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    (Original post by there's too much love)
    How do you feel about Suma and Dove Farm?
    Or one world is enough?
    What?

    Dunno about Doves Farm but I know about Suma. What do you mean how do I feel about it?
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    (Original post by SunOfABeach)
    What?

    Dunno about Doves Farm but I know about Suma. What do you mean how do I feel about it?
    How you feel about their fair trade products?
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    Buying local is "fairer" than fair trade, as warm a feeling as it might give liberals to know they're giving a couple of pennies to a black woman with an orange headwrap on, it's shallow and fruitless.
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    Fairtrade is obviously a good initiative but its wayyy less than what should be done to help less developed economies, and anyone with any economics knowledge will know this.
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    (Original post by The_Octopus)
    There is only one kind of fair trade and that is one without government intervention, tariffs or quotas.
    :yep:
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    (Original post by folde)
    Buying local is "fairer" than fair trade, as warm a feeling as it might give liberals to know they're giving a couple of pennies to a black woman with an orange headwrap on, it's shallow and fruitless.

    Is your thinking:
    "Some fair trade isn't particularly fair thus all fair trade isn't particularly fair"?
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    I suppose in theory it is good like most things.
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    (Original post by tomheppy)
    Typical capitalist supporting exploitation. You speak as if fairtrade is somehow incompatible with free-trade. Free-trade is simply trade without government interference so I'd like to see how you argue this as incompatible with fair-trade. Fair-trade is not government regulation in the market. It is people and organisations getting together to pay farmers and workers what they deserve and is a voluntary system. If people want to get together to pay people what they deserve (and not merely what they can be paid then who are you to stop them?especially given your avatar). Stop doing a disservice to libertarians alike and accept that fair trade is compatible with free-trade,free-trade is not just you going to Primark and paying jack-**** for a t-shirt.
    Absolutely right my friend, and well said.
    I've been saying for a long time that fairtrade as an ideology of anti-exploitation will not make too much of a widescale difference for third-world societies until the sale of products is incorporated by the largest brands. But when it is done so, and it has been making incredible progress over the last 10 years, the result will be the driving down the cost of the products as well when the demand is increased for them. Whilst it will also ideally lead to more fairtrade cooperatives being opened in third-world countries as at the moment the amount of people involved is incredibly small, the lucky people. Furthermore the idea will spread and the quality of the products will improve as the competition increases, although there is some phenomenally good products out there already, Traidcraft in particular are a great FT brand.
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    (Original post by JakePearson)

    I said no such thing. All I said here was that the name "FairTrade" implies that free trade is unfair. Free trade has allowed the FairTrade movement to prosper. I am not discrediting anyone, and I am not saying anything is incompatible with anything. I am merely pointing out the flaw in the name. Don't make out I'm doing things that I am not.

    If someone wants to voluntarily set up a FairTrade market, and people want to voluntarily buy from it, then fine by me! As long as I am not coerced into it.
    You know why fair-trade seems to imply free-trade is unfair? Because it is unfair. It is grossly unfair. Don't get me wrong I'm not about to ban free consenting trade amongst individuals because I don't think force should be used to ensure fairness. But I think it indisputable that free-trade is unfair. People ought not to be paid what the market says that they can be paid but rather, at the very least, what they need in order to live a fulfilling life. If you want to go and buy dirt cheap coffee then I'm not about to stop you but nevertheless I think that you should buy fairtrade (unless you want to hit back at me with the idea that paying what the market dictates is actually better for the farmers than fair-trade,an idea which is in most cases obviously false).
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    Advocates of free trade and fair trade both have shared wishes for poverty alleviation and increased global prosperity, it can be argued that fair trade rather than free trade is more detrimental to the workers in developing countries.

    The fair trade industry is booming, in the UK, the retail value of Fairtrade Certified products grew 72% from the year 2006 to 2007, where it reached a figure of around €704.3 million . Fair trade supporters maintain that providing a fair price with improved social and environmental standards, would lead to empowerment for producers whilst promoting sustainability and economic development.

    However increasing fair trade can bring around several problems. For instance it can lead to a price distortion in markets. This is because Fairtrade producers are guaranteed a minimum selling price, this would give an increased incentive for producers to produce more, and on top of that it may lead to more competitors switching to Fairtrade. Overall this would lead to an increased supply in that specific market, thus leading to lower prices, which means that the majority non-Fairtrade farmers would be severely affected.

    Also with fair trade, it can be seen as an inefficient method of getting money to the poorer producers. This is because many retailers add a substantial mark-up to their prices, mainly due to consumer guilt, marketing reasons and ignorance on what percentage of the sold product goes back to the farmer. Incidentally it has been estimated that only 10% of the price of Fairtrade coffee makes its way back to the coffee growers.

    Whilst there is no denying that morally Fairtrade has good intentions, free trade provides a better option, as it allows LDC’s to specialise and gain from comparative advantage while trading, as well as encouraging countries to industrialise and develop more efficient farming practices.
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    Thank you all for your input so far. Can anyone think of any specific companies that have been unethical in the past and then have gone on to release a Fairtrade product. I know Nestle are one prime example.
 
 
 
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