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    I've recently been thinking about pursuing a job in the EU, most likely the Commission, after I graduate. I originally wanted to work for the UN but I feel like the EU would allow me to actually make more of a difference. Anyway, I was wondering what kind of prospects there were for applying straight out of university to work in Europe? I've done a fair amount of research and I understand the admissions process (several stages of exams followed by interviews) but I'm aware that most applicants are at least in their thirties. I'm really asking any graduates who have applied to work within the EU or anyone who knows anything about it what my chances are?

    I'm currently a first year (early I know) studying history/politics at Warwick. I intend to do an Erasmus year in France and hopefully come back speaking fluent French, as well as apply for the graduate internship at the Commission.

    Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Callum
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    hi!
    Sounds like you've made some really good plans!!
    I'm currently doing an internship at the European Commission and would highly recommend that you apply. The internships at the Commission and the European Parliament are last for 5 months and are paid. Being an intern give you a really good insight to what its liket to work inside a European Institution. Many of the permanent staff have previously done an internship and it really helps when you've passed the long application process ( doesnt automatically mean you'll get a job...) that you know ppl inside the the Commission/EP who can recommend you. One thing though, all interns Ive met so far has an MSc... its def worth applying after your BA but its competative and it might be hard to get an internship without a Masters. However, there doesnt seem to be to many British ppl who apply so its def worth applying even if you decide that you wont do an MSc.
    You do need to have two EU languages ( English and French would be perfect!) so that Erasmus year sounds like a good idea.You should also look into the Civil Service Fast Stream ( Europe option).
    Let me know if you have an more questions!
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    What kind of job would you want to do there?

    As for making a difference - I am rather sceptical of the European Commission, the alleged monumental corruption within it, the bullying of countries that are impudent enough to say "no" in referenda, the petty laws it passes about whether we're allowed to call our chocolate "chocolate", etc. etc. Personally, if making a difference was what motivated me, I'd apply to the UN, bearing in mind that my chances would be small given the ratio of applicants to jobs.
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    (Original post by freemover)
    hi!
    Sounds like you've made some really good plans!!
    I'm currently doing an internship at the European Commission and would highly recommend that you apply. The internships at the Commission and the European Parliament are last for 5 months and are paid. Being an intern give you a really good insight to what its liket to work inside a European Institution. Many of the permanent staff have previously done an internship and it really helps when you've passed the long application process ( doesnt automatically mean you'll get a job...) that you know ppl inside the the Commission/EP who can recommend you. One thing though, all interns Ive met so far has an MSc... its def worth applying after your BA but its competative and it might be hard to get an internship without a Masters. However, there doesnt seem to be to many British ppl who apply so its def worth applying even if you decide that you wont do an MSc.
    You do need to have two EU languages ( English and French would be perfect!) so that Erasmus year sounds like a good idea.You should also look into the Civil Service Fast Stream ( Europe option).
    Let me know if you have an more questions!
    I wondered about a masters, am I right in thinking that most European countries' standard degrees are four years? Presumably that's why I would need one? If I were to apply for a masters, are there any particular fields that would stand me in better stead for internship?
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    Politics, Law or Economics seems to be the most common. However, I know they are also looking for people who has for example a science background. But I want to emphasise that having a Masters degree is not a formal requirement ( sorry dont know how to spell that, non native speaker...). Good luck and let me know if you have any more questions about internships or Masters ( I have an MSc in Politics and Government in the EU)
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    (Original post by freemover)
    Politics, Law or Economics seems to be the most common. However, I know they are also looking for people who has for example a science background. But I want to emphasise that having a Masters degree is not a formal requirement ( sorry dont know how to spell that, non native speaker...). Good luck and let me know if you have any more questions about internships or Masters ( I have an MSc in Politics and Government in the EU)
    Yeah from what I've seen it's not a formal requirement, however career progression seems to be limited if you only have a 3-year degree from what I can understand from the EPSO website, so I may as well get a masters now while I'm a student rather than in ten years if I do eventually get a job in the EU. I will probably try and find a masters that focuses on the EU, since I don't have much of a science background to work with. But thanks a lot, you've been a great help
 
 
 
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