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    This is probably a very basic problem but my mind has gone blank, so I apologise in advance :P

    Suppose I had a compound X. I measured out a weight of it such that there were 0.6 moles of it. I then added it to 10 ml of water to make a solution of it.
    (So the concentration of it in the 10 ml of water would be 60moldm^-3, right?)

    Next, I only want 1 ml of the solution, so I take it 1ml of it out and put it into a beaker, already containing say 10 ml of a different solution. What would be the concentration of the solution of compound X in the beaker?

    Thanks in advance!
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    (Original post by lauram992)
    This is probably a very basic problem but my mind has gone blank, so I apologise in advance :P

    Suppose I had a compound X. I measured out a weight of it such that there were 0.6 moles of it. I then added it to 10 ml of water to make a solution of it.
    (So the concentration of it in the 10 ml of water would be 60moldm^-3, right?)

    Next, I only want 1 ml of the solution, so I take it 1ml of it out and put it into a beaker, already containing say 10 ml of a different solution. What would be the concentration of the solution of compound X in the beaker?

    Thanks in advance!
    This is assuming compound X hasn't undergone any reactions, right?

    60 mol dm^-3 should be right. (That number is really high though, not sure if it's realistic :p:)

    In 1ml of the solution there would be (60 * 0.001 = 0.06) mol.

    (I realise I'm using a sort of round-about method here, but hopefully it helps you understand )

    Since you're adding 1 ml to 10ml of a different solution, you'll end up with a total of 11ml.

    You now have 0.06 mol of Compound X in the 11ml solution.

    Conc. of X in the solution = 0.06/0.011 mol dm^-3

    Sorry if I've gone wrong anywhere
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    (Original post by LetoKynes)
    This is assuming compound X hasn't undergone any reactions, right?

    60 mol dm^-3 should be right. (That number is really high though, not sure if it's realistic :p:)

    In 1ml of the solution there would be (60 * 0.01 = 0.6) mol.

    Since you're adding 1 ml to 10ml of a different solution, you'll end up with a total of 11ml.

    You now have 0.6 mol of Compound X in the 11ml solution.

    Conc. of X in the solution = 0.6/0.011 mol dm^-3

    Sorry if I've gone wrong anywhere
    Thanks, but when you take the 1ml out, you wouldn't be removing the whole 0.6 moles, would you? :P
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    (Original post by lauram992)
    Thanks, but when you take the 1ml out, you wouldn't be removing the whole 0.6 moles, would you? :P
    Woops sorry lol, had it right at first then edited it and made it wrong :woo: re-edited it, should be okay now
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    (Original post by LetoKynes)
    Woops sorry lol, had it right at first then edited it and made it wrong :woo: re-edited it, should be okay now
    Ahh ok, thanks for your help
 
 
 
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