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    Hiya
    This is for AS bio in the cell membranes part
    What are the definitions of water potential, solute potential and pressure potential? Explanations would be a real help too! As for the the definitions in the textbook, i dont get them AT ALL so in your own words would be great
    Feel free to use examples - anything that helps
    thanks a bunch!
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    Water potential = the amount of free water in a cell.

    Solute potential = the amount of solute in a cell.

    Pressure potential = the pressure exerted on the cell wall/membrane by the contents of the cell.
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    anyone?
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    Water potential is pretty much predicting where water will move to. Water always moves from the least negative to the most negative. So the water potential of the cell where the water came from will become slightly more negative, while the cell the water has gone to will become less negative. Pure water has a water potential of 0 so no positive water potentials. Hope this helps a little
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    (Original post by fortysixandtwo)
    Water potential = the amount of free water in a cell.

    Solute potential = the amount of solute in a cell.

    Pressure potential = the pressure exerted on the cell wall/membrane by the contents of the cell.
    In the textbook it says that water potential is the tendency of the water molecules to move from one place to another. And then it goes on to say that if you increase the pressure of a solution (by a piston for example) the water potential of it would increase - is this beacuse they gain KE and exert a pressure on the cell membrane/wall?
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    (Original post by UndercoverChemist)
    Water potential is pretty much predicting where water will move to. Water always moves from the least negative to the most negative. So the water potential of the cell where the water came from will become slightly more negative, while the cell the water has gone to will become less negative. Pure water has a water potential of 0 so no positive water potentials. Hope this helps a little
    Yeah thanks! I guess looking at some questions would help a bit
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    http://www.lmgtfy.com/?q=Water+potential
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    Water potential is a funny thing. I remember finding it difficult getting my head around but keep at it. It'll click, like most things in biology you just need to keep going over and over it! It's important you understand it though and not just gloss over it. It's a big foundation in a lot of biological theories you'll be taught later on.

    Think some ones already said it but..
    pure water has a water potential of 0.
    so.. if you were to dissolve some salt in your pure water ( it's no longer pure and cannot be at 0 ) this then lowers the water potential. Making it more negative.
    The more 'stufff' in your water, the more negative the water potential becomes.

    In terms of movement..
    It moves from an area of low water potential to high water potential. From purer areas to less pure areas.

    Hope that helps.
 
 
 

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