Turn on thread page Beta
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Is this a better way to learn than tediously studying the grammar? Can you just "pick it up"? experiences anyone?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    Well it's a good way of learning vocab and understanding the grammar better. It's good if you get a parallel text, then you don't have to bother with the dictionary all the time.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CharlieDon'tSurf)
    Is this a better way to learn than tediously studying the grammar? Can you just "pick it up"? experiences anyone?
    I wouldn't say it's the best way of studying grammar - unless you're actually looking out for the different grammatical structures in the text - however, it does give you a better 'feel' for the language. I can't really explain it :angelblush:

    It's a good way of studying vocabulary though. Unfortunately, I get really frustrated and am constantly picking up a dictionary whilst reading foreign texts :rolleyes:
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by CharlieDon'tSurf)
    Is this a better way to learn than tediously studying the grammar?
    YES.
    When you read because the book is of your appeal, you read more eagerly and therefore it doesn't feel as though you were studying.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I read a few, but only really to pick up new vocabulary (and even then I need a dictionary quite a bit). I just practise grammar instead.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    I read a few because I like them, don't bother if you don't enjoy reading them though because in reality you can't really just pick it up from books. It does make things easier, learning new vocab, understanding generally how sentences are structured, and when you learn new grammar it's sometimes easier to understand if you've read some examples. With grammar the best thing to do is just memorise the patterns and practise. The other thing about reading is you will get better at being able to understand what a sentence means without knowing every word, by using context etc which comes in useful for exams
    So basically in my opinion it's not essential and there are more efficient ways of learning the language but it's a useful thing to do if you have the time, plus I think it will look good if applying for a language degree that you've already started reading foreign books.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Okay, so basically I'm going to read Harry Potter & The Philosopher's Stone but in French. From past experience of people who've done the same, is it best for me to read the words in my head as they are or do a kind of "live translation" in my head when I'm reading it. Also, should I try and abstain from the dictionary completely or do you think I should have a go at the words and then just look up the ones I'm completely :confused: about?

    Thanksss
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RyuHADOUKEN)
    Okay, so basically I'm going to read Harry Potter & The Philosopher's Stone but in French. From past experience of people who've done the same, is it best for me to read the words in my head as they are or do a kind of "live translation" in my head when I'm reading it. Also, should I try and abstain from the dictionary completely or do you think I should have a go at the words and then just look up the ones I'm completely :confused: about?

    Thanksss
    Best thing to do is just start reading and see what works for you. Some people look up every single word they don't know and write them down, others find looking everything up too much of a hassle and just try and get by as best they can. If you're just reading it for pleasure then I wouldn't bother trying to translate any of it unless if you want to check you've understood the meaning.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Read with the dictionary next to you. Write down every word you don't know and its translation. After my first german kids book I had about 20 pages of translations... 10years later I can still see that list of words in my head today.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
Updated: February 10, 2010
The home of Results and Clearing

1,738

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year

University open days

  1. SAE Institute
    Animation, Audio, Film, Games, Music, Business, Web Further education
    Thu, 16 Aug '18
  2. Bournemouth University
    Clearing Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
  3. University of Bolton
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 17 Aug '18
Poll
Do you want your parents to be with you when you collect your A-level results?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.