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    (Original post by Dude Where's My Username)
    Taking into account money you could have made working in a low skilled job then potentially moving up the ladder that way and non-tuition fee related uni/maintainance expenditure. I just realised I was a right ******* in my original post and was about to delete it till you insta-quoted me :yikes:
    Ill delete mine if you want.
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    ...you're in your final year, right?

    You might as well try to stretch it to a 2:2 as this year counts more, like in my course the first year marks have less weighting than dissertation alone.

    But on a serious note- as long as you get good experience and make good contacts all will be well!
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    (Original post by laurakate1988)
    on the other hand though, i can think of plenty of examples of people who got 1st and 2.1 classifications who have struggled with the job hunt after university.

    Just to put the whole thing in perspective, i think this is worth mentioning
    Sadly true. However, I think whilst 2:1 or 1st classification may not impress an employer, it certainly wouldn't put one off. And a 3rd would.
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    Unfortunately for you a 3rd basically means, you didn't do very well at university.
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    A third in Film Production?!
    Say you went travelling for three years and picked up some work experience or something
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    (Original post by Quady)
    errmmmm you haven't done a degree yet, right?

    You'll get messed over at uni if you take that attitude.
    Nope, but I have a fair few friends at uni. Who all said a 3rd is easy to get. And my mum is a HR manager, who said a 3rd isnt very respectable degree to get. And saying that a 3rd isnt great, and aiming for higher is a bad attitude :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by laurakate1988)
    on the other hand though, i can think of plenty of examples of people who got 1st and 2.1 classifications who have struggled with the job hunt after university.

    Just to put the whole thing in perspective, i think this is worth mentioning
    That's not on the other hand, that's on the same hand as what everyone else is saying.

    That's only further proof that getting a 3rd would make job-hunting extremely difficult.
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    My brothers a level performing arts teacher got CDD in her a levels, and got a 2:2 in Acting without trying exceptionally hard. She then went on to be a teacher as her first job, and, being in London, she started on 24k. 5 years later she was making 35k.

    She earnt more in her first year than her friend who got a 2:1 in economics, and he started on 20k. 5 years later he was on 27k i think, or something around that.

    So don't think that certain degrees and grades mean everything. I don't know why people underestimate teaching, for a graduate its a very high paying job (well in London anyway, you start on about 5k more there than the rest of the country) and its not too hard to go into, you just need to have determination and want to do it.
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    (Original post by joshphillips999)
    My brothers a level performing arts teacher got CDD in her a levels, and got a 2:2 in Acting without trying exceptionally hard. She then went on to be a teacher as her first job, and, being in London, she started on 24k. 5 years later she was making 35k.

    She earnt more in her first year than her friend who got a 2:1 in economics, and he started on 20k. 5 years later he was on 27k i think, or something around that.

    So don't think that certain degrees and grades mean everything. I don't know why people underestimate teaching, for a graduate its a very high paying job (well in London anyway, you start on about 5k more there than the rest of the country) and its not too hard to go into, you just need to have determination and want to do it.
    I'd agree teaching is one of the better choices if you get a 3rd/2.2. But its only average pay for a graduate job. Very high paying would be over 30k.

    Out of curiosity was the economist London based for their job?
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    Just lie say you went to prison for 3 years for GBH and not uni, employers respect hard people.
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    (Original post by joshphillips999)
    My brothers a level performing arts teacher got CDD in her a levels, and got a 2:2 in Acting without trying exceptionally hard. She then went on to be a teacher as her first job, and, being in London, she started on 24k. 5 years later she was making 35k.

    She earnt more in her first year than her friend who got a 2:1 in economics, and he started on 20k. 5 years later he was on 27k i think, or something around that.

    So don't think that certain degrees and grades mean everything. I don't know why people underestimate teaching, for a graduate its a very high paying job (well in London anyway, you start on about 5k more there than the rest of the country) and its not too hard to go into, you just need to have determination and want to do it.

    thanks, this inspires me having got a 2:2 grade in drama.

    I think it's definately more about the person that the grade and the subject. I still managed to get onto an MA course in music and I think it was my enthusiasm for the subject and the music exams I had done at extra curricular level that helped me get into the uni

    I suppose the grade you get in your degree would matter more if you were specifically applying for graduate positions...for example, I didn't apply for any graduate jobs because I didn't feel there was point in competing against those with much better degree grades than me.

    But having said that, yeah, all employment I've found so far has (i think) been based more on my experience and me as a whole person rather than the grade I have on paper (I did a lot of extra curricular outside of my degree so I'm pleased to have a 2:2 with a good band of other qualifications surrounding that rather than a 2:1 or higher standing alone)

    So yes, not getting above a 2:2 might have closed *some* doors but there are still enough ones that appeal that are wide open to me. By all means try to get the best grade possible but please don't think it's game over if your grade isn't outstanding
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    (Original post by Quady)
    I'd agree teaching is one of the better choices if you get a 3rd/2.2. But its only average pay for a graduate job. Very high paying would be over 30k.

    Out of curiosity was the economist London based for their job?
    I guess I did exaggerate when I said "very high", because its not exceptionally high, but it goes up very quickly, most teachers in London would be at 35k in 5 years as long as they don't muck up. Then if they are a good teacher they could be earning a lot more in later years if you go up from the main payscale to the post-threshold payscale. The mani payscale takes around 5 years and the the post-threshold payscale usually takes about 6 years to get passed (obviously it goes through the pay gradually in a payscale, this will make more sense when you see the link), then they can get "advanced skills teacher" status etc. etc. which could be 50k after teaching for say, 10-15 years (but you would actually have to be a very good teacher, thats not just something you do from time, its actually assessed on how good you are). Then if you become a dep. head/head of the school it just sky rockets into the 60s, 70s, and 80s and potentially 110k in inner London for a head. But obviously that last bit is being pretty optimistic, unless you've been there say, 20+ years atleast. So what I mean by saying its well paid is that you get lots of opportunities to be very well paid. Plus its good money for the amount of time which you work, which is less than many professions. But you do need to want to do it. Thats the only problem. But I guess I am quite biased because teaching is what I want to do when I'm older. And I think I would enjoy it, but not everyone would.

    http://www.tda.gov.uk/Recruit/lifeas...aryscales.aspx - Thats the payscales. I live in outer London so you can see why its good to do it here and not outside London :P:

    And the job the guy had, I think it was something in accounting because the job market for that kind of stuff has never been too open, its always been quite competitive, especially in the past few years.

    But making it more relevent to the thread, not everyone is very intelligent, a 3rd is better than no degree at all, Teaching proves that as you would earn much more with even a third than without a degree at all. I don't think you would make that much money in many other professions which require a degree, because you really would need some star-quality to make up for it.
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    (Original post by joshphillips999)
    Plus its good money for the amount of time which you work, which is less than many professions.
    It always amazes me that people still think that teachers work short hours. Especially people who want to be teachers...
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    (Original post by Pink Bullets)
    It always amazes me that people still think that teachers work short hours. Especially people who want to be teachers...
    As someone who volunteers regularly in a secondary school, I completely agree.

    The teaching pay is really not that generous given the amount teachers work and have to put up with. At an office, you could sit and doze off for the majority of the day, and only work properly for 2-3 hours. Each minute spent with children requires you to be on your feet, subjected to constant disruptive behaviour and overall unwillingness to learn. There's a reason why 2 out of 5 teachers quit teaching within 3 years of qualifying. It's not an easy job.
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    (Original post by Pink Bullets)
    It always amazes me that people still think that teachers work short hours. Especially people who want to be teachers...
    They don't work short hours, I know that. But they have holidays off. Some of which is spent marking work etc., but its more freedom of when you want to do it and at the pace you want, its in your own time. What I meant to say is they work less days, not work less hours (which for me I would prefer).
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    (Original post by Meh.)
    As someone who volunteers regularly in a secondary school, I completely agree.

    The teaching pay is really not that generous given the amount teachers work and have to put up with. At an office, you could sit and doze off for the majority of the day, and only work properly for 2-3 hours. Each minute spent with children requires you to be on your feet, subjected to constant disruptive behaviour and overall unwillingness to learn. There's a reason why 2 out of 5 teachers quit teaching within 3 years of qualifying. It's not an easy job.
    Lol someone who works in an office doesnt do that little pure work. All my office jobs (4/5) myself and coworkers have spent the entire time fighting the workload and valuing the hour lunch (sometimes i only got half an hour). Ill give you a couple of times ive had the office to myself and done some slacking off but max about half an hour throughout the day so with an hour lunch and working 8 hours a day thats still 6 and a half hours minimum
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    (Original post by Meh.)
    As someone who volunteers regularly in a secondary school, I completely agree.

    The teaching pay is really not that generous given the amount teachers work and have to put up with. At an office, you could sit and doze off for the majority of the day, and only work properly for 2-3 hours. Each minute spent with children requires you to be on your feet, subjected to constant disruptive behaviour and overall unwillingness to learn. There's a reason why 2 out of 5 teachers quit teaching within 3 years of qualifying. It's not an easy job.
    Well it depends which way you see it, generally teachers which make their lessons interesting and are good with managing kids would find it easier and would be better teachers. The key is making them want to learn by offering rewards and creating more interesting activities instead of answering questions from a book. My chemistry teacher is smart, but she brings out the textbooks in every 1/2 lessons, we rarely do practicals, and her lessons are overall fairly drab. She would also give out detentions fairly quickly and would just moan at them if they were being uncooperative.
    My Geography teacher follows the textbook in terms of the things we learn and keeps the lessons based on the curriculum, however we rarely use the textbooks and often we do group work and she explains stuff really well by simplifying it at first and using comparisons to other things, then making it more complicated and higher level, and her lessons are brilliant. She rarely gives out detetions, because she doesn't need to, and if she was to give you a detention for not doing homework, if the student simply didn't understand it she would give up somne of her own time to help them to do it and would lift the detention, unless they refused to do the homework after giving enough chances.

    It often is better if your teaching a non-compulsory subject though, as you would have kids which chose to do the subject and so are more likely to want to learn than if they hadn't chosen it.

    Also if you don't really like kids then you shouldn't be doing the job, like I said, it has to be something you want to do and you would need to be pretty determined to do it. Unfortunately there are some schools where the students are utterly terrible, though, and sometimes you can't work around them.
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    (Original post by joshphillips999)
    I guess I did exaggerate when I said "very high", because its not exceptionally high, but it goes up very quickly, most teachers in London would be at 35k in 5 years as long as they don't muck up. Then if they are a good teacher they could be earning a lot more in later years if you go up from the main payscale to the post-threshold payscale. The mani payscale takes around 5 years and the the post-threshold payscale usually takes about 6 years to get passed (obviously it goes through the pay gradually in a payscale, this will make more sense when you see the link), then they can get "advanced skills teacher" status etc. etc. which could be 50k after teaching for say, 10-15 years (but you would actually have to be a very good teacher, thats not just something you do from time, its actually assessed on how good you are). Then if you become a dep. head/head of the school it just sky rockets into the 60s, 70s, and 80s and potentially 110k in inner London for a head. But obviously that last bit is being pretty optimistic, unless you've been there say, 20+ years atleast. So what I mean by saying its well paid is that you get lots of opportunities to be very well paid. Plus its good money for the amount of time which you work, which is less than many professions. But you do need to want to do it. Thats the only problem. But I guess I am quite biased because teaching is what I want to do when I'm older. And I think I would enjoy it, but not everyone would.

    http://www.tda.gov.uk/Recruit/lifeas...aryscales.aspx - Thats the payscales. I live in outer London so you can see why its good to do it here and not outside London :P:

    And the job the guy had, I think it was something in accounting because the job market for that kind of stuff has never been too open, its always been quite competitive, especially in the past few years.

    But making it more relevent to the thread, not everyone is very intelligent, a 3rd is better than no degree at all, Teaching proves that as you would earn much more with even a third than without a degree at all. I don't think you would make that much money in many other professions which require a degree, because you really would need some star-quality to make up for it.
    Since I'll be on 32k two years after graduating and 45k ish after five years OUT of London I don't find it too incredible. But yes, its good for someone with a 3rd.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Since I'll be on 32k two years after graduating and 45k ish after five years OUT of London I don't find it too incredible. But yes, its good for someone with a 3rd.
    Wow, that is good. Are you studying medicine?
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    (Original post by joshphillips999)
    Wow, that is good. Are you studying medicine?
    Civil Service Fast Stream, I did chemistry. Its hardly top of the league though, but yeah its above average.
 
 
 
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