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Feel completely let down by GP/ Hospital watch

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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I was thinking it was more paroxysmal, as it only seems to come on at certain times... but what do I know.
    Next time you get the palpitations why don't you feel your pulse and see if you are in AF. :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Ataloss)
    Next time you get the palpitations why don't you feel your pulse and see if you are in AF. :rolleyes:
    I have, and I can swear that I can feel it speeding up and slowing down. But then again, that may be due to my levels of anxiety... meh.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I have, and I can swear that I can feel it speeding up and slowing down. But then again, that may be due to my levels of anxiety... meh.
    Fine - but when it speeds up are you in AF?
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    (Original post by Ataloss)
    Fine - but when it speeds up are you in AF?
    I'm not worried about when it speeds up, its when I can no longer feel it in a regular rhythm that I start to worry and think that I'm in AF.
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    Its not AF, as many other users have been saying, you would be symptomatic and an ECG would point it out by now.

    I think you need to realize that you are fine, and you are stressing about it too much. I mean you've seen a cardiologist, its not like they haven't taken you seriously.

    (Original post by flying twig)
    Also, I read a thing about the way a lot of medical students develop hypochondria and start to imagine they have all sorts of diseases.
    Lool being a hypochondriac, our lecturer said that too but it was based on some study that he read. Although when we go over certain topics I guess you do end up worrying when you get any of those symptoms...but in the end its all in your head For a while, I kept on thinking I had anemia and then I thought I had diabetes...from silly things i picked up

    I doubt that the OP is a hypochondriac tho.
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    The best cure for palpitations and rhythm disturbances is 24 hour tape. Makes them go away for a day!
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Oh, and I also had a blood test a few months back which came back normal, but I understand that myocarditis can go unnoticed even in blood tests. I feel like the only way I'm going to get reassurance is if these symptoms stop, and at the moment it looks like they're not going to stop any time soon because no one is taking me seriously.
    With myocarditis the cardiac enzymes are elevated and the ECG shows T wave inversion.
    Your problem sounds like anxiety, probably panic attacks.
    You are wasting the hospital´s and the GP´s time and resources.
    Go see a psychologist.
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    (Original post by petzneo)
    Its not AF, as many other users have been saying, you would be symptomatic and an ECG would point it out by now.
    Unless it's paroxysmal AF, which comes and goes (dont tell the OP though)
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I have, and I can swear that I can feel it speeding up and slowing down. But then again, that may be due to my levels of anxiety... meh.
    Repeat after me:
    ¨In atrial fibrillation, the pulse is irregularly irregular
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    (Original post by Awesome-o)
    Unless it's paroxysmal AF, which comes and goes (dont tell the OP though)
    (Original post by flugestuge)
    Repeat after me:
    ¨In atrial fibrillation, the pulse is irregularly irregular
    Thanks for the reassurance, guys!
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    (Original post by Awesome-o)
    Unless it's paroxysmal AF, which comes and goes (dont tell the OP though)
    Lool, actually i think the OP stated that it might be paroxysmal but I thought best to ignore that (even though I remember the lecturer saying that)...as I think a cardiologist knows better than I do
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I have, and I can swear that I can feel it speeding up and slowing down. But then again, that may be due to my levels of anxiety... meh.
    Is the speeding up and slowing down linked to your resps? I'm commonly in sinus arrhythmia, which comes and goes and feels like you're describing. It's just a normal variation: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Respira...nus_arrhythmia
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    (Original post by Hygeia)
    Is the speeding up and slowing down linked to your resps? I'm commonly in sinus arrhythmia, which comes and goes and feels like you're describing. It's just a normal variation: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Respira...nus_arrhythmia
    Now that you mention it... it actually does! :eek:

    Thank you!
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Now that you mention it... it actually does!

    Thank you!
    It really freaked me out the first time I noticed it (while studying cardiology of course :p:) and is definitely more prominent if I'm a bit emotional or anxious but I'm used to it now and like scaring others when they try and take my pulse and can't work out what's going on
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    OKay guys, I'm pretty sure this wasn't hypochondriasis/ anxiety. Whilst sat down and watching TV I suddenly got a very sharp burst of chest pain (it was more central this time) and made me jump up, and made my left hand tingle. The pain subsided within a few seconds but I can still feel the tingling in my left hand slightly. I just wish this would stop!
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    You half-baked medical students are so irritating.
    A little knowledge.... leads to hypochondriasis.


    ¨Hypochondria is often characterized by fears that minor bodily symptoms may indicate a serious illness, constant self-examination and self-diagnosis, and a preoccupation with one's body.
    Many individuals with hypochondriasis express doubt and disbelief in the doctors' diagnosis, and report that doctors’ reassurance about an absence of a serious medical condition is unconvincing, or un-lasting. ¨

    Go learn a little medicine first.
    Then you can worry about really scary things like Brugada Syndrome, which like the hand of god, can strike you dead in a fraction of a second.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Second year.

    Well apparently an ECG costs about 30p to produce, and doesn't need much paperwork etc, and I feel that if nothing showed up the first two times, why would anything come up the third time? Why not send me for a different investigation? This is why I can't take them seriously. An ECG seems to be the simplest get out clause for them.

    They tell me nothing is wrong, then I find myself getting more symptoms when I get home. This is what worries me.
    You are very wrong about the cost of an ECG.
    It costs at least £4.
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    (Original post by Awesome-o)
    Unless it's paroxysmal AF, which comes and goes (dont tell the OP though)
    Yes, but she/he has had at least one done while she was having the chest pain, so if it was even only paroxysmal AF (incredibly uncommon in someone our age with no cardiac history anyway) that one would be likely to have shown it.
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    Have you thought about SVT? My friend has that and had the same symtoms as you. See another docor and mention SVT if you think it might be that. My friend went to the doctor loads of times before they actually diagnosed her.
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    My brother who was fifteen at the time started getting chest pains on a regular basis, even with tingling down his arm. He went to A&E and they did an ECG and blood tests and even a chest x ray and everything was fine. He kept getting the pain and so went to the doctors who told him it was stress/anxiety. He didnt believe them and went back to A&E another time and they gave him another ECG which was normal. He got a referral for an ultrasound on his heart and when that came back clear he finally agreed with the doctors that it was anxiety related.
 
 
 
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