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    (Original post by aiden1234)
    hey everyone, when it comes to commercial applications of plant hormones..how much is everyone learning? because that double spread seems full of stuff we dont really need to know? is it worth learning like one?
    I would learn two for each. Auxin, rooting hormone, growth hormone by elongation. Giberrellin, stem elongation for sugar cane, germination and seed production. Cytokinins, growth by division, tissue culture. Ethene, ripening, preservation something about cucumbers lol.
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    (Original post by ViolinGirl)
    Desribe the regions of the brain, and their function and link this to the nervous and endocrine system.
    The regions of the brain:

    Cerebrum - largest part of the brain. Has a layer of thin nerve cell bodies called the cerebral cortex which is highly folded. The cerebrum is associated with higher brain functions such as overriding some reflexes, conscious thought and emotions and reasoning/judgement and thus the basis of intelligence.

    Cerebellum - when the decision to move is made in the cerebrum, there is a lot of non-conscious operation of the body that must be carrie out in order for movement and activities to be possible.

    In order to do this is requires a lot of information such as:
    -Muscle activity and position in order to maintain body position and remain upright
    -Get feedback from the muscle position, tension (via spindle fibres) and fine moevments
    -Contraction and relaxation of antagonistic muscle for muscle movement
    -Distance of limbs and objects

    The cerebellum - responsible for the coordination of movement and posture

    Contains over half the nerve cells in the brain and it carries out all the non-conscious movement of muscle that is required when carrying out a complex activity such as riding a bike etc.

    It receives sensory inputs from:
    -Balance organs in the inner ear
    -The retina
    -The joints
    -the spindle fibres in muscles which provide info on tension etc. Found on the bottom right f the brain if the front is on the left and appears like a 'cabbage' as my teacher says.

    The Medulla oblongata:
    Controls the non-voluntary (i.e. all muscle cept skeletal) muscle, which means its in controls of many vital processes such as breathing and the heart beat, it contains centres for this in order to carry out these functions.
    -Cardiovascular centre - controls the heart beat by receiving impulses indirectly from the rest of the body, such as stretch receptors, low pH of blood or low Blood Pressure which sends impulses along the motor neurones to the cardiac muscle along the accelerator nerve. this secretes Noradrenaline which binds to receptors on the SAN to increase heart rate

    -Respiratory centre - controls breathing, rate and depth

    Hypothalamus - This contains receptors to ensure the body conditions remain at optimum, such as osmo and thermo receptors. These detect changes in internal conditions and cause negative feedback mechanisms to come into affect via the autonomic NS. The hyp is also said to be in control of the endocrine system because it is in control of the pituitary gland and can stimulate it to produce tropic hormones.

    The CNS = the brain and spinal cord linked together which is connected to the rest of the body by the peripheral NS which brings impulses to and from the CNS.

    Is that linked enough? (im redoing F214 anyway).

    Describe the structures of the 3 different types of muscles
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    (Original post by Sakujo)
    I would learn two for each. Auxin, rooting hormone, growth hormone by elongation. Giberrellin, stem elongation for sugar cane, germination and seed production. Cytokinins, growth by division, tissue culture. Ethene, ripening, preservation something about cucumbers lol.
    Ethene promotes sex expression in female cucumbers (which reduces the chance of self-pollination which makes cucumbers tase bitter) and so cucumbers preserving the taste.
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    (Original post by Falcon91)
    The regions of the brain:

    Cerebrum - largest part of the brain. Has a layer of thin nerve cell bodies called the cerebral cortex which is highly folded. The cerebrum is associated with higher brain functions such as overriding some reflexes, conscious thought and emotions and reasoning/judgement and thus the basis of intelligence.

    Cerebellum - when the decision to move is made in the cerebrum, there is a lot of non-conscious operation of the body that must be carrie out in order for movement and activities to be possible.

    In order to do this is requires a lot of information such as:
    -Muscle activity and position in order to maintain body position and remain upright
    -Get feedback from the muscle position, tension (via spindle fibres) and fine moevments
    -Contraction and relaxation of antagonistic muscle for muscle movement
    -Distance of limbs and objects

    The cerebrum - responsible for the coordination of movement and posture

    Contains over half the nerve cells in the brain and it carries out all the non-conscious movement of muscle that is required when carrying out a complex activity such as riding a bike etc.

    It receives sensory inputs from:
    -Balance organs in the inner ear
    -The retina
    -The joints
    -the spindle fibres in muscles which provide info on tension etc. Found on the bottom right f the brain if the front is on the left and appears like a 'cabbage' as my teacher says.

    The Medulla oblongata:
    Controls the non-voluntary (i.e. all muscle cept skeletal) muscle, which means its in controls of many vital processes such as breathing and the heart beat, it contains centres for this in order to carry out these functions.
    -Cardiovascular centre - controls the heart beat by receiving impulses indirectly from the rest of the body, such as stretch receptors, low pH of blood or low Blood Pressure which sends impulses along the motor neurones to the cardiac muscle along the accelerator nerve. this secretes Noradrenaline which binds to receptors on the SAN to increase heart rate

    -Respiratory centre - controls breathing, rate and depth

    Hypothalamus - This contains receptors to ensure the body conditions remain at optimum, such as osmo and thermo receptors. These detect changes in internal conditions and cause negative feedback mechanisms to come into affect via the autonomic NS. The hyp is also said to be in control of the endocrine system because it is in control of the pituitary gland and can stimulate it to produce tropic hormones.

    The CNS = the brain and spinal cord linked together which is connected to the rest of the body by the peripheral NS which brings impulses to and from the CNS.

    Is that linked enough? (im redoing F214 anyway).

    Describe the structures of the 3 different types of muscles
    OMG that is bloody brilliant... did you type that from memory or just checked as part of the textbook? I swear down that is amazing..if you could remember all of that.. I'm also redoing F214 as well.. i dunno how you managed to know all that as well as F214 stuff..
    now im really **** scaredd!!!!!! :eek:
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    (Original post by HELPME-ology)
    OMG that is bloody brilliant... did you type that from memory or just checked as part of the textbook? I swear down that is amazing..if you could remember all of that.. I'm also redoing F214 as well.. i dunno how you managed to know all that as well as F214 stuff..
    now im really **** scaredd!!!!!! :eek:
    I did that from memory. I havent actually gone over F214 stuff, i do believe i know it because i learned it all to memory but i panicked in the exam and didnt use my knowledge and common sense.
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    (Original post by Falcon91)
    I did that from memory. I havent actually gone over F214 stuff, i do believe i know it because i learned it all to memory but i panicked in the exam and didnt use my knowledge and common sense.
    Ohh wow!!! Still amazed tho..any tips on how you manage to memorise that? really need help.. cos biology is annoying now.. i cant remember everything [as you all can] to write answers up.. please helpp!!!
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    (Original post by Falcon91)
    Ethene promotes sex expression in female cucumbers (which reduces the chance of self-pollination which makes cucumbers tase bitter) and so cucumbers preserving the taste.
    :yep:
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    (Original post by HELPME-ology)
    Ohh wow!!! Still amazed tho..any tips on how you manage to memorise that? really need help.. cos biology is annoying now.. i cant remember everything [as you all can] to write answers up.. please helpp!!!
    Basically, what i do is 1 of 2 things depending on how well i remember it.

    The first is to read it, makes notes of the key points (using a print off of the specification because theres too much waffle to sift through). Then use the basic method of hiding the notes, turning over the page and trying to say it all off by heart. If i forget some points i try and think for a few mins and if i still dont get it i look at the page and points i miss.
    The other thing to do is try and write the points down instead of saying it aloud, this might help more for the exam as your writing out the info ( i dont do this AS much as memory work aloud though).

    I just repeat that a few times, i usually get it by then for that day. After that repeat this and youll find you will forget one or two things but dont worry about that as long as you have the key points memorized.

    as you said you dont remember it, try writing the points down repeteadly, repetition will work...always does. Good luck mate.
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    Please can someone help with phenotype ratios and epistasis? I really don't understand :sad:
    :dance:
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    (Original post by Falcon91)
    Basically, what i do is 1 of 2 things depending on how well i remember it.

    The first is to read it, makes notes of the key points (using a print off of the specification because theres too much waffle to sift through). Then use the basic method of hiding the notes, turning over the page and trying to say it all off by heart. If i forget some points i try and think for a few mins and if i still dont get it i look at the page and points i miss.
    The other thing to do is try and write the points down instead of saying it aloud, this might help more for the exam as your writing out the info ( i dont do this AS much as memory work aloud though).

    I just repeat that a few times, i usually get it by then for that day. After that repeat this and youll find you will forget one or two things but dont worry about that as long as you have the key points memorized.

    as you said you dont remember it, try writing the points down repeteadly, repetition will work...always does. Good luck mate.
    I have tried writing down the points on a piece of paper..learning it and recalling it...that defo works although its only that day.. ?
    And yeh I am now trying to memorise out aloud after learning points...they are helping its just an issue of trying to know it by memory for GOOD!!
    Because the next day I feel yeh I've learnt it yday etc..and then when I learn it the next day its all vanished and I'm back to square 1 of having to recall it all again.. Which totally sucks cos its a new day and I don't wanna waste it again by still learning the same stuff and not being able to move on if you get me...
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    (Original post by HELPME-ology)
    I have tried writing down the points on a piece of paper..learning it and recalling it...that defo works although its only that day.. ?
    And yeh I am now trying to memorise out aloud after learning points...they are helping its just an issue of trying to know it by memory for GOOD!!
    Because the next day I feel yeh I've learnt it yday etc..and then when I learn it the next day its all vanished and I'm back to square 1 of having to recall it all again.. Which totally sucks cos its a new day and I don't wanna waste it again by still learning the same stuff and not being able to move on if you get me...
    Yeah its a bit of a flaw. With time running shorter, looking over it a few times just reading over it will refresh the knowledge a bit too as youll be under pressure.
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    nearly finished all of the plant/animal resonse stuff , hated this topic so much -.- hmm I think I hate everything apart from genetics
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    If you need to know anything about f215 do so please i'm here to help you out
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    (Original post by Remarqable M)
    If you need to know anything about f215 do so please i'm here to help you out
    Weeeell how to revise synoptics without going through everything again would be nice :P

    Atm im just re-reading some pages and it seems okay so far, the only part id hesistate on is biodiversity (but i havent looked at that yet).
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    (Original post by HELPME-ology)
    I have tried writing down the points on a piece of paper..learning it and recalling it...that defo works although its only that day.. ?
    And yeh I am now trying to memorise out aloud after learning points...they are helping its just an issue of trying to know it by memory for GOOD!!
    Because the next day I feel yeh I've learnt it yday etc..and then when I learn it the next day its all vanished and I'm back to square 1 of having to recall it all again.. Which totally sucks cos its a new day and I don't wanna waste it again by still learning the same stuff and not being able to move on if you get me...
    what i do is go through the whole book, writing out all definitions down on a sheet of paper while i'm doing that i look at diagrams to memorise any important steps e.g. nitrogen fixation, growth curve, neuromuscular junction etc... my strongest ability is to be to recall information just by remembering diagrams - didn't use this skill upto now lol:p:
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    (Original post by chuck111)
    nearly finished all of the plant/animal resonse stuff , hated this topic so much -.- hmm I think I hate everything apart from genetics

    huh?!?! :eek: care to enlighten me with ur genetics knowledge??
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    (Original post by Falcon91)
    Weeeell how to revise synoptics without going through everything again would be nice :P

    Atm im just re-reading some pages and it seems okay so far, the only part id hesistate on is biodiversity (but i havent looked at that yet).
    the best way to revise synoptics is to make a mind map. For example, when you look at enzyme immobilisation in chapter 2 highlight the main points then write down ENZYME IMMOBILISATION on a big A3 sheet where you write out the main points from A2 on the top and on the bottom brainstorm AS stuff e.g. enzyme/subtrate concentration, lock-key fit, induced fit etc... making sure to relate it to enzyme immobilisation.
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    (Original post by chuck111)
    nearly finished all of the plant/animal resonse stuff , hated this topic so much -.- hmm I think I hate everything apart from genetics
    lol i loved the plant/animal response stuff, especially the behaviour chapter and the gorilla bit:p: i hate genetics but i like epistasis and chi-square easy marks:p:
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    (Original post by Remarqable M)
    what i do is go through the whole book, writing out all definitions down on a sheet of paper while i'm doing that i look at diagrams to memorise any important steps e.g. nitrogen fixation, growth curve, neuromuscular junction etc... my strongest ability is to be to recall information just by remembering diagrams - didn't use this skill upto now lol:p:
    I think because i am doing F212 and F214 resit as well as F215 now.. that is why biology has gone to my head... i am absolutely overloaded with everything that when i try and learn or revise over stuff its not seeming to sink in.. and i feel i waste time havign printed stuff out considering i dont have anytime to use it now..
    F212 re-sit exam on this Tues 8th..
    F215 exam on 16th ...
    F214 re-sit exam on 25th...

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    (Original post by Falcon91)

    The cerebrum - responsible for the coordination of movement and posture

    C

    I thought the cerebellum did that!
 
 
 
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