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    (Original post by noodlecookie)
    Question - for neuromuscular junctions, the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) is broken down by AChE....

    ... Acetylcholinesterase?

    Or did I just make that up?
    no, acetylcholine IS broken down by acetylcholinesterase well done
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    differences between neuromuscular junction and synapse, is this right:

    neuromuscular junction acts between muscle cell and motor neurone whereas a synapse acts between two neurones.

    in neuromuscular junction the post synaptic cell is a muscle cell whereas the post synaptic cell in synapse is a neurone.

    what else
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    (Original post by noodlecookie)
    Question - for neuromuscular junctions, the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) is broken down by AChE....

    ... Acetylcholinesterase?

    Or did I just make that up?
    I spent 5 minutes thinking about that earlier, I'm pretty sure you're right.
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    (Original post by clad in armour)
    they'll dress up something from A2 with AS stuff for example, they might ask you to compare chromosome numbers in stages of meiosis and mitosis and then go on to ask about the process of meiosis
    Yeah, that's what I thought. Phew, I had a bit of a panic there thinking we might have to do a mighty essay or something.
    Back to revision, good luck (everyone)!
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    what are the differences between chromosome numbers in mitosis and meiosis.



    (Original post by clad in armour)
    they'll dress up something from A2 with AS stuff for example, they might ask you to compare chromosome numbers in stages of meiosis and mitosis and then go on to ask about the process of meiosis
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    (Original post by clad in armour)
    I mean sister chromatids as in 2 of them joined at the centromere, theres one chromatid on one side and one on the other of the centromere, how are they identical when theyve got different genes on them?

    im looking at meiosis btw, at prophase1 when crossing over happens
    In meiosis those wouldnt be sister chromatids, they would be a bivalent (homologous pair of chromosomes) at prophase I, however at prophase II you get the chromatids who are identical gene-wise but have different alleles.

    In mitosis the sister chromatids at prophase are identical both with genes and alleles.
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    (Original post by clad in armour)
    could you remind me what happens in mitosis
    Interphase - cell expands, replicates DNA, prepares itself for mitosis. The cell spends most of its time in interphase

    Prophase - nuclear membrane dissolves, chromatin condenses and becomes visible as chromosomes, centrioles move to poles of the cell and start producing spindle fibres.

    Metaphase - spindle fibres attach to the chromosomes and they align along the equator

    Anaphase - chromosomes separate at their centromeres and move to the opposite sides of the cell, spindle fibres shorten

    Telophase - membrane "pinches" in (edit: just found this is called a cleavage furrow, tee-hee), spindle fibres dissolve, chromatin uncoils and becomes invisible under a light microscope, new membranes form around the two new nuclei

    Cytokinesis - membrane pulls apart to create two brand spanking new genetically identical cells
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    mitosis - chromosome number is maintained and in meiosis the chromosome number is halved

    say they ask in the exam what the difference between the chromosome number in mitosis and meiosis
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    (Original post by dopeyangel101)
    no, acetylcholine IS broken down by acetylcholinesterase well done
    :jive:
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    Anyone got any ideas about potential synoptic links?

    I'm thinking mitosis, enzymes, respiration and photosynthesis, action potentials, maybe DNA replication, any other ideas?
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    (Original post by buyingtheticket)
    Agreed. The coursework tasks should be sat in an exam hall after you've done two experiments and teachers shouldn't have access to mark schemes. -.-
    and it makes you wonder why private schools get on average 60/60 >.<
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    enzymes linked to practically everything on immobilised enzymes and conditions in fermenter.
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    arggh so much waffly stuff in this exam
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    i got 36/40, i wonder how many UMS that would be. I hope it goes higher and hoopefully grade boundaries go down.
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    anyone using the Heinemann book, on p156 with somatic cell nuclear transfer, why do you have to put the reconstructed cell in the tired oviduct of one sheep, to then take it out and put it in ANOTHER sheep?
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    well, synapses from unit 1 a2 link to NMJs, enzymes link to everything, brain links to homeostasis in unit 1 a2, conservation links to loads of unit 2 AS and thats all i can think of right now :/
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    can anyone remind about semi conservative replication ??
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    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EdHzK...eature=related

    This is a good animation for anyone struggling to understand muscle contraction.
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    (Original post by dopeyangel101)
    anyone using the Heinemann book, on p156 with somatic cell nuclear transfer, why do you have to put the reconstructed cell in the tired oviduct of one sheep, to then take it out and put it in ANOTHER sheep?
    I'm assuming it's their interpretation of leaving the cell to divide into an embryo (CGP: "egg cell is stimulated to divide into an embryo" - they don't specifically mention where).
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    (Original post by juman786)
    and it makes you wonder why private schools get on average 60/60 >.<
    Makes you wonder why certain people at private schools then struggle in the exams...Oh well they'll be screwed when they go to uni and it's a level playing field.
 
 
 
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