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    Im sort of debating whether to this at university but it seems quite boring , however the job prospects seem good,, i don't have a great interest in rocks but i dont hate it either so i was just wondering whether it is literally all about rocks or are there other modules that are not as related to rocks? i LOVE geography but im not going to do that because i DO NOT want to end up as a teacher!!. so can anyone give me some PROS AND CONS!! about this course, or suggest other courses that relate to EARTH SCIENCES etc...
    by the way subjects that i take are BIOLOGY CHEMISTRY GEOGRAPHY AND HISTORY
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    have a look on some uni's sites, they'll most likely tell you what sort of things are on the course, like the modules and stuff..

    i've applied to do it at uni with physical geography, cos i like all that kind of stuff, volcanoes etc, and didnt know whether straight geology would be too sciency.. but i dunno, lol, and i HATE human geography :p:

    but yeah just have a bit of a research, im pretty sure its not aaallll just looking at rocks (i hope :p: )


    i dont think ive been much help but nevermind :rolleyes:
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    Different courses will have different modules and different emphases. You'll usually cover a broad range of topics including mineralogy, paeleontology, volcanology, earthquakes, other earth systems, faulting, 'economic' geology, etc, etc. These should all be outlined on their websites.
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    I did it for a year and hated it. I never want to look at another rock again. There are other modules about the earth's systems etc but all the practicals were rock related and most of the lectures were too. In the end it all comes down to rocks. Eugh.
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    We had one module in the first year which was only on rocks (i mean obviously they popped up occasionally in other modules but they weren't the main topic content) and in second year we have 2 rock modules, one on sedimentary and the other on igneous and metamorphic. It's not overly rocky and there are loads of other things like geophysical surveying, earth systems, natural hazards (volcanoes, earthquakes etc.), paleobiology, geochemistry, petroleum studies... i could go on. The beauty about a geology degree is that it can take you so so so many places because you're equipped with a set of really good base skills which you can then apply to lots of different situations.

    In comparison to physical geography, i'd say geology's probably harder just because there's much more scientific basis. I did a geomorphology module(geography) last year and it was basically A level geography environments with a small bit of maths for things like river sinuosity and easy things like that. Apparantly that was the hardest geography module too and it was, without a doubt, my easiest module of the year. In the second year the geographers spend 2 modules learning something that we go on to learn in one module and they still can't do it as well as we can! Anyway, i should stop telling you how rubbish geographers are and advise that if you aren't sure you could do a geology with physical geography degree and that way you could change to either one of them as single honours if you didn't like the other. Still, geology is awesome... give it a go!
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    I'm in first year and do Petroleum Geology and Geography. We've only now started to look at rocks and the earths chemistry which is much science orientated with lab/practical work etc. The first semester we covered: planetary geology, absoulte/relative timing, earths layers, earthquakes, plate tectonics, subduction, mantle melting, sedimentary basins, volcanism, oil and gas, palaentology and mapping practicals. Oh and fieldtrips!

    In comparison to Geography, Geology is harder especially if you haven't got any background in Chemistry or Physics. It is a great subject and even if you did go for Geography, there are plenty of careers other than teaching. :p:
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    (Original post by rosie9391)
    It is a great subject and even if you did go for Geography, there are plenty of careers other than teaching. :p:
    but what other careers exactly?!? i never hear of any geographers getting any jobs except teaching and graduate jobs in Marks and Spencers! lol
    So do you know what your going to go into after your degree by any chance?

    by the way thanks for replying
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    (Original post by SmartFool)
    but what other careers exactly?!? i never hear of any geographers getting any jobs except teaching and graduate jobs in Marks and Spencers! lol
    So do you know what your going to go into after your degree by any chance?

    by the way thanks for replying
    The career opportunites are endless... there's been a few threads on it in the past, here and here for example. Anything to do with the environment, conservation, research, planning, surveying and tourism.

    I have ideas of going into Glaciology or surprise surprise teaching. :p: Teaching isn't beacuse that's the only career but after helping out in classes at my school, I found it very rewarding. I'm only in first year and new doors are always opening.
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    (Original post by snivellus)
    I'm in my 3rd year of an Msci in Geology. Really, if you don't like rocks, don't do it. I'm not sure why you'd even be considering spending at least 3 years of your life (for the good career prospects you're talking about, you need to do a masters) doing something if you don't like it....

    Geology is 'sciency' and generally has a lot of maths/physics involved. We have practicals in every module for the first 2 years, which is pretty much looking at rocks and thin sections, then some calculations etc. Some modules don't involve looking at rocks at all, but the majority do. There's also lots of fieldwork, which is, you guessed it, looking at rocks. And most acredited courses involve an independent field course lasting around 6 weeks in your final year.... looking at rocks.

    If it helps, I did a-level geography, and a degree in geology is nothing like it at all.... Hell, a-level geology isn't either.
    Are you enjoying it though? even though it;s ased on rocks, do you find what you're actually studying diverse and exciting? If you could do things over, would you still choose your course? I ask because I'm considering turning down a good offer from a good Uni for the sake of reapplying for Geology/Geoscience which at the minute, I'e never studied and don't know much about.

    Also, can anyone tell me how much Geology differes from Geoscience? Is there a similar amoutn of rocks as this poster has outlined or significantly less?

    Thanks

    Edit: And for those doing degrees, can anyone recommened any work experience or things that I can do that'll give me a taste of what it's like? I'm thinking of just going to the libary and looking at some Geology/Geoscience books at degree level.
 
 
 
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