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    Hi everyone,
    I'm a 3rd Year Business Management student and doing a Business Ethics assignment on "How fair is Fairtrade?". I just wanted your views and arguments on Fairtrade.

    Heres some food for thought,

    * Is it just a marketing ploy? Or do companies have a genuin care for the community?

    * Do supermarkets overcharge Fairtrade products? And where does the extra money go?


    All thoughts would be hugely appreciated. Thank you.
    Claire
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    There is only one kind of fair trade and that is one without government intervention, tariffs or quotas.
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    :ditto:

    I'm opposed to it and the name 'Fairtrade', as it implies that free trade is unfair, when, of course, it is not.
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    (Original post by JakePearson)
    :ditto:

    I'm opposed to it and the name 'Fairtrade', as it implies that free trade is unfair, when, of course, it is not.
    Typical capitalist supporting exploitation. You speak as if fairtrade is somehow incompatible with free-trade. Free-trade is simply trade without government interference so I'd like to see how you argue this as incompatible with fair-trade. Fair-trade is not government regulation in the market. It is people and organisations getting together to pay farmers and workers what they deserve and is a voluntary system. If people want to get together to pay people what they deserve (and not merely what they can be paid then who are you to stop them?especially given your avatar). Stop doing a disservice to libertarians alike and accept that fair trade is compatible with free-trade,free-trade is not just you going to Primark and paying jack-**** for a t-shirt.
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    (Original post by tomheppy)
    Typical capitalist supporting exploitation.
    I am not supporting exploitation. Most capitalists do not.

    (Original post by tomheppy)
    You speak as if fairtrade is somehow incompatible with free-trade. Free-trade is simply trade without government interference so I'd like to see how you argue this as incompatible with fair-trade. Fair-trade is not government regulation in the market. It is people and organisations getting together to pay farmers and workers what they deserve and is a voluntary system. If people want to get together to pay people what they deserve (and not merely what they can be paid then who are you to stop them?especially given your avatar). Stop doing a disservice to libertarians alike and accept that fair trade is compatible with free-trade,free-trade is not just you going to Primark and paying jack-**** for a t-shirt.
    I said no such thing. All I said here was that the name "FairTrade" implies that free trade is unfair. Free trade has allowed the FairTrade movement to prosper. I am not discrediting anyone, and I am not saying anything is incompatible with anything. I am merely pointing out the flaw in the name. Don't make out I'm doing things that I am not.

    If someone wants to voluntarily set up a FairTrade market, and people want to voluntarily buy from it, then fine by me! As long as I am not coerced into it.
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    (Original post by JakePearson)
    :ditto:

    I'm opposed to it and the name 'Fairtrade', as it implies that free trade is unfair, when, of course, it is not.
    Fair trade is surely part of "free trade"?
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    (Original post by Moe Lester)
    Fair trade is surely part of "free trade"?
    It is indeed. But those in the FairTrade movement tend to discredit free trade as ruthless capitalism crushing the dreams of the poor by exploiting them, making only the rich richer. The reality is that free trade is what has advanced their cause.
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    (Original post by JakePearson)
    It is indeed. But those in the FairTrade movement tend to discredit free trade as ruthless capitalism crushing the dreams of the poor by exploiting them, making only the rich richer. The reality is that free trade is what has advanced their cause.
    Do they? Such as whom?
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    Look at a company like nestle. Their chocolate has been deemed as fair trade now, however the company's ethics are appauling
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    The point about fair trade and free trade is that the government can, if they want, give a country totally fair and free trade. In a world with no tariffs and quotas all trade will be free and fair.

    You can, if you want, pay someone more than the market value for what they produce, because you fell sorry for them, but that doesn't mean the transaction is somehow fairer than if you had paid the market value. While fairtrade does make some poor people richer, it is really just charity. If you want fairness, then free trade is the only way to go.

    I'm not saying fairtrade is a bad thing, if you want to buy it then good for you, you're helping out someone who needs help. But don't be fooled into thinking that free trade is somehow unfair because a thing called fair trade exists as well.
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    Free Trade, by it's nature, is exploitative. Fairtrade is just a load of liberal guilt crap for helping guardian readers feel good about themselves.
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    (Original post by Cesare Borgia)
    Free Trade, by it's nature, is exploitative. Fairtrade is just a load of liberal guilt crap for helping guardian readers feel good about themselves.
    That is quite an assertion you have made there. Care to back it up? If I go to the guy living next door and I give him some eggs, and he gives me some milk, and we both agree with the trade and think it is a good deal, then who exactly is being exploited?
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    It's a rip off, when i was in America it cost me $3 for 1 damn apple, not even a bunch of them.
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    (Original post by Moe Lester)
    Do they? Such as whom?
    These people...

    Also Guardianistas and most students.
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    (Original post by The_Octopus)
    That is quite an assertion you have made there. Care to back it up? If I go to the guy living next door and I give him some eggs, and he gives me some milk, and we both agree with the trade and think it is a good deal, then who exactly is being exploited?
    Do you not seek to maximise the amount of eggs you get, whilst minimising the amount of milk you give them?
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    (Original post by Cesare Borgia)
    Do you not seek to maximise the amount of eggs you get, whilst minimising the amount of milk you give them?
    Yes, of course I do, and so do they. But if we reach an agreement we are both happy with, then neither has exploited the other. Nobody is being forced into doing something they do not want to do, and everybody is better off than when they started. If I think my eggs are worth more than the milk I am offered, I can try trading with somebody else instead.
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    There are several issues with fair trade, for example, you have to have a registered business to get fair trade approved and many poor countries are rife with cronyism so it's difficult to obtain a business licence, which means farmer A can be getting fairtrade prices, but farmer B next door isn't granted a licence so he doesn't get paid the same price at all. That's one of the most unfair things about fairtrade, the fact that different people are getting different prices for the same products.
    In addition, Fairtrade requires business to be run as collectives (ie every farmer has a stake) but the poorest farmers don't have enough capital to buy into such a business so they aren't helped by it at all.

    Also, paying people more than the natural market equilibrium can cause over production and can (possibly) create unemployment.
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    (Original post by The_Octopus)
    Yes, of course I do, and so do they. But if we reach an agreement we are both happy with, then neither has exploited the other. Nobody is being forced into doing something they do not want to do, and everybody is better off than when they started. If I think my eggs are worth more than the milk I am offered, I can try trading with somebody else instead.
    In human nature, the happiness of your neighbour vs. personal gain, which do you think will triumph?

    Free Trade will be fair when it is conducted by emotionless robots.
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    (Original post by Business_Student)
    Hi everyone,
    I'm a 3rd Year Business Management student and doing a Business Ethics assignment on "How fair is Fairtrade?". I just wanted your views and arguments on Fairtrade.

    Heres some food for thought,

    * Is it just a marketing ploy? Or do companies have a genuin care for the community?

    * Do supermarkets overcharge Fairtrade products? And where does the extra money go?


    All thoughts would be hugely appreciated. Thank you.
    Claire
    The supermarkets are awful at exploiting the whole fair trade issue. I have an article somewhere I can find for you if you're interested. I'd also recommend if you can, watch "Black Gold"

    http://www.blackgoldmovie.com/ which covers fair trade and the coffee industry. It was available in my Uni library so have a look on your uni catalogue!
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    (Original post by The_Octopus)
    Yes, of course I do, and so do they. But if we reach an agreement we are both happy with, then neither has exploited the other. Nobody is being forced into doing something they do not want to do, and everybody is better off than when they started. If I think my eggs are worth more than the milk I am offered, I can try trading with somebody else instead.
    Because we all have that option - not. You are assuming equality of bargaining power, which isn't realistic.
 
 
 
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