Turn on thread page Beta

A little confused about the UK constitution watch

Announcements
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    It says in my book:

    The democratic character of the UK constitution is maintained by the fact that the influence of unelected judges is kept to a minimum. In the USA, the constitution effectively means what the judges of the Supreme Court say it means, and these judges are in no way publicly accountable.


    This confused me, because who judges the constitution in the UK then?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by anna_disraeli)
    It says in my book:

    The democratic character of the UK constitution is maintained by the fact that the influence of unelected judges is kept to a minimum. In the USA, the constitution effectively means what the judges of the Supreme Court say it means, and these judges are in no way publicly accountable.


    This confused me, because who judges the constitution in the UK then?
    It is trying to say that because the UK constitution places Sovereignty into Parliament then democracy is maintained because the Commons is an elected body. In the US Judges can have huge influence over the actions of government even thou they are not elected.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Devel)
    It is trying to say that because the UK constitution places Sovereignty into Parliament then democracy is maintained because the Commons is an elected body. In the US Judges can have huge influence over the actions of government even thou they are not elected.
    yeah but who interprets the constitution in the UK?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by anna_disraeli)
    yeah but who interprets the constitution in the UK?
    The UK doesn't have an "official" constitution... it mainly just consists of various traditions, and a few old documents (such as the Magna Carta).

    So, there isn't a strict set of rules to follow in the UK (unlike the USA) and so there's less requirement for "interpreting the constitution" here in the UK.
    Although, I guess that the few constitution points which are made in the Magna Carta for example would be open to interpretation by the MPs in the House of Commons when they're voting on a bill which could be seen to contravene the UK 'constitution'.

    Hope this helps!
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    Ohhh. We were doing this in politics today
 
 
 
Poll
Do you like exams?
Useful resources

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.