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    (Original post by robbo3045)
    HAHA IRONY. Your more militant than any atheist I have ever met.
    I think the word you were looking for was 'hypocritical' not 'irony'; not that it applies to me anyway.
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    (Original post by morecambebay)
    how exactly do atheists limit those who wish to practice their faith in privacy?
    I said that they have effectively limited peoples' practice of their religion to their own private remit, I didn't say they limited what they did in private. There's a distinct difference.

    (Original post by mrluvaluva)
    why does something that is completely irrational (belief in a deity in absence of any evidence) deserve any respect?
    Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.
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    (Original post by TheMeister)
    I said that they have effectively limited peoples' practice of their religion to their own private remit, I didn't say they limited what they did in private. There's a distinct difference.

    .
    no, you didnt actually. if that is what you meant then you wrote 'in' instead of 'to' and ****** it up.
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    (Original post by morecambebay)
    no, you didnt actually. if that is what you meant then you wrote 'in' instead of 'to' and ****** it up.
    Well, yes, that is what I meant.
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    Why do so many athiests have such a scant regard for peoples' beliefs? The Pope is the head of state of one of the world's nations; therefore he should be visiting.
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    (Original post by adamrules247)
    Why do so many athiests have such a scant regard for peoples' beliefs? The Pope is the head of state of one of the world's nations; therefore he should be visiting.
    The Pope is not visiting in his capacity as head of state of the [diplomatically irrelevant] Vatican state, he is visiting as a religious leader on the invitation of the government.
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    (Original post by TheMeister)
    Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.
    Is that a reasonable basis to believe in something?

    Normally, we believe something when there is sufficient empirical evidence to verify 'it' or you have a reasonable reason to believe it.

    There is, however, a lot of evidence to the statement that God does not exist. Not enough to verify it, of course, and although you'd have to define God first, most Gods have a lot of evidence against them.

    So that is why that statement does annoy me a little, because it has no relevance in the real world (unless, of course, we are speaking of quantum physics) and nobody lives & makes decisions on that basis.
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    i hope another woman body checks him, that was so good.

    BOOM TIME!

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    (Original post by Lord Hysteria)
    Is that a reasonable basis to believe in something?

    Normally, we believe something when there is sufficient empirical evidence to verify 'it' or you have a reasonable reason to believe it.

    There is, however, a lot of evidence to the statement that God does not exist. Not enough to verify it, of course, and although you'd have to define God first, most Gods have a lot of evidence against them.

    So that is why that statement does annoy me a little, because it has no relevance in the real world (unless, of course, we are speaking of quantum physics) and nobody lives & makes decisions on that basis.
    Richard Dawkings on TSR.

    It's more likely than you think.
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    (Original post by Lord Hysteria)
    Is that a reasonable basis to believe in something?

    Normally, we believe something when there is sufficient empirical evidence to verify 'it' or you have a reasonable reason to believe it.

    There is, however, a lot of evidence to the statement that God does not exist. Not enough to verify it, of course, and although you'd have to define God first, most Gods have a lot of evidence against them.

    So that is why that statement does annoy me a little, because it has no relevance in the real world (unless, of course, we are speaking of quantum physics) and nobody lives & makes decisions on that basis.
    You're right, I don't think it is a reason to believe in something - just because we can't see much beyond our solar system at the moment, doesn't mean that nothing exists - however, I do think it is fundamental in rebuking criticism that God doesn't or never has existed. Faith comes down to belief. Personally-speaking, mine has been revealed through some extreme co-incidences (I won't give any for this is merely an overview) - which could indeed be explained rationally, but I prefer for it not to be done so.

    No-one should be forced to believe in a God if they find that they cannot find solace in situations where they do need some sort of divine intervention (a mother dying from cancer for instance), but at the same time, I don't think that popular culture should dictate what people believe in either.

    If someone wants to believe in certain traditions (and therefore certain doctrines as well), they should be able to do so without fear that they will be contravening legislation just by acting within that certain remit.
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    (Original post by Aphotic Cosmos)
    The Pope is not visiting in his capacity as head of state of the [diplomatically irrelevant] Vatican state, he is visiting as a religious leader on the invitation of the government.
    He will meet Britains head of state, he is a head of state. Therefore, de facto, a state visit.
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    (Original post by adamrules247)
    He will meet Britains head of state, he is a head of state. Therefore, de facto, a state visit.
    Maybe. But at any rate, certainly not de jure.
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    Maybe. But at any rate, certainly not de jure.
    Oh come onnn! Smells like a state visit, looks like a state visit, tastes like a state visit. It is a state visit, the only thing wrong is the name.
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    (Original post by Spacecam)
    £20M will probably be needed as protection for the poor man, from militant atheists and disgruntled muslims.
    Does this term people use have any basis in reality?

    The only atheist activity I've ever seen in this country has been entirely peaceful and polite. How much 'protection' does the Pope really need from the atheist community in Britain? What are they going to do, throw leaflets at him?
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    we don't have this big debate when the royal family use millions of pounds to go places, repair homes, buy homes, add to their art collections, etc.

    as said before, £20m is nothing to anyone, it'll do more good than harm to the UK, especially since it's Scotland he's visiting , where there is a higher concentration of catholics than England

    these athiests need to respect people's beliefs, and not just worry about 'the government's money': you have quite a sad life if all you're thinking about is a harmless visit by the pope, which would please millions..
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    (Original post by adamrules247)
    He will meet Britains head of state, he is a head of state. Therefore, de facto, a state visit.
    and talk about what? current economic situation? :toofunny:
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    (Original post by Lord Hysteria)
    and talk about what? current economic situation?
    Well for example to anglican/catholic situations, in fact, recently HM dispatched the Lord Champerlain to discuss Her worries with the thing introduced by the Pope for Anglicans to convert the Catholicism.

    Also about Christian/Muslim relationship/society, etc.
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    The Pope’s visit will mean a lot for the Catholics in the country, I am assuming – I am not Catholic. Also, more pressingly, what harm could come of it? He’ll visit then he’ll leave – the MP’s will have less money to steal from us for their Hobnobs, were assuming that by him not coming that the money will go to what’s needed in the country – wrong! The government will probably find another way to screw us all over and waste it. At least the Pope coming will make some people happy, either that or another Duck pond.
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    (Original post by S.R91)
    At least the Pope coming will make some people happy, either that or another Duck pond.
    hahaa, i like (the duck pond)

    He may make some Catholic's happy. But he'll make a hell of a lot more people who care about liberty and freedom of sexuality very unhappy. He's a fascist, and I don't think we should be welcoming him.

    Something else upsetting is that Gordon Brown said it would be 'inappropriate' for him to comment on the Pope's visit. If this man thinks he has the right to govern, should he not be prepared to say what he thinks? Show his views?
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    (Original post by Kreuzuerk)
    Maybe. But at any rate, certainly not de jure.
    Well of course, there has never been a legal requirement to conduct state visits; your statement is nothing more than otiose.
 
 
 
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