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Is there a delay between thinking of moving a body part and it moving..? watch

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    The title basically asks it all, is there a delay, I'd expect so but is how much is it, for our nerves to send the message to move..?
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    I think I heard once that they did tests and found that the message gets sent a tiny bit before you actually think about moving. I have no reliable source for this though.
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    Slight delay, look up the rate of travel of impulses along myelinated human neurones, and do your own estimate.
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    For a normal action it's a fraction of a second, and for reflex actions it's even shorter than that (described as "nearly instantaneous" ) as the signal is relayed via the spinal cord instead of the brain. If you want a precise time though, I don't know.
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    generally reaction time is considered to about 0.2-0.3 secs. However that is time for your brain to process a visual/audio change and then tell your muscle to react. There are some body actions that aren't regulated by the brain and are thus quicker. For example if you touch something hot your body immediately reacts by tensing the muscles in the region that felt the hot object, which is why they suggest you check infront of yourself with the back of your hand during a fire, as if you used the front, your body would instinctively tense the muscles, thus grabbing the hot object in your hand and hurting yourself. If you touch with the back, your muscles tense causing your arm to be pulled away from the hot object.
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    I've wanted to move my left arm to my right and my right arm to my left, but that was 11 years ago and they're still in the same positions...
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    (Original post by Rubgish)
    generally reaction time is considered to about 0.2-0.3 secs. However that is time for your brain to process a visual/audio change and then tell your muscle to react. There are some body actions that aren't regulated by the brain and are thus quicker. For example if you touch something hot your body immediately reacts by tensing the muscles in the region that felt the hot object, which is why they suggest you check infront of yourself with the back of your hand during a fire, as if you used the front, your body would instinctively tense the muscles, thus grabbing the hot object in your hand and hurting yourself. If you touch with the back, your muscles tense causing your arm to be pulled away from the hot object.
    True but i thought you used the back of your hand as its more sensitive than your fingers/palm.
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    (Original post by Rubgish)
    For example if you touch something hot your body immediately reacts by tensing the muscles in the region that felt the hot object, which is why they suggest you check infront of yourself with the back of your hand during a fire, as if you used the front, your body would instinctively tense the muscles, thus grabbing the hot object in your hand and hurting yourself. If you touch with the back, your muscles tense causing your arm to be pulled away from the hot object.
    I think you're getting confused with electric wires. The electrical shock can either cause muscles contract, which can cause you not to be able to let go of the wire on an electric fence. This is why they have changed electrical fences to 'pulse' instead of giving a sustained electric shock.
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    Split second...
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    (Original post by Schismist)
    I think you're getting confused with electric wires. The electrical shock can either cause muscles contract, which can cause you not to be able to let go of the wire on an electric fence. This is why they have changed electrical fences to 'pulse' instead of giving a sustained electric shock.
    What you said is also true, but it occurs for sudden changes in heat too. If you've ever seen someone spill boiling water on themselves they jump like crazy when it happens.
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    yeh there's a delay, we did this in biology not so long ago, can't remember the exact figure though. But I'd imagine it changes according to the body condition (age, health condition, stress levels etc)
 
 
 
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