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Vinyl to MP3 watch

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    For my dad's 50th birthday my mum has bought him an iPod, and I have the task of putting his record collection onto it. We have a record player, it has a normal red and white stereo output, but my laptop only has a single input, as does my desktop.
    First question, is there some sort of adapter for the red and white stereo cables (they probably have a proper name, which slips my mind) to go into a single mini jack line in thing? And where might I find such a thing? Or is there some sort of cheap USB sound card that would be better for this?
    Secondly, can anyone recommend some software for recording the line in? For Windows Vista or Linux. Ideally, I would like something that is able to split tracks at silent parts, so that I don't have to split them all myself. I shall have a look around myself, but any recommendations would be great.
    Thanks


    Edit: Phono seems to be the word I was looking for in regards to the red and white cable, so something like this would seem to be what I'm after. However, I've also been reading about needing a pre-amp as turntables with a magnetic cartridge (as a Google search reveals this as appearing to be) do not output a loud enough volume to record directly from a PC line-in. Apparently, running it through a normal hi-fi system will work (as that is how the turntable was originally connected), but, I'm wondering if running it through a guitar amp will also work? The amp has a 6.35mm input and output, so using the same sort of adapter as above but a 6.35mm version for the input, and then a 6.35mm to 3.5mm jack output to the line in of the PC, will this work?
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    If you have stereo Microphone Input, you can buy A Phono to Stereo 3.5mm jack wire for next to nothing. Then all you need is Recording Software (There's plenty of free Stuff available, I would suggest Audacity) Just make sure it can record stereo. I would definitely advise against using a guitar amp, as they will always add distortion and are only designed for Mono. Also, make sure you don't have the gain on your Chosen Pre-amp too high to avoid electronic distortion, and then Normalising the Recorded Audio in your software.
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    You don't need to record from the line in, your PC will have a microphone jack too which should work better for your turntable. You can run it through the amp if you prefer, in which case you'll need to find out what outputs the amp has, if any, that you can use. I'd personally avoid using a guitar amp as they're designed for (surprise, surprise) guitars, so you could lose sound quality (plus it'll come out mono).

    As for software, Audacity is freely available, though I don't think it'll automatically split tracks. Saying that, you'll probably want to go through them manually anyway to cut out any blank audio, which is something Audacity certainly does do. :yep:
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    Yeh a little research suggested using a guitar amp was a bad idea. I think I may just run it through the hifi, as it has a phono input and that way all I need is a 6.35mm to 3.5mm jack adapter for the output which I already have.
    I wasn't sure whether the mic input would be OK to use, I thought it might be designed specifically for voice frequencies, but if it is fine, that makes things a little easier, rather than bringing the hifi to my desktop with a line-in, I can take my laptop with a mic input to the hifi.

    I shall have a look at Audacity, think I've used it a few years back. Will also continue looking for something to automatically split tracks, as it's going to be a real pain splitting them individually..although perhaps a little easier if the vinyl covers have track times listed.
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    The mic input is designed for mic levels, as opposed to line level. The former can be thought of as "quieter" than the latter, though its a bit more complicated than that in reality. Anyway, if you're using the headphone output of your amp, then that should be connected to the mic in on your PC, as it is most certainly not a line level signal.
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    There are USB Vinyl to MP3 converters available that would provide better quality Products, but they aren't a low cost option.
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    Well I guess I shall give the mic input a try and see how it sounds then.
    I have seen the USB turntables, but yeh I was looking for a cheaper option. I have contacted my friend who is a DJ to see if he has one I might be able to borrow, but he has yet to get back to me.
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    Crap turntable = crap sound quality, and from what I've seen of USB turntables they usually fall under this category. The USB connection will of course filter out the noise between the source and your PC, but if the turntable is producing bad quality audio to begin with you haven't really achieved much.
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    That's why I recommend a Vinyl to MP3 Converter. They have phono input which you can connect to your existing turntable, they contain the Amplifier within to remove interference from additional amplification and maximise the sound level being converted, they naturally filter some of the grainy Vinyl sound, and come with the necessary software.
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    Just thought I'd say now that I have given it a go, running the turntable through the hifi and then into the mic input of my laptop works perfectly! The silence finder analyser is also able to add labels at the silences and export the labelled points to multiple tracks, so I don't need to split them manually (although, the first record I did it with had an interview with some gaps in, which is now spread across 4 tracks, and I can't seem to work out how to remove a label :confused: think I'll just have to put the peices together again manually). Audacity is excellent, can also fill in most of the ID3 tags for me, I just need to name the tracks, I'm hoping there is some sort of database for records and some software that can do this, much like can connect to a database, find a CD and fill in information. I shall have a hunt. Thanks for your help and suggestions guys!

    Edit: Found how to delete labels.
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    (Original post by hobo06)
    Just thought I'd say now that I have given it a go, running the turntable through the hifi and then into the mic input of my laptop works perfectly! The silence finder analyser is also able to add labels at the silences and export the labelled points to multiple tracks, so I don't need to split them manually (although, the first record I did it with had an interview with some gaps in, which is now spread across 4 tracks, and I can't seem to work out how to remove a label :confused: think I'll just have to put the peices together again manually). Audacity is excellent, can also fill in most of the ID3 tags for me, I just need to name the tracks, I'm hoping there is some sort of database for records and some software that can do this, much like can connect to a database, find a CD and fill in information. I shall have a hunt. Thanks for your help and suggestions guys!

    Edit: Found how to delete labels.
    I usually use MusicBrainz for tagging, it's designed for CDs though so I'm not sure what it's like for vinyl releases. :woo:
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    why not just download the library in a digital format, unless they are really obscure, you'll find most of it online...
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    Downloading it isn't really the same as the time and effort put into something so personal. And whilst digital versions of all the tracks are no doubt available somewhere, many of the tracks there are several different versions, finding the original vinyl recording in digital format will probably be a bit more difficult.
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    yeah true, but the quality with inevitably be compromised. quality wins every time for me
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    (Original post by crazyjoyce)
    yeah true, but the quality with inevitably be compromised. quality wins every time for me
    The quality of vinyl is far superior to digital copies you'll get off the web. Vinyl has a perfect analogue recording of the song being performed, a CD has at best a digital representation of the former. MP3s off the Internet will inevitably be worse quality than CDs, so stand no chance really.

    Trust me, if you'd heard a proper turntable system, you'd never buy another CD again.
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    (Original post by Dez)
    The quality of vinyl is far superior to digital copies you'll get off the web. Vinyl has a perfect analogue recording of the song being performed, a CD has at best a digital representation of the former. MP3s off the Internet will inevitably be worse quality than CDs, so stand no chance really.

    Trust me, if you'd heard a proper turntable system, you'd never buy another CD again.
    Whilst I generally agree with what you're saying, it's a bit of a stretch to call a format known for hisses and pops (endearingly or otherwise) a "perfect" copy...
    [/pedant]
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    (Original post by majikthise)
    Whilst I generally agree with what you're saying, it's a bit of a stretch to call a format known for hisses and pops (endearingly or otherwise) a "perfect" copy...
    [/pedant]
    Okay, I may have romanticised it slightly. :daydreaming: Mainly because of the constant battle in our local student radio station to throw away all of their old vinyl albums. Philistines. :p:
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    The main problem with they way I'm doing it of course is noise picked up (although Audacity's Noise Remover is brilliant), and damage to the records themselves due to age. I can't seem to find a date on most of them, but one box set Elvis Presley one is dated 1970 (and one record in particular in that set I did have a bit of a problem with the needle not moving at one point and repeated the same part over and over). No doubt, with the amount of Elvis records my dad has, some of them will pre-date the box set.

    I fear the click remover of Audacity though, the default settings don't always remove all clicks, and I don't want to fiddle with them in fear of it doing something wrong and removing more than clicks.
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    (Original post by Dez)
    The quality of vinyl is far superior to digital copies you'll get off the web. Vinyl has a perfect analogue recording of the song being performed, a CD has at best a digital representation of the former. MP3s off the Internet will inevitably be worse quality than CDs, so stand no chance really.

    Trust me, if you'd heard a proper turntable system, you'd never buy another CD again.
    320kbps mp3 vs ripped vinyl through some crap PC soundcard...

    320 from torrents is the norm if you know where to look

    trust me, i know what an audiophile grade set up sounds like, and i'd choose an mp3 over a bad vinyl rip any day
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    (Original post by crazyjoyce)
    320kbps mp3 vs ripped vinyl through some crap PC soundcard...

    320 from torrents is the norm if you know where to look

    trust me, i know what an audiophile grade set up sounds like, and i'd choose an mp3 over a bad vinyl rip any day
    Wait, you're telling me that you can find reasonable quality torrents for albums released in the '50s? And these won't in fact be ripped from vinyl, with a "crap PC soundcard" as you put it, in the first place? And that this is all legal? Oh wait. :rolleyes:
 
 
 
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