Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    My brother started uni in September 2007 and did the 1st year of a computer science degree but failed as its was too hard and not interesting. He then transferred to a Logistics degree which he is in 2nd year, only so he could stay at the uni but he has no interest in that. He is very upset now and has said his dream is to study nutrition but is fearful of what my parents will say. He is miserable and doesn't know how prospective employers will take this if he leaves now. Is he best to leave now or finish his degree?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Perhaps he could finish the degree, as its almost over, then do some kind of conversion to nutrition afterwards?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    He dreams of studying nutrition!? I lolled; you put food in your mouth, chew, shallow - that's nutrition. He sounds very fickle and inconcistant; employers would see this as well if he changes from computer science to logistics to nutrition.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    To be honest, changing now is going to be really difficult, as student finance won't give him the money to carry on. You only get funding for 3 years + 1 (which is supposed to be if you're doing like your brother did in the first place, and changed his mind after the first year). He won't get the cash, so unless he can fund himself, he can say goodbye to nutrition.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    So he'll have changed his mind 3 times? Is he sure he wants to study nutrition? Not in a derogatory way, but he seems quite flighty. My sister is similar - she changed her A level subjects because she thought she'd made the wrong decision, but then changed them again once she'd swapped! What type of person is he?

    I'd suggest for him to stick it out, and then swap into nutrition when he has a qualification behind him. The fact that he'd have swapped between three different (VERY different - computer science to nutrition?) courses in the space of 3 or 4 years would not be a plus point for universities or employers. Encourage him to perhaps take a course in the summer that would get his employability up, or a job to earn money for a second qualification in nutrition.

    He could study with the Open University (here), or with something like this.

    I suggest he gets a qualification, gets a job (at any level), and then he can fund his learning - he can then study independently for nutrition and then eventually swap into that profession. I'm not too sure if as a course it's offered at many universities? I think it'd be a shame to waste 4 years and quite a lot of money without him gaining anything.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Try to be positive people.. No need to just criticise here. To be honest, something I think of as a problem in the UK (it's decreasing but still) is the need to go straight to uni after A-levels. Most English people I know (alot, after living there 3 years) go straight to uni, having decided when they are 18 what they want to do with their lives. If you look at a lot of the rest of Europe, especially Northern Europe, you'll see that soooo many people do 1,2,3 or more gap years BEFORE deciding. And people are normally 19 when they finish school too.

    OP, I would say that the best choice for your brother would be to finish the degree he is on now. Unfortunately there is no overlapping in the two courses, so a transfer would be difficult (and a little stupid). It's not *that* much left of his degree.. Then he can start work, and maybe do a nutrition degree part-time.

    That's my suggestion anyways..
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by punkyrocker)
    So he'll have changed his mind 3 times? Is he sure he wants to study nutrition? Not in a derogatory way, but he seems quite flighty. My sister is similar - she changed her A level subjects because she thought she'd made the wrong decision, but then changed them again once she'd swapped! What type of person is he?

    I'd suggest for him to stick it out, and then swap into nutrition when he has a qualification behind him. The fact that he'd have swapped between three different (VERY different - computer science to nutrition?) courses in the space of 3 or 4 years would not be a plus point for universities or employers. Encourage him to perhaps take a course in the summer that would get his employability up, or a job to earn money for a second qualification in nutrition.

    He could study with the Open University (here), or with something like this.

    I suggest he gets a qualification, gets a job (at any level), and then he can fund his learning - he can then study independently for nutrition and then eventually swap into that profession. I'm not too sure if as a course it's offered at many universities? I think it'd be a shame to waste 4 years and quite a lot of money without him gaining anything.
    Took the words out of my mouth!

    @OP: Yeah, he doesn't seem to have a specific interest. My sister originally wanted to do an Art degree, then a film degree, and now a fashion degree (luckily she hadn't accepted a Uni when she kept changing her mind).

    If he loses interest quite regularly, a degree may not be the best option, as you have to stick at it for 3 years. As the above poster suggests, sticking with it for the remaining year will definately be worth it for a degree in my opinion. As cranking up £1000's worth of debt won't be worth it if he changes his mind again. Otherwise, a full time job is a good option, debt-free and you can work your way up the career ladder for say, a management position. There are A-level training schemes out there for those that have completed Sixth Form.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    Perhaps he should be the one organising his life not his little sis?
    A cheap shot I know, but fair.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the PM's proposal to cut tuition fees for some courses?
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.