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Protesters stage mass overdose outside Boots watch

  • View Poll Results: Homeopathy
    It works
    15
    10.95%
    I have no opinion
    25
    18.25%
    It's a con... A fool and his money are soon parted!
    97
    70.80%

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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Last time I checked you had eyes to read a label. And you were not forced with a gun to buy them?
    They are pretending they are medicine and pretending they work. It shouldn't be legal, and Boots certainly shouldn't decide to make money out of it.
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    (Original post by fire2burn)
    Those doctors are a minority and rubbished by their colleagues on a regular basis.
    Nice made up rubbish, proof?
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Thats why qualified doctors use them in treatment yes?
    In some specific cases, they use them as part of a broader homeopathic approach. They don't actually alter any of the body's functions.
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    (Original post by kamc)
    I'm a bit confused about homeopathic remedies though, I know its tablets that are so diluted it no longer has any of the actual thing it claims is in it but I thought things like acupuncture also counted as homeopathic, and I have no objections to that being on the NHS :confused:

    I think the majority of people don't understand what homeopathic means, I know I don't, so can someone clear it up for me? Does homeopathic include alternative things like acupuncture or massages? :confused:
    Homeopathy is only the dilution thing. It falls under the category of alternative "medicine," as does things like acupuncture. All homeopathy is alternative "medicine," but not all alternative "medicine" is homeopathy.
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    (Original post by reems23)
    He's right.
    Yeah, I know. He also wants me to be outraged. I am outraged.

    And you're a medic?!
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    The protest was sparked off because these placebos are dangerous. There is an anti-maleria one which people are buying before they go abroad with the belief that it will keep them safe. Clearly it wont, and boots shouldnt be giving homeopathy the credibility its getting by beeing sold in their stores.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    In some specific cases, they use them as part of a broader homeopathic approach. They don't actually alter any of the body's functions.
    Yes so if they feel the need for it to be used as part of treatment, the problem is?
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Thats why qualified doctors use them in treatment yes?
    if any do, they should have their medical license taken off them

    there have been rigorous drug trials that prove beyond all reasonable doubt that they are completely useless, and are nothing more than a placebo.

    if doctors want to prescribe a placebo, they should do just that. much cheaper, and wastes less money
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    (Original post by nolongerhearthemusic)
    They are pretending they are medicine and pretending they work. It shouldn't be legal, and Boots certainly shouldn't decide to make money out of it.
    They are not shown as medicines, they are shown as homeopathic treatments.
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    To be honest I think it's useful enough as a self prescribed placebo. You can hardly give an adult a sweet and tell him hes going to be better.
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    (Original post by Lou Reed)
    Hey, do you know a single thing about homeopathy?
    Do you?
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    tbh i think this is silly

    i agree with rucklo, it's not as if they force you to buy them!! i mean so what if they sell it? does this mean they're going to go outside neal's yard and do the same (i believe they sell natural remedies there too, my friend was using a natural anti depressant remedy from there) if im being honest sometimes i do prefer to use natural remedies.. my boyfriend really does not approve - he's a biochemist - and thinks you should just take real medicine but he wouldnt go that far and protest over it

    lol i have actually seen a doctor say leave homoeopaths alone.. dr phil is it? i cant remember but he was on have i got news for you.

    i really do think some people go well over the top about trivial things now a days!!
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    (Original post by didgeridoo12uk)
    if any do, they should have their medical license taken off them

    there have been rigorous drug trials that prove beyond all reasonable doubt that they are completely useless, and are nothing more than a placebo.

    if doctors want to prescribe a placebo, they should do just that. much cheaper, and wastes less money
    They clearly do because the NHS spends money on them lmao.

    Yeah I assume you have a medical degree to back your last point up?
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    Wiki Support Team
    To be honest I don't know a lot about homeopathy and how it works...but I do know that 'St. John's Wart' can cause some hormone-based contraceptives not to work...so surely it's doing something...even if it's not what it's meant to do
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    They are not shown as medicines, they are shown as homeopathic treatments.
    And that implies they actually work. It's at least false advertising.

    (Original post by skipp)
    To be honest I don't know a lot about homeopathy and how it works...but I do know that 'St. John's Wart' can cause some hormone-based contraceptives not to work...so surely it's doing something...even if it's not what it's meant to do
    That isn't homeopathy. Not all alternative medicine is homeopathy.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Homeopathy
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    (Original post by kay_spiritedaway)
    tbh i think this is silly

    i agree with rucklo, it's not as if they force you to buy them!! i mean so what if they sell it? does this mean they're going to go outside neal's yard and do the same (i believe they sell natural remedies there too, my friend was using a natural anti depressant remedy from there) if im being honest sometimes i do prefer to use natural remedies.. my boyfriend really does not approve - he's a biochemist - and thinks you should just take real medicine but he wouldnt go that far and protest over it

    lol i have actually seen a doctor say leave homoeopaths alone.. dr phil is it? i cant remember but he was on have i got news for you.

    i really do think some people go well over the top about trivial things now a days!!
    natural antidepressants actually have things in them.

    homeopathy is just water.
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    (Original post by MrGuillotine)
    Yeah, I know. He also wants me to be outraged. I am outraged.

    And you're a medic?!
    I meant, you are right. Silly man.
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    (Original post by Rucklo)
    Nice made up rubbish, proof?
    Wait for the med students to arrive

    No evidence exists to justify the use of homoeopathy in the NHS, an in-depth analysis of published data has concluded.

    The study, carried out by the NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination, based at York University, reviewed data from over 200 randomised clinical trials of homoeopathy in a variety of conditions.

    It concluded that not only was there little evidence to support the efficacy of homoeopathy, but the data that did exist were of poor quality and came from trials that were often deeply flawed.

    From the British Medical Journal: http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/extract/324/7337/565/a
    Homoeopaths argue that their treatments are not amenable to statistical analysis in the same way as conventional medicine is, in part because most trials of homoeopathic medicines do not individualise treatment. I can give an example from my own practice: anaesthesia for coronary artery surgery. In this, treatment is tailored to individuals, whose coronary anatomy is unique, yet statistical analysis shows an aggregate beneficial effect from treatment. This is how medicine works; patients are individuals yet patterns can be recognised, and this allows us to base our diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on these patterns.

    Why should homoeopathy be allowed to hide behind a smokescreen that is denied to conventional medicine, and why should the NHS fund such treatment in the absence of any evidence of useful effect? The answer is that the providers have a lot to gain, in terms of financial reward and intellectual acceptance; quacks will always be with us.

    Michael Foley, consultant anaesthetist.

    Source: http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/325/7354/41
    The World Health Organization has said that homoeopathy should not be used to treat several serious diseases such as HIV, tuberculosis, and malaria, after doctors drew attention to the continuing promotion of such complementary therapies in many developing countries.

    WHO also said that it does not recommend homoeopathy for treating diarrhoea in infants or flu.

    WHO experts, who have clearly criticised the use of treatments that have not been proved clinically and that are not evidence based, said that homoeopathy had "no place" in treatment of these five dangerous diseases.

    Source: http://www.bmj.com/cgi/content/extra.../aug24_2/b3447
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    (Original post by nolongerhearthemusic)
    And that implies they actually work. It's at least false advertising.
    No, if a person does not know the definition of the word, there a fool for buying a product that they don't know what is in it.
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    (Original post by fire2burn)
    Wait for the med students to arrive
    The last point, why the **** would you use it for something like AID's when there is drugs for that.
 
 
 
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