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Protesters stage mass overdose outside Boots watch

  • View Poll Results: Homeopathy
    It works
    15
    10.95%
    I have no opinion
    25
    18.25%
    It's a con... A fool and his money are soon parted!
    97
    70.80%

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    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    Your own wikipedia link places chriopractic together with homeopathy. Look at the grouping on the right. Also see http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/Homeopa...roduction.aspx. Perhaps chriopracty is not homepathy in a very technical sense, but its pretty damn close and certainly comes within the "alternative medicine" umbrella that people hate so much.
    It places Homeopathy as one sub-category of "alternative medicine". Chiropracty is a different sub-category, obviously related but not at all the same thing. Is there a difference between sheep and cows only in a "very technical sense"? After all, they're both mammals and are thus closely related. Not a very difficult concept.

    Note: hating on homeopathy does not mean you also hate other forms of alternative medicine. I am an obvious counterexample to this.
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    hey whys everyone being so mean to boots, they have nice sushi *****es
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    (Original post by Giggsy's Girl)
    Nil hours contract mate, I work in a whole lot of branches.

    Actually I had to do a tutorial on alternative therapies/homeopathy (everyone working on heathcare has to do this) and yeah.... not much more than essential oils and sleeping pills.
    ok , here you go...
    http://www.boots.com/en/Pharmacy-Hea...es/Homeopathy/
    ...an entire section of boots' website dedicated to the stuff.


    they DEFINATELY sell it.



    edit: note how it has their own branding on it.
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    (Original post by morecambebay)
    ok , here you go...
    http://www.boots.com/en/Pharmacy-Hea...es/Homeopathy/
    ...an entire section of boots' website dedicated to the stuff.


    they definitely sell it.
    Yeah I've seen those little pill things before, though I've never sold one in 3 years of working there. And like I said originally, they don't claim to be an alternative to pharmacy or 'chemical' drugs.
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    This post is getting angry...
    Maybe it's time to get my scented oils (note to self: this is not a homeopathic remedy) out...
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    (Original post by Giggsy's Girl)
    Yeah I've seen those little pill things before, though I've never sold one in 3 years of working there. And like I said originally, they don't claim to be an alternative to pharmacy or 'chemical' drugs.
    they claim it too be alot more than it is.

    it is water.

    when have you ever seen water with a 'hazards and cautions' label, or instructions of use.
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    (Original post by fire2burn)
    Seeing as homeopathy is a great big con, I doubt they'll suffer any ill effects. Thoughts and opinions? Good way to protests, or are they simply wasting their time?
    Ahh priceless. I would have joined in. Homeopathy is absolutely ridiculous. Its actually harmful in the sense that people rely on the totally scientifically ineffective remedies in place of remedies that actually work.
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    Lol:

    "Hazards and Cautions

    If you think you have insomnia, consult a registered medical practitioner before taking this product. If you are already receiving medical treatment, tell your doctor that you are also taking this product.

    You must be at least 16 years old to purchase this product
    This is a medicine; Consult your doctor or pharmacist if you have an underlying medical condition, are taking any other medication or complementary therapy, or if, symptoms persist.

    Seek advice before using if you are breast feeding, pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or suffer from allergies.
    Keep all medicines out of the reach of children."

    http://www.boots.com/en/Boots-Insomn...-Tablets_1650/

    "A homeopathic medicine for the relief of sleeplessness."
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    16
    http://www.boots.com/en/Nelsons-Arni...llules_866155/
    Fantastic review.
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    I would have done joined in with this today if I'd hadn't been at work, homeopathy makes me very angry. If a big name brand like Boots sells this crap then people assume that it works, because it's in their chemist. My parents are true believers and they tried to treat my sister's behavioural problems with sugar pills and chiropractic (recommended by the homeopath). When I kept getting tonsilitis, the homeopath diagnosed me over the phone.

    ETA: LOL that review is amazing
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    Skeptics Not Sceptics!
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    (Original post by fire2burn)
    The NHS is using your taxes to fund them, don't you find that objectionable? They're literally throwing money down the pan on this junk.
    but surely the people who the NHS are buying them for are happy and willing to take them, so what does it matter. Some drugs don't always do what they were intended for they work on the animals they are tested on but not humans in the same way. If you were ill and the medication wasn't working wouldn't you want to try other options?
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    (Original post by joey.)
    but surely the people who the NHS are buying them for are happy and willing to take them, so what does it matter. Some drugs don't always do what they were intended for they work on the animals they are tested on but not humans in the same way. If you were ill and the medication wasn't working wouldn't you want to try other options?
    These other options DON'T WORK. They're a waste of money, and they shouldn't be sold or prescribed as if they were actually going to do something. The money spent on it by the NHS could be spent elsewhere. And the fact that the NHS prescribes them means legitimises them, potentially encouraging people to spend their own money on it.

    (Original post by tomheppy)
    Skeptics Not Sceptics!
    No... sceptics :P
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    (Original post by fire2burn)
    Doubt it, I don't vote Tory you see and I object to fox hunting. They'd probably lynch me and call me a commie.
    **Deep Breath** False alarm then! :p:
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    (Original post by ttocserp)
    Your statement is pathetic and is so commonly used.
    Are you under the illusion that if these are stopped by the NHS you will receive some sort of tax deduction in the future or you will see some tangible improvement in an area controlled by the government which will directly benefit you all thanks to a reallocation of this '12 million' or would you prefer some sort of tax rebate of 19p
    They could spend the saved money on cancer treatment units, or something. It'd be better.
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    (Original post by Dora the Dagger)
    The truth is that the mind is an amazing thing - placebo is very powerful.
    If people believe homeopathic remedies make them better, let them.

    Sometimes all that is needed is the belief that you will get better.
    One might as well start selling magic medicine in that case. I wonder what your reaction would be if doctors started telling people to "pray for a miracle" instead of prescribing actual medicine?
    We are not little kids who need Santa to take care of ourselves, and selling something as a remedy when it clearly isn't is not just false advertising, its also highly unethical.
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    If the research is out there that challenges the efficacy of these homeopathic remedies and still walk into a shop and buy them, that is their right. It is also the right for people to protest outside boots,but to me I have no issue with people buying these remedies providing they are informed of the positives and negatives of taking them.

    I can see why some people might look at alternative treatments because of side effects from some conventional medications, the fact you can get more ill from taking these medications just like someone can get ill from relying on a unprovable homeopathic remedy for an affliction. I also happen to know drugs companies that make these conventional medications, don't do it out of the goodness of their hearts, and if there were other less costly ways that could compete with them, it stands to reason they would want to discredit it as much as possible.

    Personally,If I got sick I would chuck my lot in with the provable ways to cure it and take my doctors advice, but I certainly wouldn't suggest people don't have the right to treat illness's how they want. Also if you have something like cancer and conventional medicine cannot cure you and you have x months to live, wouldn't you try everything possible?


    As for the NHS pouring in the money, well I would like to know of what treatments are termed alternative medicine, look at individually before making a decision. I wouldn't be happy if I heard they had employed some hippy with her crystals when we are denying people drugs that could perhaps prolong their life.
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    Would laugh if they died
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    (Original post by ish90an)
    One might as well start selling magic medicine in that case. I wonder what your reaction would be if doctors started telling people to "pray for a miracle" instead of prescribing actual medicine?
    We are not little kids who need Santa to take care of ourselves, and selling something as a remedy when it clearly isn't is not just false advertising, its also highly unethical.
    Define 'remedy'?
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    (Original post by reems23)
    Define 'remedy'?
    Anything that can cure(i.e end) a medical condition.
 
 
 
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