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if the Conservaives get into power could they reverse devolution watch

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    since the uk has an uncodified constitution and devolution is not like 'entrenched', could a new government decide to centralize government again? and generally reverse all constitutional reforms made since, say, 1997?
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    The conservatives fancy more devolution though!
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    They could, but they're not going to.

    Devolution is one of the few things this government did that I agree with, along with longer opening hours and depressingly little else.
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    (Original post by RooKnight)
    The conservatives fancy more devolution though!
    I'm not sure this is true. The Tories supported devolution in Northern Ireland, but opposed devolution to Wales and Scotland. In one of his conference speeches he talked of "devotion" to the Union.
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    (Original post by anna_disraeli)
    since the uk has an uncodified constitution and devolution is not like 'entrenched', could a new government decide to centralize government again? and generally reverse all constitutional reforms made since, say, 1997?
    Technically, a referendum does entrench a policy. If the Tories wanted to shut down the Scottish Parliament they'd need to hold another referendum to do it.
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    (Original post by jacketpotato)
    I'm not sure this is true. The Tories supported devolution in Northern Ireland, but opposed devolution to Wales and Scotland. In one of his conference speeches he talked of "devotion" to the Union.
    They are generally in favour of a decentralisation of power though, and it looks likely they'd give devolved governments more powers. Handing responsibility to the Scots over income tax has been discussed.
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    What about England? Why can't we have an English parliament?

    Why can't we have England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland having their own parliament, taking care of their own domestic issues and have Westminister as the parliament taking care of external issues?
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    (Original post by Wolves130)
    Technically, a referendum does entrench a policy. If the Tories wanted to shut down the Scottish Parliament they'd need to hold another referendum to do it.
    They don't they just need to pass an act. But yeah politically they couldn't get away with it/wont try.
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    Sure hope so.
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    (Original post by Wolves130)
    Technically, a referendum does entrench a policy. If the Tories wanted to shut down the Scottish Parliament they'd need to hold another referendum to do it.
    They wouldn't "need" to, in theory. Parliamentary sovereignty and all that.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    They don't they just need to pass an act. But yeah politically they couldn't get away with it/wont try.
    I know, thats why I said technically :p:
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    (Original post by anna_disraeli)
    since the uk has an uncodified constitution and devolution is not like 'entrenched', could a new government decide to centralize government again? and generally reverse all constitutional reforms made since, say, 1997?
    It would be extremely unconstitutional in practice.
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    Yes they could. Due to uncodified constitution and Parliamentary sovereignty whatever the newly elected Torrie Goverment wanted to do would get implimented; within reason. It's likely to be extremely unpopular and there is little chance that they will do this without first holding a referendum to get public opinion in the effected areas. Scotland and Wales need England's economy to stay strong. They would be particularly weak without England.
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    (Original post by Folderol)
    They wouldn't "need" to, in theory. Parliamentary sovereignty and all that.
    Thats why I said technically lol
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    (Original post by Wolves130)
    Thats why I said technically lol
    In theory, means they don't technically have to :shifty:
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    (Original post by TheMeister)
    It would be extremely unconstitutional in practice.
    Only as unconstitutional as no asking the whole of the UK if there should be a scottish parliament in the first place. Westminster reserved the right to revoke devolution.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    Only as unconstitutional as no asking the whole of the UK if there should be a scottish parliament in the first place. Westminster reserved the right to revoke devolution.
    Look, we're on the same side here; I want devolution like I do genital warts.

    Parliament does hold the right to repeal the laws that introduced devolution, but what I'm saying is that any future government would not want to risk losing electoral support over an issue which few people pay scant regard to.
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    It's most unlikely the Conservatives would seek to reverse devolution. Just look at Wales, in 1997 they had not a single MP then two years later after the Assembly elections they had political voice and a decade later they top the polls in the (admittedly poorly turned-out for) European Elections. In other words, devolution has been fundamentally necessary for the political resurrection of the Tories in Wales (and Scotland as well). And what goes hand in hand with more powers: fewer Westminster MPs and that means fewer Labour heartland seats and therefore more chance of Tories being in power for longer spells thanks to their core English vote. Not to mention the fact that the Tories in Wales are no longer anti-devolution; they may be unionists but weak ones.

    Devolution, I'd go as far to say, is the constitutional status quo now and rightly so; it's just a pity the English haven't had their own parliament too.
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    (Original post by Wolves130)
    Technically, a referendum does entrench a policy. If the Tories wanted to shut down the Scottish Parliament they'd need to hold another referendum to do it.
    According to what lawful authority...? The Doctrine of Parliamentary Supremacy sort of directly contradicts this.
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    They could, yes. So could Labour, or any other party or coalition of parties with a Parliamentary majority. No Parliament can bind its successors*, its nothing to do with having a codified constitution because the rule of Parliamentary supremacy is part of our constitution.

    They won't, though. Or, at least, I don't think they will.

    *First person to say "..but Factortame! Dicey's view of Parliamentary Sovereignty is nonsense!" goes on my ignore list. I know, I know, I know, but it doesn't matter here.
 
 
 
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