Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Uea Or Essex..straight Economics, Which To Choose?? watch

Announcements
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    I wouldn't say Essex has a lower reputation than the others, in the academic world Essex is seen as a big hitter especially for Economics, Sociology and Politics it is right up there with the best.

    Out of all the league tables the RAE is the main one to go off for departmental (or university) power because it shows the research strength

    http://www.timeshighereducation.co.u...HE_RESULTS.pdf

    If you ignore the two specialised medical ones up the top who are only included in a couple of units of assessment, the overall hierachy is:
    Cambridge, LSE, Oxford, Imperial, UCL, Manchester, Warwick, York, Essex, Edinburgh

    Economics is on page 8 and the hierachy for research quality there is:
    LSE, UCL, Essex/Oxford/Warwick, Bristol/Nottingham/Queen Mary, Cambridge/Manchester

    Look at Essex scores for Accounting & Finance, Politics and Sociology and you will see it is a dominant university in all the related fields.

    If you're doing Economics then I would presume you are looking at a career in something related afterwards, have no doubts that its reputation is well known.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    I wouldn't say Essex has a lower reputation than the others, in the academic world Essex is seen as a big hitter especially for Economics, Sociology and Politics it is right up there with the best.

    Out of all the league tables the RAE is the main one to go off for departmental (or university) power because it shows the research strength

    http://www.timeshighereducation.co.u...HE_RESULTS.pdf

    If you ignore the two specialised medical ones up the top who are only included in a couple of units of assessment, the overall hierachy is:
    Cambridge, LSE, Oxford, Imperial, UCL, Manchester, Warwick, York, Essex, Edinburgh

    Economics is on page 8 and the hierachy for research quality there is:
    LSE, UCL, Essex/Oxford/Warwick, Bristol/Nottingham/Queen Mary, Cambridge/Manchester

    Look at Essex scores for Accounting & Finance, Politics and Sociology and you will see it is a dominant university in all the related fields.

    If you're doing Economics then I would presume you are looking at a career in something related afterwards, have no doubts that its reputation is well known.
    Here is just the econ RAE data in bigger scale:
    http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/economic...0Scotland.html

    One thing about Essex is that since then a lot of very good Essex people have left: including 2 to Warwick and atleast 2 to Cambridge. So the Essex position is now an over estimate.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Paulwhy)
    Here is just the econ RAE data in bigger scale:
    http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/economic...0Scotland.html

    One thing about Essex is that since then a lot of very good Essex people have left: including 2 to Warwick and atleast 2 to Cambridge. So the Essex position is now an over estimate.
    Interesting insight. However in the context of the institutions being talked about here I think it's fair to say Essex is the best option. Also in terms of undergraduate degrees the curriculum tends to be fairly constant despite the arrival and departures of big hitting researchers, and most employers won't be as well informed as people on the inside of academia so their perceptions of 'reputation' will lag behind, hence departments trading off their RAE score for years.
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    Interesting insight. However in the context of the institutions being talked about here I think it's fair to say Essex is the best option. Also in terms of undergraduate degrees the curriculum tends to be fairly constant despite the arrival and departures of big hitting researchers, and most employers won't be as well informed as people on the inside of academia so their perceptions of 'reputation' will lag behind, hence departments trading off their RAE score for years.
    Yep if someone was going in for graduate studies then i think Essex's position in RAE would matter a fair deal and would be the best option however for undergrad it matters alot less thus i wouldn't group it with first tier unis like Warwick and Oxbridge nor second with the likes of Birmingham. Even if the TC wished to pursue a job as an economist he would need at least an Msc plus where he did his undergrad would not be very relevant.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CrookedLegs)
    Ahh right gotcha, I can see your reasoning. Yeah I suppose it depends how much weight you want to put on either side - university reputation or course reputation. Personally, I'd go for Leicester as its the most respected out of those five, it has a pretty good economics course and Leicester city centre is quite nice. But yeah, I'd say all five of those would be good choices and you're lucky to have offers from all of them. Well done.
    thanks for your help, really appreciated!

    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    I wouldn't say Essex has a lower reputation than the others, in the academic world Essex is seen as a big hitter especially for Economics, Sociology and Politics it is right up there with the best.

    Out of all the league tables the RAE is the main one to go off for departmental (or university) power because it shows the research strength

    http://www.timeshighereducation.co.u...HE_RESULTS.pdf

    If you ignore the two specialised medical ones up the top who are only included in a couple of units of assessment, the overall hierachy is:
    Cambridge, LSE, Oxford, Imperial, UCL, Manchester, Warwick, York, Essex, Edinburgh

    Economics is on page 8 and the hierachy for research quality there is:
    LSE, UCL, Essex/Oxford/Warwick, Bristol/Nottingham/Queen Mary, Cambridge/Manchester

    Look at Essex scores for Accounting & Finance, Politics and Sociology and you will see it is a dominant university in all the related fields.

    If you're doing Economics then I would presume you are looking at a career in something related afterwards, have no doubts that its reputation is well known.
    thank you, your point is the reason i have been swayed to essex, but will i experience this great research at undergraduate? or will i expect to see it at post-graduate..

    (Original post by Paulwhy)
    Here is just the econ RAE data in bigger scale:
    http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/economic...0Scotland.html

    One thing about Essex is that since then a lot of very good Essex people have left: including 2 to Warwick and atleast 2 to Cambridge. So the Essex position is now an over estimate.
    Thanks a lot, despite them losing these members of department, would you still say that the department is still relatively strong?
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Yep if someone was going in for graduate studies then i think Essex's position in RAE would matter a fair deal and would be the best option however for undergrad it matters alot less thus i wouldn't group it with first tier unis like Warwick and Oxbridge nor second with the likes of Birmingham. Even if the TC wished to pursue a job as an economist he would need at least an Msc plus where he did his undergrad would not be very relevant.
    I would group Essex overall in the second tier of universities, ie along with those at the top end of the Russell Group. It is pretty consistent in its quality however it doesn't have that many undergrad applicants hence is easier to get into than the other top quality institutions. Probably this is because its neither a big city with a social buzz nor a beautiful campus. The same could be said about Warwick of course but at the moment Warwick is the only one of the newer brigade who's been able to break into the top tier, probably because compared to Essex, it has developed strength over a much wider range of departments, and also its strong points are the disciplines which feed into the financial sector, ie economics, maths, business, statistics. Essexs strength is economics, politics, sociology, philosophy,etc
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yonni18)
    Thanks a lot, despite them losing these members of department, would you still say that the department is still relatively strong?
    I don't know: I just know of a number of leavers.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I would go to RHUL>Leicster>Essex>UEA>Sussex tbh.

    The RAE will not make a big difference for U deegrad studies, plus where you do your under grad studies isn't relevant at all for your MSc, Ive heard I people do Economics at London South Bank and then their MSc Econ at UCL!

    Tbh, RHUL and Leicster have the edge in grad prospects, RHUL more so, depending on which industry you go into, RHUL is better known, especially in Investment Banking.

    Also look at PaulWhy's TAELT if you haven't already, has everything from newspaper position to starting salary!

    Good luck!
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yonni18)
    thank you, your point is the reason i have been swayed to essex, but will i experience this great research at undergraduate? or will i expect to see it at post-graduate..
    No you won't really experience much connected with the cutting edge research at undergraduate level anywhere, because its a level above what undergrads would be able to understand - at MSc it might start to make sense. Going to a department which has a strong research record at undergraduate level is basically advantageous because:

    - the department will generally be well resourced, it will have good research money coming in and top academics don't like being in places with poor facilities

    - your CV will look good with a degree from that department on it, because those in your field will be aware of who the top places are to study

    - you may be able to get an academic reference from somebody who is well respected in the field - very useful for applying for funding for postgrad

    - the curriculum won't differ widely at UG level from place to place but at the top places they will be preparing you for their MSc programmes which is an advantage if you want to stay on. Also as a general rule, if you get a 2:1, they will accept you for their own MSc.

    - you may be working with tutors who are well connected in industry, if you show talent, they can be a good networking source
    • PS Helper
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    PS Helper
    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    No you won't really experience much connected with the cutting edge research at undergraduate level anywhere, because its a level above what undergrads would be able to understand - at MSc it might start to make sense. Going to a department which has a strong research record at undergraduate level is basically advantageous because:

    - the department will generally be well resourced, it will have good research money coming in and top academics don't like being in places with poor facilities

    - your CV will look good with a degree from that department on it, because those in your field will be aware of who the top places are to study

    - you may be able to get an academic reference from somebody who is well respected in the field - very useful for applying for funding for postgrad

    - the curriculum won't differ widely at UG level from place to place but at the top places they will be preparing you for their MSc programmes which is an advantage if you want to stay on. Also as a general rule, if you get a 2:1, they will accept you for their own MSc.

    - you may be working with tutors who are well connected in industry, if you show talent, they can be a good networking source
    Actually after speaking to someone at Cambridge doing an Msc atm, he said they dont take their own undergrads even if they get 2:1 (obviously strictly speaking if your on 69% they may still accept you) but the general rule is a 1st.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Actually after speaking to someone at Cambridge doing an Msc atm, he said they dont take their own undergrads even if they get 2:1 (obviously strictly speaking if your on 69% they may still accept you) but the general rule is a 1st.
    At the Uni of Surrey open day we met a guy that got into Camb for his MSc, all because he came top of the year with something like 83% and a glowing reference, needless to say he was Chinese and ******* hard working!
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by yoyo462001)
    Actually after speaking to someone at Cambridge doing an Msc atm, he said they dont take their own undergrads even if they get 2:1 (obviously strictly speaking if your on 69% they may still accept you) but the general rule is a 1st.
    Msc Economics entry requirements are covered in this sticky thread in the postgraduate forum:
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=896049
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hamzab)
    I would go to RHUL>Leicster>Essex>UEA>Sussex tbh.

    The RAE will not make a big difference for U deegrad studies, plus where you do your under grad studies isn't relevant at all for your MSc, Ive heard I people do Economics at London South Bank and then their MSc Econ at UCL!
    This is only partly true. You get very different training at top-tier Universities than what you would get from those lagging far behind - especially teaching led ones. The main difference is that in the former you are being taught by researchers (people who make economics), whereas in the latter mostly from teachers (people who try to interpret economics - not always successfuly).

    Of course it doesn't mean that you won't have opportunities if you do your undergrad in the latter, but don't expect the same level of training, academics, or facilities.

    Having said that, when it comes to choosing an economics department you need to consider your interests. Some departments are very strong in economic theory (e.g. Leicester and Essex) but have very few researchers working on applied economics. Others specialise on applied economics (e.g. LSE and Lancaster). UEA is probably the best place you can study Europe-wide if you are interested in behavioural economics.

    Conclusion: rankings (though important) only say part of the story. Coming from the horse's mouth.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: February 6, 2011
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.