Learned behaviour- is any behaviour that can change or adapt in response to changes in the environment. This behaviour cannot be passed on by reproduction, it needs to be taught. There are variations in the way members of the same species carry out the response.
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    (Original post by LearningMath)
    Transcription factors are proteins that bind to DNA to either facilitate the binding of RNA polymerase, or to inhibit its binding. So i think it's far clearer to refer to this particular transcription factor as a repressor protein, as there will be plenty of other transcription factors involved which allow RNA polymerase to bind at all!
    Yeah, thats pretty much what I said.
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    (Original post by TX22)
    what are the definitions of innnate and learned behaviour.
    Innate - Is a behaviour that is genetically predetermined, every member of the same species will exhibit the behaviour in the same way. Innate behaviours only require a nervous system not a brain. Examples in humans are gripping, sucking and sweating, in invertebrates it the taxes and kineses.

    Learned - is a behaviour that will vary within it a species and it will change or adapt with experience. Examples in humans are shivering, walking and talking.
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    (Original post by Just-Some-Guy)
    How would you go about answering this question? I think its pretty synoptic linking with unit 1.

    "Mammals also use chemical commmunication systems. These systems allow them to respond to changes in the internal and external environment."

    Compare, using named examples, the features of the chemical communication systems of flowering plants and mammals. (7+1 QWC)
    i'll probably draw a table comparing both chemical communication as well as mentioning the similarities and differences of both system.

    one of the difference between the two system is the fact that mammals employ glands from where the hormones are released where as in plants there is no such thing.
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    (Original post by Remarqable M)
    one of the difference between the two system is the fact that mammals employ glands from where the hormones are released where as in plants there is no such thing.
    also no nervous system in plants.
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    (Original post by Just-Some-Guy)
    How would you go about answering this question? I think its pretty synoptic linking with unit 1.

    "Mammals also use chemical commmunication systems. These systems allow them to respond to changes in the internal and external environment."

    Compare, using named examples, the features of the chemical communication systems of flowering plants and mammals. (7+1 QWC)
    It is vital that both animals and plants respond to changes in both their external and internal environment, as this allows for the survival of the organism to reproductive age so that it is able to reprodcue and pass on its alleles. In animals, both the nervous sytem and the endocrine system are required for the coordination of responses. In animals, chemical communication system refers to the endocrine system which produces hormones-molecules known as chemical messengers, which if secreted from an endocrine glands are released straight into the blood to be trasnported around the body, but if from an exocrine gland, they will be secreted into a duct which then transfers it to its site of use. Hormones are molecules that are specific so will only bind to specific target sites within the body, and only act on these cells. In plants, hormones also regulate responses to the environment, but these are termed growth regulators, again, they are specific and act on only the target tissue that has a complementary receptor site. In plants however, hormones/growth regulators are procuced in a variety of tissues in the plant and not just in endocrine/exocrine glands.
    An example in animals, is that of the pancreas, this is an organ that has both an exocrine and endocrine function. There are 2 types of cells in the pancreas, in the islets of langarhan- alpha cells and beta cells, and these are able to detect changes in blood glucose levels and allow for a response to be carried out. When blood glucose levels are high this will be detected by Beta cells, and they cause for the secretion of insulin, which causes a number of changes in the body to attempt to decrease the blood glucose levels, such as by allowing cells to uptake glucose, and by converting glucose to glycogen.
    In plants, growth in the shoot is controlled by auxins. The prescnce of auxin in the shoot tip means that lights will bend towards a light source if only illuminated from one side, and thus they are positively phototropic.


    This is prob waaaaay too long, but I tend to blab on forever... sorry.
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    (Original post by TX22)
    what are the definitions of innnate and learned behaviour.
    innate - is any behavioural response that occurs without learning. It's genetically determined(so environment has no impact), so can be passed on via reproduction.

    Learned - refers to animal responses that change or adapt with experience. Cannot be passed on to offspring genetically, but can be passed on to offspring through teaching.

    One of the benefits of learned behaviour is that it allows the organism to adapt and change its learned behaviour according to changing circumstances(experience). In order words, its flexible and soft. Learned behaviour is considered intelligent, because it forms the basis for all intelligent activity.
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    (Original post by ViolinGirl)
    This is prob waaaaay too long, but I tend to blab on forever... sorry.
    Wow this is an awesome answer!:woo:
    No need to be sorry, I prefer wrtiting in a lot of detail in an answer, makes me feel like I've covered everything in depth.
    Thanks for the help!
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    (Original post by swirlystar)
    Learned - is a behaviour that will vary within it a species and it will change or adapt with experience. Examples in humans are shivering, walking and talking.
    I have to disagree with the shivering,:confused: im fairly confident its an innate behaviour caused by spontaneous contractions of the muscles, which cant be learned.
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    Can someone expain the brain (2.4.5) to me? Association areas?

    When we did it, we had to learn about the lobes, the hippocampus and other stuff not in the book
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    (Original post by Just-Some-Guy)
    I have to disagree with the shivering,:confused: im fairly confident its an innate behaviour caused by spontaneous contractions of the muscles, which cant be learned.
    No shivering is definitely a learnt behaviour, babies can't shiver as a reaction to a cold environment. My teacher always mentions it because it came up one year on an exam paper and the majority of people got it wrong.
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    (Original post by Just-Some-Guy)
    I have to disagree with the shivering,:confused: im fairly confident its an innate behaviour caused by spontaneous contractions of the muscles, which cant be learned.
    i think it's innate too, for the simple reason that it mimicks the action of a reflex.
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    (Original post by swirlystar)
    No shivering is definitely a learnt behaviour, babies can't shiver as a reaction to a cold environment. My teacher always mentions it because it came up one year on an exam paper and the majority of people got it wrong.
    LOL no. You need a new biology teacher :erm:

    Babies do shiver but not in terms of muscle movement.
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    (Original post by swirlystar)
    No shivering is definitely a learnt behaviour, babies can't shiver as a reaction to a cold environment. My teacher always mentions it because it came up one year on an exam paper and the majority of people got it wrong.
    the shivering reflex is how its defined. It thus must be innate.
 
 
 
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