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    (Original post by lewdav)
    The purpose of the ampicillin agar is to identify the bacteria that have actually taken up the plasmid - remember that some won't even take it up. Bacteria that didnt take it up will be annhilated by ampicillin agar, lol. Do you get me?

    Hope I helped.
    Thank you!!

    Sooo..The ampicillin is to determine which ones have plasmids.. then those are put on the tetracycline agar is to determine which ones have picked up the insulin gene? Is that right?! They have to kill the ones they want in order to find out it was those they wanted ? :confused: ahhh
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    teacher wasn't in, and he's not in on fridays so i'ma have to take pictures of each page, put them in a document and then post on here.
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    your a legend dopeyangel101. I've PM'd you for the ecosystems questions!
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    (Original post by Tinkerbelle ♥)
    Thank you!!

    Sooo..The ampicillin is to determine which ones have plasmids.. then those are put on the tetracycline agar is to determine which ones have picked up the insulin gene? Is that right?! They have to kill the ones they want in order to find out it was those they wanted ? :confused: ahhh

    Yes thats it lol, they kill the ones they want. It's like, they want the ones that die second time round. When they see which ones die, they can go back to the original colony and pick out ones from the same area that the ones that died were taken from initially. Make sense?
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    (Original post by lewdav)
    Yes thats it lol, they kill the ones they want. It's like, they want the ones that die second time round. When they see which ones die, they can go back to the original colony and pick out the ones that were taken from the areas of bacterial cells that dies on tetracycline.
    Right I'm with you. It's all clicked Thank you soo much!
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    (Original post by Tinkerbelle ♥)
    Right I'm with you. It's all clicked Thank you soo much!

    Iv'e just edited it to make more sense lol.....no problem.
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    Advantages of germ line therapy:

    carriers of genetic disorders may be able to concieve a baby without it inheriting genetic disorder.
    it could decrease the number of people that suffer from genetic disorders.

    disadvantages of germ line therapy:
    allelle may be overexpressed
    difficult to insert allele into specific cells.
    allele maybe inserted into wrong part of DNA, this could cause cancer etc.

    advantages of somatic gene therapy:

    it could give individuals suffering from genetic disorders a better quality of life
    it could prolong the lives of individuals with genetic disorders

    disadvantages of somatic gene therapy:

    patient may have to undergo multiple treatments
    treatment maybe short - lived

    muscular contraction:

    when an action potential arrives at sarcolemma, the sarcolemma depolarises. The depolarisation spreads down the transverse tubules to the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The sarcoplasmic reticulum released stored calcium ions into sarcoplasm. The calcium ions bind to troponin which causes it to change shape. it pulls the tropomyosin away from the actin - myosin binding site on actin filament. this exposes the binding site and the myosin can bind to actin - myosin binding site on actin filament. This forms an actin - myosin cross bridge.

    power stroke - energy released from ATP moves the myosin head, causing it to bend. This pulls the actin filament along. Then ATP provides energy to break the actin - myosin cross bridge so the myosin head detaches from actin filament. The myosin head re attaches to different binding site along the actin filament. Many actin - myosin cross bridges form and break so this pulls the actin filament along and the sarcomeres get shorter.
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    guys, any module 1 or 3 or 4 question packs anywhere?
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    Anyone else going to find it difficult to recall pages 226 - 227.

    Also!!!!! must we know the SPECIFIC example of succession on page 199????

    this is in the book with the brain on the front.

    thanks guys
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    (Original post by dopeyangel101)
    teacher wasn't in, and he's not in on fridays so i'ma have to take pictures of each page, put them in a document and then post on here.
    :lol: that would take you ages! you know what, forget it, i'll do it:p: not by taking pictures:lol:
    i will post them on here this weekend
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    Hey dopeyangel101 can you please post the genetics questions + answers need them real bad.
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    doing my best, but i'm off til sunday sorry!
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    im having issues with learning the sequence of events for Apoptosis. When it goes "cytoplasm becomes less dense", what does this actually mean?
    by the way ive checked with teachers and ive been told we dont need to know Drosophila development, its just in the book as an example to give us a taste of what they're going on about.
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    The cytoplasm doesn't become less dense, it becomes more dense, as the organelles become more tighly packed within it, more organelles within a smaller volume =more dense.
    The sequence of events are as follows:
    1. Enzymes break down the cell cytoskeleton.
    2. The cytopasm becomes more dense, and organelles are more tightly packed.
    3. The cell surface membrane changes, to form bits called blebs.
    4. The chromatin condenses, and nuclear envelope breaks down, DNA breaks into fragments.
    5. Cell breaks into vesicles, which are uptaken by phagocytosis. The debris is disposed of in a way that does not cause damage to any other cells.
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    thanks violingirl, i get it now!

    is anyone else actually scared that all this revision and memorising of all the processes might come to no use when we open the exam paper? just like in january!
    how is it best to prepare for this?

    thanks
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    (Original post by redfanatic)
    thanks violingirl, i get it now!

    is anyone else actually scared that all this revision and memorising of all the processes might come to no use when we open the exam paper? just like in january!
    how is it best to prepare for this?

    thanks

    Kind of. There's so much to learn so much of my revisions basically going to waste as lots of it won't be on the exam.

    I've heard this will be really synoptic so it'll be slightly different to the January exam.

    For now I'm just worrying about revision. I'm taking notes from the book and it's taking far longer than expected. I'm just finishing module 1 and I've been revising since Monday... Although when I do revise it's only been for a few hours (Like 2 - 3).
    Seeing as almost everything on a spread is relevant it's hard to write out a whole spread into a few sentences so I just end up basically copying out the book..:eek3:

    If I haven't finished all the note taking by midnight on Sunday then I'll just give up the note taking and crack on to past papers.
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    (Original post by MasterJomi)
    Kind of. There's so much to learn so much of my revisions basically going to waste as lots of it won't be on the exam.

    I've heard this will be really synoptic so it'll be slightly different to the January exam.

    For now I'm just worrying about revision. I'm taking notes from the book and it's taking far longer than expected. I'm just finishing module 1 and I've been revising since Monday... Although when I do revise it's only been for a few hours (Like 2 - 3).
    Seeing as almost everything on a spread is relevant it's hard to write out a whole spread into a few sentences so I just end up basically copying out the book..:eek3:

    If I haven't finished all the note taking by midnight on Sunday then I'll just give up the note taking and crack on to past papers.
    This was my problem too!! I went for copying out of the book, then copying out of the revision book (cpg or whatever its called).. then copying it out on little A5 sheets of coloured card. one sheet per 'topic' so been condensing it down to the point where *hopefully* I'll be able to recall everything without cues. :woo:

    Yes. It takes forever.
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    (Original post by Tinkerbelle ♥)
    This was my problem too!! I went for copying out of the book, then copying out of the revision book (cpg or whatever its called).. then copying it out on little A5 sheets of coloured card. one sheet per 'topic' so been condensing it down to the point where *hopefully* I'll be able to recall everything without cues. :woo:

    Yes. It takes forever.
    Wow, copying out the notes again after you've copied out the book.:eek:

    That requires a lot of effort. Effort I just don't seem to have. I can only revise for about 3:30 hours a day max unless it's the day before the exam. I usually burn out after about 3 hours and the last 30 minutes is spent staring at one sentence before realising I've burnt out and I should quit while I'm ahead.
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    ok guys i need some confirmation on INTERPHASE Synthesis stage.

    So at first we have 46 chromosomes in each cell (2n). After the S phase we have 4n = 92 chromosomes. Meiosis I begins and we end up with 2 two cells each containing 46 chromosomes. Meiosis II now begins and we end up with 4 cells each containing 23 chromosomes.

    Im pretty sure im right, but i just wanted to check.
    We obviously wont feel like we have 96 chromosomes in our cell becuase it all happens very very quickly.
    And then after fertilisation 23 + 23 = 46 chromosomes in the fertilised cell.

    Thanks
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    could someone explain replica plating - identifying bacteria that have taken up plasmids but explain simply and clearly. I find it difficult to understand that section.
 
 
 
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