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★ Student Loans - How many can i get? ★ watch

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    Right...

    At the moment I have only got into Glamorgan's Performance and Media course...and was wondering is it possible to go on this course for a year, then come next year reapply. Say I get in somewhere else (on a Acting course) would I be able to take another student loan out to cover these three years, if I have already had a year's loan on the other course??!!

    :confused:

    Help appreciated!

    xx
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    Yes, all students are entitled to one more 'additional year' of funding to complete their degree.

    So you could start one course, do one year and then transfer to the first year of another course with no problems.

    However, if you fail a year of your new course you will have lost your additional year 'safety net' and so you would have to pay your own fees for any repeat years (unless you have a valid health reason for failing)
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    Okay thanks

    So each year at University is individualy graded then?

    x
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    (Original post by Sasha_xx)
    Okay thanks

    So each year at University is individualy graded then?

    x
    I am not sure what you mean by graded

    You have to apply each year for funding and plenty of students withdraw, transfer or suspend their studies each year.

    The rule is that you can have the same number of years funding as the number of years your course is plus one additional year.
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    The formula they use is:
    (Length of new course + 1) - (Years of previous study).

    If you have to fund any part of the new degree, it has to be payed at the start rather than the end as well.
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    (Original post by MulderMan)
    The formula they use is:
    (Length of new course + 1) - (Years of previous study).

    If you have to fund any part of the new degree, it has to be payed at the start rather than the end as well.
    This is correct. So, if you do one year of your current course, and then move on to another course, you'll be fine.

    If you did two years of your current course, and then moved to a new one, you'd have done an additional year that would not be funded. To make up for this, you'd have to pay for the first year of your new course.
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    Surely UCAS won't let you apply to another course if you're at uni. Would the OP not have to drop out of the Glamorgan course first before applying again and then risk not getting in anywhere?
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    Apparently you can get 4 years of funding.

    I was on the first year of my course at Blackpool last year, but then decided to transfer to St Helens this year. Due to several reasons I decided to start afresh and am currently studying the first year of the course at St Helens. And I still got my loan for this year, and will do until I finish my course in 2012. I just had to get the uni to send a transfer form to the student loans company to let them know and it was sorted.

    Each year you have to re-apply for a new loan for the following academic year.

    So yes you should be fine.
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    (Original post by MulderMan)
    The formula they use is:
    (Length of new course + 1) - (Years of previous study).

    If you have to fund any part of the new degree, it has to be payed at the start rather than the end as well.
    Does this mean that if you do a bachelors degree at one university, then go to another to do your masters, you don't get a loan for the masters year?
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    (Original post by elliotcallard)
    Surely UCAS won't let you apply to another course if you're at uni. Would the OP not have to drop out of the Glamorgan course first before applying again and then risk not getting in anywhere?
    Nope, you can do this while you are still on your current course.
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    (Original post by Iamarapist)
    Does this mean that if you do a bachelors degree at one university, then go to another to do your masters, you don't get a loan for the masters year?
    There is currently NO government funding for a masters degree.

    It has to be self funded, or through a bank loan or Career Development Loan.

    Sorry!
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    (Original post by _Shanice_)
    Apparently you can get 4 years of funding.
    No, as others have said it is the length of your new course + 1 years.
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    (Original post by MulderMan)
    There is currently NO government funding for a masters degree.

    It has to be self funded, or through a bank loan or Career Development Loan.

    Sorry!
    Not totally true. If you are on a masters undergraduate degree (ie your first degree will be a masters), then you're covered for the full length of the course (ie 4 years). If you do a masters as a postgraduate degree (or second degree), you don't get covered.
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    (Original post by DMed)
    Not totally true. If you are on a masters undergraduate degree (ie your first degree will be a masters), then you're covered for the full length of the course (ie 4 years). If you do a masters as a postgraduate degree (or second degree), you don't get covered.
    Ah okay thanks for clearing that up.
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    (Original post by sandettielightvessel)
    No, as others have said it is the length of your new course + 1 years.
    And it's more common for a course to be 3 years long rather than 4 or 5. And anyway I was only saying what I'd been told and replying to the OP, I didn't need you quoting me to correct it.
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    (Original post by elliotcallard)
    Surely UCAS won't let you apply to another course if you're at uni. Would the OP not have to drop out of the Glamorgan course first before applying again and then risk not getting in anywhere?

    What's the OP?

    xx
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    (Original post by MulderMan)
    The formula they use is:
    (Length of new course + 1) - (Years of previous study).

    If you have to fund any part of the new degree, it has to be payed at the start rather than the end as well.
    I'm really not sure if that's correct...

    I did a year at another university then switched to my current course. My new course is 4 years and I was told by Student Finance I'd have to pay for my final year myself.

    A) New course = 4 years + 1 = 5 years - 1 year of study = 4 years, so why can't I get funding for this degree?

    B) Nobody ever told me I had to pay at the start of my degree, why would that make any sense? I wouldn't pay for my final year before I'd even started, surely?

    I'm all worried now.
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    (Original post by DMed)
    Not totally true. If you are on a masters undergraduate degree (ie your first degree will be a masters), then you're covered for the full length of the course (ie 4 years). If you do a masters as a postgraduate degree (or second degree), you don't get covered.

    Oh I know, I'm doing an MSci myself.

    It was just in reply to the poster, they said 'go on to do their masters', i.e. an actual masters course.

    mimimimi, that is the common formula stated in SFE regulations. So there must be something different up with your application.

    Maybe someone like Taiko could help?

    Also, it would be the first year not the last year that you would pay for.
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    (Original post by mimimimi)
    I'm really not sure if that's correct...

    I did a year at another university then switched to my current course. My new course is 4 years and I was told by Student Finance I'd have to pay for my final year myself.

    A) New course = 4 years + 1 = 5 years - 1 year of study = 4 years, so why can't I get funding for this degree?

    B) Nobody ever told me I had to pay at the start of my degree, why would that make any sense? I wouldn't pay for my final year before I'd even started, surely?

    I'm all worried now.
    It is correct, and it's likely that something has either gone wrong with your application, or that your personal circumstances are different in some way.

    You pay, usually, for the start of your degree rather than the end, because they can't 'depend' on you completing your second qualification either, and want you to start the funding yourself.

    It might be worth phoning up to ask about your circumstances if you're unsure. :yep:
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    (Original post by cpj1987)
    It is correct, and it's likely that something has either gone wrong with your application, or that your personal circumstances are different in some way.

    You pay, usually, for the start of your degree rather than the end, because they can't 'depend' on you completing your second qualification either, and want you to start the funding yourself.

    It might be worth phoning up to ask about your circumstances if you're unsure. :yep:
    How strange! I think I'd better call them... Do you mean to say I could potentially get funding for my final year? That would be rather amazing... They definitely never asked me to pay for my first year of this course, and gave me finance for it!
 
 
 
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