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    I have to give in my A level choices in a few weeks. After only recently getting my mock results back I'm starting to worry about my choice of subjects. My GCSE options were history, geography and electronics aswell as all the other usual ones (triple award science btw.) My mock results are all A*s with a couple of As in english lit and lang. I'ma iming to bump these up in the real exams and hopefully will get 10 A*s in total.

    Im not certain about a future career or what i want to study at university. I'm leaning towards either medicine or law. This leaves me with some difficult decisions over a levels as both professions require different types of skills and qualifications.

    Initially without thinking about careers and uni i would choose maths, physics, biology and chemistry. This combination would be suitable for medicine I think however I don't want to put all my eggs in one basket as I'm also interested in law.

    Do you think it would be worthwile to do an essay subject? If I did do science and maths would i find it hard getting on an undergraduate law degree course?

    Here are the subjects I'm picking from for my A levels:
    Maths, Physics, Biology, Chemistry, English, History, Critical thinking.(as an extra which i will do if i do well in As exam this summer)

    Idealy I would choose sciences and maths. But I'm fearful that this might rule me out of getting into do law at top uni's e.g oxbridge. I have read on uni sites that people who do maths and science subjects at a level do just as well as students who have done essay subjects at a level.

    I'm thinking I may have to hedge my bets and go for Chem, Bio, maths and eng lit or hist (plus critical thinking).Although this would be a shame as I love physics.

    Thanks in advance for your replies
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    Unfortunately, if you want to get into Oxbridge, your best bet is to put all your eggs in one basket. If you were to do three sciences and an essay based subject, you would probably struggle to get into Oxbridge for law. Likewise, if you choose only a couple of sciences, you are going to have a hard time getting into a course in medicine. I would have a serious think about it over the next few days, and then just go with your gut. I study maths, chemistry, physics and biology, and couldn't be more pleased with my choices. If those are your favourite subjects, go with them. Spreading yourself thin over a broad range of subjects is actually going to restrict your options more than anything.
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    I would say two sciences and English Literature. Medicine courses require two sciences, and top university's now look for all rounders. I would say Biology, Chemistry, English Literature and then Maths and then you can drop the one that you don't want when you have a more firmer career choice
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    You'll do fine if you get 10 A*, go on to the uni websites and see what their requirements are for the courses you want to take - research it.

    A mix seems pretty good. If you love physics and you seem really smart, maybe take an extra? Though they are really hard. I'd say drop critical thinking, most don't take it as a real a-level, so it's a bit pointless if you don't have too.

    But good on you for thinking now, the requirements are different at different unis, so you'll want to see the sort you want to apply for... I have to start applying for uni soon and I'm only the year above you!

    I take bio, chem, history and geography, I've been told many times units for medicine/law like you having an academic 3rd a-level that is different from the others - as it shows your well-balance, so going for history or something is good
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    The above combination [EDIT: from the third post] would be very solid if you wish to study medicine, but it will put you at quite a disadvantage should you end up wishing to apply for law - a disadvantage exacerbated by the competitiveness of the course.

    As such, there is little point in taking English lit over another science. If you prefer physics to English, and you're better at it (as your post suggests), go with that instead. Medicine is science, and whilst the Oxbridge med schools like their students to be well-rounded, they certainly do not value essay based subjects above science subjects.
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    People seem very misinformed here. For Law there are NO specific subject requirements. Doing all sciences will not put you at a disadvantage at all. If that is what you want to do, then do that. In fact, I remmeber reading something like that on the Cambridge website, as you say you are considering Oxbridge. (Anecdotal evidence: I know 2 people who got into Cambridge Law with 3 science/maths A Levels.)

    From Cambridge website: "In our experience, applicants with backgrounds in Mathematics and science subjects perform as well as those whose background is in humanities subjects."

    If your favourite subjects are the 3 sciences and maths, then do those. Alternatively, you could do 3 science/maths subjects, and one essay subject. After reading your initial post again, I say definitely go with 3 sciences and maths. They're your favourite subjects, and they're fine for studying medicine and law.
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    (Original post by impossibleisnothing)
    I have to give in my A level choices in a few weeks. After only recently getting my mock results back I'm starting to worry about my choice of subjects. My GCSE options were history, geography and electronics aswell as all the other usual ones (triple award science btw.) My mock results are all A*s with a couple of As in english lit and lang. I'ma iming to bump these up in the real exams and hopefully will get 10 A*s in total.

    Im not certain about a future career or what i want to study at university. I'm leaning towards either medicine or law. This leaves me with some difficult decisions over a levels as both professions require different types of skills and qualifications.

    Initially without thinking about careers and uni i would choose maths, physics, biology and chemistry. This combination would be suitable for medicine I think however I don't want to put all my eggs in one basket as I'm also interested in law.

    Do you think it would be worthwile to do an essay subject? If I did do science and maths would i find it hard getting on an undergraduate law degree course?

    Here are the subjects I'm picking from for my A levels:
    Maths, Physics, Biology, Chemistry, English, History, Critical thinking.(as an extra which i will do if i do well in As exam this summer)

    Idealy I would choose sciences and maths. But I'm fearful that this might rule me out of getting into do law at top uni's e.g oxbridge. I have read on uni sites that people who do maths and science subjects at a level do just as well as students who have done essay subjects at a level.

    I'm thinking I may have to hedge my bets and go for Chem, Bio, maths and eng lit or hist (plus critical thinking).Although this would be a shame as I love physics.

    Thanks in advance for your replies
    The International Baccalaurete Diploma is definately for you! Google it for more info
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    (Original post by DaveJ)
    People seem very misinformed here. For Law there are NO specific subject requirements. Doing all sciences will not put you at a disadvantage at all. If that is what you want to do, then do that. In fact, I remmeber reading something like that on the Cambridge website, as you say you are considering Oxbridge. (Anecdotal evidence: I know 2 people who got into Cambridge Law with 3 science/maths A Levels.)

    From Cambridge website: "In our experience, applicants with backgrounds in Mathematics and science subjects perform as well as those whose background is in humanities subjects."

    If your favourite subjects are the 3 sciences and maths, then do those. Alternatively, you could do 3 science/maths subjects, and one essay subject. After reading your initial post again, I say definitely go with 3 sciences and maths. They're your favourite subjects, and they're fine for studying medicine and law.
    This is exactly right.
    Anybody who says that doing straight sciences at A level will make it difficult to do Law is lying. For my own sanity, I would have to do at least one essay subject, because I think it's nice to swap between sciences and humanities, but it isn't necessary. Medicine is stricter as to subjects to take, so go with those necessary for medicine. Do things you'll be good at first and foremost - getting the grades will be the most important thing.
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    Just because you know of people who have gotten into Cambridge with three sciences, does not mean that such a combination does not disadvantage you. I know of people who have gotten into Oxbridge with only one or two A*s and a high number of Bs (at GCSE), but that does not mean that giving up on your GCSEs won't affect your chances.

    Law is unusual in that there are no A-Level requirements. Still, if you want to maximise your chances, you should definitely do a couple of arts subjects, e.g. history or politics. As I said, if you try to reach a balance between the two courses, you are increasing your risk of being rejected from both. EDIT: After having read the quote from the Cambridge website, I have to concede that studying straight sciences might not be as detrimental as I assumed. Nonetheless, you cannot disagree that in general, when it comes to the most competitive universities in the country, spreading yourself thin over a broad range of subjects is going to put you at a disadvantage when applying, since many other candidates will have more suitable A Level combinations.
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    (Original post by porkstein)
    Just because you know of people who have gotten into Cambridge with three sciences, does not mean that such a combination does not disadvantage you. I know of people who have gotten into Oxbridge with only one or two A*s and a high number of Bs (at GCSE), but that does not mean that giving up on your GCSEs won't affect your chances.
    Obviously, the higher the GCSEs the better. I see no statement on the Cambridge website saying "candidates with low GCSEs are just as good as candidates with higher GCSEs." However, they do specificially say that about subject choices for Law.
    Law is unusual in that there are no A-Level requirements. Still, if you want to maximise your chances, you should definitely do a couple of arts subjects, e.g. history or politics. As I said, if you try to reach a balance between the two courses, you are increasing your risk of being rejected from both.
    But that's completely incorrect. Cambridge specifically point out they don't care if you do all sciences. If they cared, they would say so. After all, they have no qualms about requesting 3 sciences/maths for medicine, despite being the only medical school to do so.

    I've read your edit, and still don't really know what you mean. I advised the OP to do the 3 sciences and maths, as they are their favourite subjects and are suitable for both medicine and law, but I also suggested they could do 3 sciences/maths and one humanity. Either of those 2 combinations I advised would be perfectly acceptable for both medicine and law.

    EDIT: Sorry for my reply being specific to Cambridge. It's just because that's where I got the quote from and the OP said they were considering there. As far as I am aware though, no university has specific subject requirements for Law.
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    Doing ICT at huddersfield? Any good
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    (Original post by porkstein)
    Just because you know of people who have gotten into Cambridge with three sciences, does not mean that such a combination does not disadvantage you.
    True. But hearing from admissions tutors at Cambridge, and reading it in their admissions policy on their website would surely be a strong indication.

    (Original post by porkstein)
    Law is unusual in that there are no A-Level requirements. Still, if you want to maximise your chances, you should definitely do a couple of arts subjects, e.g. history or politics. As I said, if you try to reach a balance between the two courses, you are increasing your risk of being rejected from both.
    But by trying to balance, the OP may be diminishing their chances for science based courses, which are renowned for needing specific A Levels. By taking straight sciences, they are as well equipped as possible for any science based course, and are not disadvantaged if they choose to take Law, which, as you say, as no A-Level requirements. I understand the assumption that English is so fundamental to the degree and therefore it would be a benefit at A Level, but this is simply not the case. I'm not saying there is anything wrong with taking a combination of the two, but the OP needs to be aware that they do not need to, especially if they are more likely to get higher grades in pure science subjects.
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    At the moment I think I will go for:

    Maths, Bio, Chem, Eng lit and critical thinking

    Bio and chem are good for medical courses, chem is a prerequisite for every medical course I've researched and most ask for another science/maths subject, biology is only a must for some uni's however obviously I would have to catch up a lot before starting a course without atleast As level bio. Maths is because it interests me and it is helpful with science a levels apparently. English because it is an essay subject which is well respected, my only concern is whether I can get an A/A* in it. I'm relatively good at it, but lately I've been having problems with it as I'm doing Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility which i find incredibly soporific and hard to follow. I will discuss it with my enlish teacher at a parents evening before I hand in my choices. The reason i prefer English is because -although i have a certain love of history especially the GCSE syllabus which covers modern history e.g WWII, etc- the a level topics don't interest me at all. Im only thinking of critical thinking because it may look good as an extra on top of my other a levels, I realise it won't be considered in an offer but it may help give me an edge. Not physics because although I enjoy it isn't a necessity for medicine and it is by know means necessary for law, therefore I realise I'll have to take this tough decision.

    I am also considering taking all my AS subjects to A level. I ofcourse won't know if this is realistic until I begin the AS courses and see how I do. However, what do you guys think of doing 4 A levels? In some particular colleges they recommend doing 4, e.g. Churchill college Cambridge.

    I'm going off on a tangent here slightly so I'll get back to the point! Would my above choices (with top grades) give me a chance either route I decide to go down?

    Porkstein mentioned that oxbridge like you to put all your eggs in one basket. This is something I'm weary of and from Oxbridge websites the requirements for law are non existent as long as they are academic which seems to counter that point.Science and maths do require logical thinking as does law.
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    (Original post by impossibleisnothing)
    At the moment I think I will go for:

    Maths, Bio, Chem, Eng lit and critical thinking

    Bio and chem are good for medical courses, chem is a prerequisite for every medical course I've researched and most ask for another science/maths subject, biology is only a must for some uni's however obviously I would have to catch up a lot before starting a course without atleast As level bio. Maths is because it interests me and it is helpful with science a levels apparently. English because it is an essay subject which is well respected, my only concern is whether I can get an A/A* in it. I'm relatively good at it, but lately I've been having problems with it as I'm doing Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility which i find incredibly soporific and hard to follow. I will discuss it with my enlish teacher at a parents evening before I hand in my choices. The reason i prefer English is because -although i have a certain love of history especially the GCSE syllabus which covers modern history e.g WWII, etc- the a level topics don't interest me at all. Im only thinking of critical thinking because it may look good as an extra on top of my other a levels, I realise it won't be considered in an offer but it may help give me an edge. Not physics because although I enjoy it isn't a necessity for medicine and it is by know means necessary for law, therefore I realise I'll have to take this tough decision.

    I am also considering taking all my AS subjects to A level. I ofcourse won't know if this is realistic until I begin the AS courses and see how I do. However, what do you guys think of doing 4 A levels? In some particular colleges they recommend doing 4, e.g. Churchill college Cambridge.

    I'm going off on a tangent here slightly so I'll get back to the point! Would my above choices (with top grades) give me a chance either route I decide to go down?

    Porkstein mentioned that oxbridge like you to put all your eggs in one basket. This is something I'm weary of and from Oxbridge websites the requirements for law are non existent as long as they are academic which seems to counter that point.Science and maths do require logical thinking as does law.
    If I were you, I'd do Physics instead of English Literature. Simply because you seem to really want to do it, and there are no subject requirements for Law, and also you are worrying about getting an A in English.
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    As I said, I appreciate that studying straight sciences at A Level does not really damage your chances of studying law at Oxbridge. I was wrong on that front. What I'm trying to say, however, is that "spreading yourself thin over a broad range of subjects is going to put you at a disadvantage when applying to a top university in general". Perhaps I should have emphasised those last two words.

    This does not specifically answer his question, but I feel it should be made known - who knows how his opinions will change over the next few weeks/months/years. Maybe tomorrow he decides he wouldn't mind studying French at university? (extreme example)

    EDIT: And yes, I also agree with the above post. Studying English instead of physics won't offer you any advantages over other candidates unless you decide to study a subject heavily based on it, e.g. English
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    I really don't think there will be much advantage in taking Critical Thinking. Firstly, the subject isn't really respected or accepted at all. Secondly, doing five subjects is largely irrelevant as universities will only ever really take a look at your three / four top grades. If you're going to take five subjects, which is a possible solution, then at least make the last one count...
    As for keeping all your subjects on 'til A Level, it's feasible. I'm doing six and I cope fine. But not everybody does, and there are plenty of other threads for you to trail through for discussions on whether it is worth all the work.
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    I don't think it would matter if you did all sciences at A-level and want to do law. As you are concerenced about getting a good grade in English lit then it would be berret to do physics and get a good grade in that. For law, it's more important to show your interest out of the clasroom; read interesting books, get work experience, go to the courts etc. There are no subject requirements for law so take what you want to study and can get good grades in.
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    Thanks for all the replies so far, I appreciate your inputs. I guess I'm probably decided over 3 of my choices:

    Maths, Bio & Chem

    The decision is essentially physics or eng lit. Although i may have hinted at being less adept at eng lit I'm confident of my abilities in that area, in my english mocks i left out a 6 mark question which brought my lang mark down by 6% which cost me an A* and the litereture was only an A because I hadn't finished re-writing some of the pieces. The only thing that is deterring me from taking physics is that it may hinder my chances of law at a top uni, however it seems I may have made an incorrect assumption over the need for an essay subject. On the other hand perhaps an essay subject may prepare me more for a law degree.

    If I don;t have to do English, i shall go with physics, I will try and contact some oxbridge admissions tutors and ask their opinions. I also have a meeting with my teachers and careers adviser before I hand my options form in.
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    (Original post by impossibleisnothing)
    Thanks for all the replies so far, I appreciate your inputs. I guess I'm probably decided over 3 of my choices:

    Maths, Bio & Chem

    The decision is essentially physics or eng lit. Although i may have hinted at being less adept at eng lit I'm confident of my abilities in that area, in my english mocks i left out a 6 mark question which brought my lang mark down by 6% which cost me an A* and the litereture was only an A because I hadn't finished re-writing some of the pieces. The only thing that is deterring me from taking physics is that it may hinder my chances of law at a top uni, however it seems I may have made an incorrect assumption over the need for an essay subject. On the other hand perhaps an essay subject may prepare me more for a law degree.

    If I don;t have to do English, i shall go with physics, I will try and contact some oxbridge admissions tutors and ask their opinions. I also have a meeting with my teachers and careers adviser before I hand my options form in.
    Well as I've said, I don't think universities care what subjects you do for Law, so long as they are respected subjects, so I'd just go with Physics. But yeah, email admissions tutors just to be safe.
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    do the sciences! everywhere will take you for law anyway
 
 
 
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