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need tips for very cheap food budget watch

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    im hoping to spend £10 a week on food, maybe £15 at a push. any tips?
    best foods to buy? i have the basics like pasta
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    you can pretty much buy what you want with that... i do well off it!

    1) Limit the amount of meat you use
    2) Don't be afraid of buying value ingredients (i stress ingredients here because what can asda mess up when they just have to cook and chop some tomatoes compared to making spag bol in a tin).
    3) Learn to cook, don't bother with a cook book though - there are loads of websites out there you can try!
    4) Learn to replace expensive meats/fish with cheaper ones. Eg: replace chicken with turkey (also, minced beef can be replaced with turkey mince) and eat rainbow trout instead of salmon.
    5) Go shopping at the end of the day and get reduced stuff. (The freezer is your friend).
    6) Bulk out meals with vegetables
    7) Eat less
    8) Literally work out the cheapest way to buy your food. I buy 2 1KG bags of rice because they're cheaper than buying a 2KG bag of rice. I walk around the shop with my phone calculator out checking prices!
    9) The traditional shopping creeds of a) only buy what's on your list and b) don't go shopping when you're hungry. Also, make sure you make a shopping list that either contains whatever you've run out of or what you want for your meals next week. I tend to have ingredients that i can make things into in stock and replace them when they've run out but i know people like to buy just what they're going to need next week. See which works better for you!
    10) buy things when they're on offer and stockpile them until you want to use them (i've got 4 jars of sauce for chicken and 3 lumps of cheese at the moment from the latest offers).
    11) Don't think 'i can't buy this this week because it'll push me over my limit' in regards to reduced/offer foods. You're making a saving in the long run as long as you use the food before it goes out.
    12) The freezer is your friend!
    13) Never ever buy brand products unless they're on offer and are cheaper than the bargain one.
    14) Wine is the cheapest way to get drunk i've found. 1 bottle of wine's got about 10 units in and can be as cheap as a couple of pounds!
    15) If in doubt lee and perrins worcestershire sauce solves everything (ok, so this is something you should buy brand because it's amazing and it's made from where i come from! )

    Yeah, i'm sure there's loads more, this topic is really done to death every year!
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    9p Tesco Value shortbread! They have saved me so money I would spend on more expensive snacks. £10 is a reasonable amount - it shouldn't be too hard to work out on your own. Go on Tesco online/any other supermarket so you can see what you're going to spend before you go shopping.
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    (Original post by runner7791)
    im hoping to spend £10 a week on food, maybe £15 at a push. any tips?
    best foods to buy? i have the basics like pasta
    get yourself a slow cooker and cook cheap meat/veg in there..
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    Beans on toast! Ultimate student food! Or anything on toast really...
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    Keep your toast bread in the freezer so it doesn't go mouldy.
    Pasta and rice meals can be cheap and both can keep for some time compared to other staple carbohydrate foods.
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    Make your own cider:
    Pick some apples from a field, crush them up and mix the juice with 29p fizzy water from Tesco. Nick a bit of antifreeze from a car or if you have a mate in a chemistry department just ask them to get you some ethanol.
    Mix it all together and get drunk on the cheap!
    Lemme know how it all works out.
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    What the second poster said + Group shop! As long as they're not greedy and inconsiderate
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    It's all about making big pots of meals and splitting it up into little boxes, and freezing most of them (then leave out of the freezer to defrost or use defrost function on microwave and you have yourself a healthy ready-meal!)

    I agree about the vegetables...chopped peppers, carrots, lentils, tinned tomatoes, puree...it's all pretty cheap. Making your own soup is really cheap too.
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    Get used to bland food, because you won't be able to afford many herbs, spices or condiments on £10 a week.

    Get as much in bulk as you can. Pasta & rice especially. The till worker always makes comments when I buy 3kg bags of pasta, but pasta doesn't exactly go off so what's the point of buying small bags?

    For breakfast, buy cheap bran flakes and then if you have a favourite cereal which is a bit more expensive buy that too. Bulk out the bowl with bran flakes and then add a bit of the nice cereal. Works well with granola. My flatmate used to buy cheap muesli and expensive muesli and mix them together, but I wasn't a big fan of that. The cheap muesli just lowered the standards of the expensive stuff.
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    (Original post by matrix15)
    Make your own cider:
    Pick some apples from a field, crush them up and mix the juice with 29p fizzy water from Tesco. Nick a bit of antifreeze from a car or if you have a mate in a chemistry department just ask them to get you some ethanol.
    Mix it all together and get drunk on the cheap!
    Lemme know how it all works out.
    If you fancy poisoning yourself, then this seems like a good idea!
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    Noodles and pasta all the time
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    ~ Make a list of what you want before hand.
    ~ There is a price checker on Tesco website - http://www.tesco.com/todayattesco/pricecheck.shtml
    All you do is find the 'Price Check' box about half way down, and search for the item in there (Milk is in there already). It compares the prices to ASDA.
    ~ Add up what you have spent as you're going around the shop
    ~ Shop once a week/fornight at a supermarket, rather than buying milk at the corner shop, etc.
    ~ Freeze things like sausages, fish and ready meals, rather than putting them in the fridge and forgetting about them.
    ~ Buy big bags of frozen veg, rather than rfesh veg. It's just as good (if not better) for you, and you can use a little whenever you want.
    ~ Buy meat from the reduced section, to make stew, etc with the next day (or that night)
    ~ Buy the supermarkets own brand, rather than brand names
    ~ Don't be tempted to nip to the shops for chocolate, a sandwich, etc. Use what you have in.
    ~ Only eat 3 meals a day, and upto three snacks.
    ~ Don't buy sauces if you don't have them that often.
    ~ Avoid eating out if you know there's something in your fridge.
    ~ Avoid buying ready meals - it's usually cheaper (and more healthy) to make a meal from scratch.
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    If you like oriental stuff... its all about the noodles and the rice. £10 a week is crazy, £15 is reasonable, £20 is the limit, £25 i go on a diet for the following week
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    As above but also organize your food so that you never plan to cook something but then forget about it in the fridge.
    Bulk out the meat in your meals with beans, lentils, chick peas etc. Tinned kidney beans are a cheap source of protein.
    Always buy one or one of your favourite seasonings even if they're a little pricey. i.e garlic, lemons, olives and chilli mask bland cheap food very well which is good for your morale.
    Consider getting some seeds and growing some herbs in little pots on your windowsill. Lettuce leaves can also be grown like this.
    Embrace those cheap noodles for 10p but make proper meals out of them like miso or chicken soup or stir fry.
    Find out how to make more things from scratch like mayonaisse and sauces.
    Have some snack foods at home so you won't splurge while you're out. (cheap nuts and crisps are good for this).
    Use dried potato flakes to make fishcakes, potato cakes etc Potato cakes are good to replace toast if you have no bread as is fried dough (flour, water and salt, shallow fried).
    Buy loads of sardines and tuna in cans. Fresh fish will probably be too expensive but it's really good for you and is often cheaper than meat.
    Look into rice substitutes. I've found bulgher wheat and couscous to be cheaper and healthier than white rice.
    Change the way you cook. Don't stare at your fridge for inspiration when you're hungry but plan the night before. This way you can use dry chick peas etc without having to fork out extra for the tinned ones.
    Make double of every meal and freeze another portion so you don't have to cook everyday.
    Soup is usually cheap and easily frozen.
    It might seems hard at first but I spend only £20 on food for my family (four people) and it is do-able. if you're organized you can not only spend less money but you can save time as well.
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    Tesco value noodles... 8p a pack
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    (Original post by oodalallyoodalally)
    As above but also organize your food so that you never plan to cook something but then forget about it in the fridge.
    Bulk out the meat in your meals with beans, lentils, chick peas etc. Tinned kidney beans are a cheap source of protein.
    Always buy one or one of your favourite seasonings even if they're a little pricey. i.e garlic, lemons, olives and chilli mask bland cheap food very well which is good for your morale.
    Consider getting some seeds and growing some herbs in little pots on your windowsill. Lettuce leaves can also be grown like this.
    Embrace those cheap noodles for 10p but make proper meals out of them like miso or chicken soup or stir fry.
    Find out how to make more things from scratch like mayonaisse and sauces.
    Have some snack foods at home so you won't splurge while you're out. (cheap nuts and crisps are good for this).
    Use dried potato flakes to make fishcakes, potato cakes etc Potato cakes are good to replace toast if you have no bread as is fried dough (flour, water and salt, shallow fried).
    Buy loads of sardines and tuna in cans. Fresh fish will probably be too expensive but it's really good for you and is often cheaper than meat.
    Look into rice substitutes. I've found bulgher wheat and couscous to be cheaper and healthier than white rice.
    Change the way you cook. Don't stare at your fridge for inspiration when you're hungry but plan the night before. This way you can use dry chick peas etc without having to fork out extra for the tinned ones.
    Make double of every meal and freeze another portion so you don't have to cook everyday.
    Soup is usually cheap and easily frozen.
    It might seems hard at first but I spend only £20 on food for my family (four people) and it is do-able. if you're organized you can not only spend less money but you can save time as well.
    Have you seen the price of tinned tuna recently? It's incredibly high which is a pity as tuna is one of only 3 fishes i like eating! Anyhoo... i agree with all others you've said.
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    Make loads, freeze the excess. It's my food mantra.
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    Value porridge oats,
    Value beans,
    Value noodles (these ~9p ones)

    Sorted!
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    Tinned chickpeas are a good alternative to meat in curries. If you are making bolognese or something turkey mince is a lot cheaper aswell.
 
 
 
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