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    Need help with something please:confused:
    Halogenoalkanes, specifically fluorine has a very high electro-negativity right. So it pulls away form the carbon, and has a need to ionize (i think right?) but it doesn't. it doesn't pull away and become an ion, why doesn't it?
    Does it have anything to do with bond enthalpy, and whats does it mean about the negative inductive effect it has??
    Please and thank you
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    (Original post by Memorable_Life)
    Need help with something please:confused:
    Halogenoalkanes, specifically fluorine has a very high electro-negativity right. So it pulls away form the carbon, and has a need to ionize (i think right?) but it doesn't. it doesn't pull away and become an ion, why doesn't it?
    Does it have anything to do with bond enthalpy, and whats does it mean about the negative inductive effect it has??
    Please and thank you
    Negative inductive effect, as you say, means the ability to withdraw electrons towards itself through the bonds. This is due to its electronegativity (which is defined in a similar way).

    The bond itself is too strong to break so the result of the -I effect is bond polarisation, not rupture.
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    (Original post by charco)
    Negative inductive effect, as you say, means the ability to withdraw electrons towards itself through the bonds. This is due to its electronegativity (which is defined in a similar way).

    The bond itself is too strong to break so the result of the -I effect is bond polarisation, not rupture.
    Thanks a lot man, this means say polarity vs enthalpy , enthalpy is more important in terms of experiments or whatever. Because the bond enthalpy is what keeps the fluorine from ionizing?? have i got that right?
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    (Original post by Memorable_Life)
    Thanks a lot man, this means say polarity vs enthalpy , enthalpy is more important in terms of experiments or whatever. Because the bond enthalpy is what keeps the fluorine from ionizing?? have i got that right?
    Essentially the enthalpy is what keeps almost any bond together. However, that doesn't mean you're necessarily to think of ionisation as opposing bonding. The bond has ionic character which contributes to its strength. If you do physics you may know that F = -\frac{q_1q_2}{4\pi \epsilon_0 r^2} where F is the force holding your ions together.

    You get many inorganic ionic solids (e.g. salt) and there's some very important organic ones that are formed with very electropositive metals like sodium.
 
 
 
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