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Is it possible to imagine a new colour? watch

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    I don't think its possible to do it in the brain. I'm no colour specialist however, is it possible it could be a new shade that hasn't been given a name?
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    (Original post by GottaLovePhysics! :))
    Impossible. Scince colour is only a wave freqency, what frequency would this new colour be? A mutation can interprate the wave to another couler or even another sense (eg, sound) However where would this new colour come from?
    The part of the EM spectrum that we can see with our eyes is only a tiny, tiny part of it. We can't see gamma rays, X-rays, UV, IR, microwaves, radio waves, etc. We can only see a tiny little bit in the middle. Hypothetically if someone had a fourth colour receptor, it might respond to a frequency slightly into the UV or IR part of the spectrum that normal people can't see. As they have a different receptor that is distinct from the red, green and blue ones we have, they would see it as a new colour.
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    (Original post by + polarity -)
    "Achievement unlocked: Chartreuse."
    i love that elephant!
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    does the color of barney the purple dinosaur count as one of these strange colors?
    LOL
    Briefly, in the retinas of our eyes are molecules that will warp when they absorb a photon. Different ones will warp from different energy bands of photons. These bands are rather broad and overlap; we can see four or five of them (men mostly four, some women can get five.

    The warping molecules send a nerve signal to the brain. The visual cortex then does a subtraction, so it is the difference of the intensities of the bands which is sent on for higher processing. Eventually - it hasn't been completely unravelled - this issues in our perception of the colored scene we are looking at. Different peoples have different ways of splitting up the colors, although tests have shown we all (color-blind people apart) see the dame frequency/energy bands.
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    Isn't a Terry Prachett novel written around a 'new colour' Octive/tine (?) something spelt like that.
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    (Original post by Curly_hair_girl)
    Isn't a Terry Prachett novel written around a 'new colour' Octive/tine (?) something spelt like that.
    octarine. shame it isnt real
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    (Original post by GottaLovePhysics! :))
    NO. NO. NO.
    Tell him he is an idiot and you are correct, there is no wave that will create any colour that isnt in between violite and red.

    what about pink?

    ITS EXTRA-SPECTRAL

    it doesn't lie between violite and red :yep: :woo:
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    (Original post by Rananagirl)
    It's most likely impossible to be able to imagine this, since we've lived our entire lives in this set colour-scheme.
    Certain animals, such as the Mantis Shrimp and Zebra Fish, are able to see more distinct wavelengths than humans, because they have more different types of photoreceptors. This means they can see different colours where it would look the same to humans (such as on types of coral), including four primary colours.
    I'd think since everything we imagine or visualise is at least loosely based on our reality it would be impossible to picture something different, but any neuroscientists who may or may not be around, feel free to correct me.

    Unless your friend has tetrachromacy, which is only possible in women and has only been identified in one or two people world-wide, but even then the colour wouldn't be 'new' for him since he'd have lived with it until now.
    Darn those greedy Zebra Fish!
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    (Original post by AsystoleUK)
    Darn those greedy Zebra Fish!
    is the picture in your sig real?
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    no you cant, we already have the capabilitied to produce more colours than the human spectrum can define between
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    (Original post by usernamegoeshere)
    is the picture in your sig real?
    I wrote the latter paragraph. *ashamed*
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    (Original post by DJkG.1)
    We discussed this in RS: philosophy & ethics the other day.

    What a waste of 10 minutes that was. :indiff:

    And you are right in that colours are only energies associated with a flow of photons, or wavelengths and frequencies associated with an electromagnetic wave. So they can only be 'discovered' not created.

    However, if he is thinking of a colour which doesn't have a colloquial name, then I suppose he is right from an anthropic way of thinking.

    You're both right!
    A prism splits light up into pure wavelengths; some colours such as brown, for example, do not occur in a rainbow, as it is an amalgamation of a few pure wavelengths. So if we saw red, orange and green lights together, our brains would percieve it as an entirely new colour, brown. So perhaps we are able to perceive even more colours which we are yet to stumble upon.
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    The idea of whether colours exist independently of objects or whether they are generalisations drawn over several objects by the mind is a very old philosophical question, the answer to that one would inform the answer to the main question in this thread.

    (Original post by GottaLovePhysics! :))
    Impossible. Scince colour is only a wave freqency, what frequency would this new colour be? A mutation can interprate the wave to another couler or even another sense (eg, sound) However where would this new colour come from?
    Not true, human perception of colour is about relative colours in the environment. Absolute wavelengths are the input but they are not simply mapped onto colours in our perceptions

    Check out some of Edwin Land's experiments:
    http://people.msoe.edu/~taylor/eisl/land.htm
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    (Original post by Psyk)
    The part of the EM spectrum that we can see with our eyes is only a tiny, tiny part of it. We can't see gamma rays, X-rays, UV, IR, microwaves, radio waves, etc. We can only see a tiny little bit in the middle. Hypothetically if someone had a fourth colour receptor, it might respond to a frequency slightly into the UV or IR part of the spectrum that normal people can't see. As they have a different receptor that is distinct from the red, green and blue ones we have, they would see it as a new colour.
    Ahh, but even if a mutation could ditect another em wave it wouldnt produce a new colour. When a wave is a frequency either side of visible light it dosnt produce a colour, even if you can detect it with your eyes. IR or UV may produce a diffent shade of the existing red and purple.
    However after these two groups around Visible light, the other EM waves will be impossible to detect (microwaves for obviouse reasons and X - rays.)

    Althouth if you want to, you can take a look at some gamma rays and see what colour you see :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by gozatron)
    Is it possible to imagine a new colour?
    Haha, I was thinking about this today, coincidentally. But I don't think so... your mate was either pulling your leg, or he isn't aware that the spetrum of all possible shades has been extensively created.
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    (Original post by RadioElectric)
    The idea of whether colours exist independently of objects or whether they are generalisations drawn over several objects by the mind is a very old philosophical question, the answer to that one would inform the answer to the main question in this thread.



    Not true, human perception of colour is about relative colours in the environment. Absolute wavelengths are the input but they are not simply mapped onto colours in our perceptions

    Check out some of Edwin Land's experiments:
    http://people.msoe.edu/~taylor/eisl/land.htm
    Yes the perception of colour isnt an "inset" into the mind but as I was saying to another post, no other EM wave can give us a colour with the vage posability of UV and IR, which are already colours (although they cold give us new shades, possable a new plane we see them in.
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    (Original post by EffieFlowers)
    Maybe. That would be AMAZING! But highly highly highly unlikely.. Maybe this friend of yours has a special sort of brain. Maybe he can see things we can't.. :ninja:
    He's a wizard and can see in octarine, the pigment of the imagination.
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    woah, ive wondered this my whole life! i wonder if theres a facebook page for people like me who do this...
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    (Original post by edmhaslam)
    i like the idea that my green, is not necessarily your green. wouldnt it be incredible if people saw colours differently?!? noone would ever know as we've just been told that that colour is called X and so on!
    yay another person who shares my theory, i always try and explain it to people but they never get it :P
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    Physically impossible. Why? - Perception. We hold images of different idealised monochromatic light in our minds and everything else inbetween is just shades of these colours.

    In a sense it is subjectively possible; Is there just blue, green and shades of them or is turquoise a colour in itself? An individual may be able to distinguish between and have names for more colours than you, but does that mean he has imagined a new colour? No, he has noticed something that was already there - something that you will generalise to as a shade between 'this' and 'that'. One could go to generalise it further and say that it is all white light anyway, proving your line of thought arbitrary.

    More interesting is that the thread title suggests that colour is a product of consciousness. This works. After all, what meaning would the word yellow have if humans did not have the sense of sight? A tree trunk in a human-less world would still be brown as it absorbs all light except wavelengths we would loosely label 'brown', but these labels would not exist without us, so discrete colours would no longer exist. All light is a spectrum.
 
 
 
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