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    ive spent 49 quid this year on bloody medical prescriptions! being 19 sucks now..

    someone said i can claim it back if i get some form though? does anyone know what theyre on about? something to do with me being a student
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    Medical exemption form for prescriptions? I think you can get one if you have a perminant condition which requires you to get prescriptions regularly or die. Might be worth a google.

    http://www.nhs.uk/NHSEngland/Healthc...tioncosts.aspx
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    i suppose my asthma would count for that then.. though its not that regular that i get the prescriptions, ill have a look
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    You can't claim it back (as far as I'm aware) unless you asked for an NHS receipt when you paid for the prescriptions. Even if you did get an NHS receipt you have to fill in a pretty big form (HC1) and meet all the conditions before they'll refund you.
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    yeah the only thing i can see that might even slightly concern me is the low income scheme part :X oh well, thanks for helping
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    I filled in a hc1 form....took about 15 mins....and they refunded me everything ive paid AND I get free perscriptions and dental now :-) The certificate last for a year. You can get the from from drs, chemist or dentist. You have to have a 'low' income though. If you had a condition which made you exempt from prescripton costs, eg diabetes, then they would notify you automatically x
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    As others have said fill in a HC1 form if you are eligible.

    If not, you can buy a 12-month pre-payment certificate for £38.00.
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    (Original post by sandettielightvessel)
    If not, you can buy a 12-month pre-payment certificate for £38.00.
    It's nearer £100.

    OP - you can't get medical exemption certificate for asthma, unless you have a "continuing physical disability which means you can't get out of your home without help from another person." (which is how I qualify - good thing too - would've spent around £30 on prescriptions since being at uni else)
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    (Original post by Muffinz)
    Medical exemption form for prescriptions? I think you can get one if you have a perminant condition which requires you to get prescriptions regularly or die. Might be worth a google.

    http://www.nhs.uk/NHSEngland/Healthc...tioncosts.aspx
    It's not quite as drastic as that (or doesn't have to be!). I'm exempt because I have an underactive thyroid so need thyroxine every day. I decide not to take the thyroxine but it would mean I won't have enough of of hormone in my body (and the problems that can create) but it's not fatal. Basically someone with a chronic medical condition is often entitled to free prescriptions (as paying monthly is expensive when you need the medication). That said, for some conditions (like hypertension) a patient might not be eligible for free prescriptions and will instead need to pay months/buy a pre-payment certificate. This is despite the obvious dangers and complications associated with chronic high bp.

    Medical expemption certificate might be an option, the rules can be a bit funny on things like these so I'm not sure whether asthma does qualify on its own. You can also speak with your GP or even a receptionist at the surgery.
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    Alternatively, move to Wales, where prescriptions are free :p:

    I had no idea until recently that people in England had to pay for prescriptions. Before then, I'd presumed that having something prescribed meant that you didn't have to pay for it!

    In all seriousness, one way of cutting down on prescription charges is to ask for your doctor to prescribe more medication in one go, so you don't have to pay the charge quite so often.
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    (Original post by RightSaidJames)
    In all seriousness, one way of cutting down on prescription charges is to ask for your doctor to prescribe more medication in one go, so you don't have to pay the charge quite so often.
    They can only prescribe one month at a time, I think.
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    I applied for help towards my prescriptions by filling out the HC1 form and they came to a rediculous conclusion. I got sent a 'partial help' certificate and it says I have to pay £14.xx towards the cost of my presciptions.. which is pretty stupid because if I don't use the certificate, the prescription cost for the general public is £7.xx I believe?

    I don't see why I wasn't entitled to full help considering I'm a full time student and at the time of applying I had never had a job and they calculated that I have £14.xx spare money every week from my 'income' which is actually the student loan, so how is a loan classed as 'income'! Do they take savings into account? Because I've got abit of my student loan in an ISA.

    I'm pretty annoyed as I have to buy a number of medicines every month which are very expensive!
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    (Original post by Twinkle06)
    I applied for help towards my prescriptions by filling out the HC1 form and they came to a rediculous conclusion. I got sent a 'partial help' certificate and it says I have to pay £14.xx towards the cost of my presciptions.. which is pretty stupid because if I don't use the certificate, the prescription cost for the general public is £7.xx I believe?

    I don't see why I wasn't entitled to full help considering I'm a full time student and at the time of applying I had never had a job and they calculated that I have £14.xx spare money every week from my 'income' which is actually the student loan, so how is a loan classed as 'income'! Do they take savings into account? Because I've got abit of my student loan in an ISA.

    I'm pretty annoyed as I have to buy a number of medicines every month which are very expensive!
    Loans are counted as income. Savings, I believe, are only taken into account if you have more than £16,000 (or something like that).

    Maybe the partial help refers to buying a PPC? Otherwise I'm not sure. The cost of a prescription is about £5 per item if you don't have a certificate.
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    (Original post by sandettielightvessel)
    Loans are counted as income. Savings, I believe, are only taken into account if you have more than £16,000 (or something like that).
    It's £6k. After that, any £250 (or part of) is counted as £1 extra per week.

    I don't see why I wasn't entitled to full help considering I'm a full time student and at the time of applying I had never had a job
    Both of these are irrelevant.

    Medical expemption certificate might be an option, the rules can be a bit funny on things like these so I'm not sure whether asthma does qualify on its own. You can also speak with your GP or even a receptionist at the surgery.
    Asthma doesn't qualify someone for exemption.

    If you are exempt, this is any medication you take.
 
 
 
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