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    Hi guys

    In my quest to learn more of and about the languages of the world and the past, I have decided I want to learn some Latin. Would you be able to point me in the right direction in terms of resources etc, for a beginner in Latin? I'm a linguist and am fine with declensions, grammar, vocab and all the nitty gritty bits, so don't hold back because of that

    The goals are to appreciate more of the history of the languages of Europe and to have an intermediate grasp of the actual language. Any books or sites about Latin's influence on modern languages today or any links to actually learning Latin itself would be greatly appreciated. I particularly want to acquire this knowledge quite rapidly, so that I have some kind of foundation for when I start Uni in October.

    Any help much appreciated and thanks in advance.

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    The Cambridge Latin Course is pretty good, but will probably be a little slow for your aims/ability/age. Reading Latin (Jones and Sidwell) is not a bad choice, but has a few drawbacks (e.g. "interesting" ordering of material) -- of course, said drawbacks can always be overcome. I quite like it. Teach Yourself Latin, despite being part of a mass-market series, seems like a perfectly good choice, too. Wheelock's Latin is a coursebook used widely in the States, so a solid choice. but I would't recommend it purely because it uses the American order of declensions, as opposed that used most often in British books, which can be a bit irksome, because if you memorise the tables you also have to recall that you have the genitive rather than accusative second. Perhaps that's not a major problem, however.

    Of course, you need a good grammar: Kennedy's Revised Latin Primer is the standard, a little dense at times, but being such an ambitious linguist I'm sure that won't pose too many problems. You can always buy Morwood's Oxford grammar too, to get a double perspective (and one that is more accessible).

    In terms of dictionary, the Oxford Pocket Dictionary should be sufficient for your aims.
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    Do the Cambridge Latin Course. If you put in effort (unlike me) it's great! (and funny!) (and about real Romans) (and the most traditional ie respected). You can probably wiz through book 1 pretty fast and then there are another 4
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    Thank you so much for your help, guys. The Revised Latin Primer looks fantastic, and this is the second time I've heard about the Cambridge Latin Course. I always thought it was a bit too poppy though, if you get me.

    In your experiences, how different are Modern and Ancient Greek?
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    I did the Cambridge Latin Course for about a month in my GCSE, my teacher then abandoned it at book II in favour of this. Which was pretty good - had lots of practice opportunities as well as covering the grammar in an understandable way.

    But this is highly recommended, even though you're not planning on doing any exams in it. I currently use the next one up for my AS and am finally understanding Latin by reading it through and going through all the exercises, which are pitched just right; not too easy, not too hard.

    Can't offer any advice on the Greek front i'm afraid.
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    (Original post by Sapientia)
    In your experiences, how different are Modern and Ancient Greek?
    I've only learnt ancient Greek, but I do believe that they vary considerably, especially since 1976 when Dimiotki overtook Katharevousa, a more classicising form, as the standard language. Of coruse, that's not to say that there won't be similarity, just that one wouldn't be able to understand a passage in modern Greek after having learned the ancient language (though may grasp words), or vice versa. Indeed, the pronunciation has changed too (e.g. beta was pronounced /b/, but is now pronounced /v/). I'm sure Wikipedia has an interesting article on the history of Greek as a starting point.
 
 
 
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