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    (Original post by josh_a_y)
    I couldnt tell you. I guess I was interested at the idea of learning how to diagnose, communicate with patients & generally helping them to have a better quality of life.
    EDIT: I have always wanted to be a psychiatrist, to understand how the mind works and things that could go wrong with it...I find the brain completely fascinating... But alot of the other biochemistry doesnt hold a lot of interest for me...
    Dude, this isn't an interview, why do you REALLY want to do it?
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    (Original post by TooSexyForMyStethoscope)
    Dude, this isn't an interview, why do you REALLY want to do it?
    believe it or not, some of us do want to do it for these reasons exactly.
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    (Original post by josh_a_y)
    I couldnt tell you. I guess I was interested at the idea of learning how to diagnose, communicate with patients & generally helping them to have a better quality of life.EDIT: I have always wanted to be a psychiatrist, to understand how the mind works and things that could go wrong with it...I find the brain completely fascinating... But alot of the other biochemistry doesnt hold a lot of interest for me...


    Sure, is that why you started a thread inquiring about actuarial sciences, and banking.
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    (Original post by blonde-beth)
    believe it or not, some of us do want to do it for these reasons exactly.
    Oh, please. That is just self-indulgent nonsense. We think that is why we want to do it, but in reality, applicants at the tender age of 17/18 have scarcely had the time to develop any serious convictions or principles, let alone set out on a crusade to help all the unfortunate people who end up in their care.:mad:
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    (Original post by TooSexyForMyStethoscope)
    Oh, please. That is just self-indulgent nonsense. We think that is why we want to do it, but in reality, applicants at the tender age of 17/18 have scarcely had the time to develop any serious convictions or principles, let alone set out on a crusade to help all the unfortunate people who end up in their care.:mad:
    you dont think that i, at 18, have any serious convictions or principles? im sorry but that is just complete rubbish. I agree that my reasons will perhaps deviate slightly when im an F1 and have filled in 100 too many blood forms, but my underlying principles will be the same, that i get such a buzz out of directly communicating with people and finding out what is wrong. i dont mean to be rude, and i really cant be bothered with an argument, but i am not the only one who has genuine reasons for wanting to become a doctor. without these reasons there is no way i would do it as the costs would outweigh the rewards!
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    (Original post by _Andrew_)
    Do they struggle? At the UEA open day, the dean said that there is a study which shows that people that don't take Biology A level, generally do less well in the first year in comparison to people that do take it. As such, UEA don't even stipulate an A level chemistry requirement :beard:
    Umm, At Bristol most things are covered well enough that you don't need it, and they run extra tutorials/thingys for non biolgs. My friend didn't do it and seems to be doing fine.

    Biochemistry is a big part of the course, but I'm not gonna lie, its taken til me getting to uni for me to understand respiration properly. but that could be cos it was explained properly and fully makes sense now..

    I dunno, just had a penny drop moment!

    sorry rambley ramble
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    (Original post by blonde-beth)
    you dont think that i, at 18, have any serious convictions or principles? im sorry but that is just complete rubbish. I agree that my reasons will perhaps deviate slightly when im an F1 and have filled in 100 too many blood forms, but my underlying principles will be the same, that i get such a buzz out of directly communicating with people and finding out what is wrong. i dont mean to be rude, and i really cant be bothered with an argument, but i am not the only one who has genuine reasons for wanting to become a doctor. without these reasons there is no way i would do it as the costs would outweigh the rewards!
    I agree - people do not change fundamently after they are about 14/16. Obviously they mature and things happen that maybe dent their 'innocence' but most older people would still recognise their younger self.
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    I don't think I recognise my self from 6 months ago, let alone 5 years.
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    (Original post by Phalanges)
    I don't think I recognise my self from 6 months ago, let alone 5 years.
    It's probably a man thing - girls maturing earlier and all that
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    (Original post by Phalanges)
    So your argument is that you agree with me and think the system should change to be more applied, but at the same time think that changing the system would be unfair on new people?

    How strange.



    That's a bit low, trying to write off my qualifications as inferior to yours. You should have taken IB, then you could really put your superiority complex to good use.

    Just for the record, I took AS Biology last year, so was actually on the new specification. I did no revision whatsoever (because it wasn't necessary for my offer) and averaged 95% across the papers. Now I know I got a lot wrong in the exams, so the grade boundaries must be so skewed that it's ridiculously easy to get a high mark. So personally I doubt that your course is significantly harder.



    Every A Level biologist will not go on and study medicine at university. It follows that every A Level biologist complaining about the exams is not wanting to do medicine. So I don't understand what you are trying to suggest.

    And if you didn't need knowledge, what was so hard about the exam? I could understand if you were expected to know something and didn't that you wouldn't be able to get the marks. But if it's just stuff you have to work out, I always used to class those as the easy exams.
    I dont want an arguement but I want to set you straight-ish :p:
    Exams should test you on your specification (and revision), this exam did not.
    I would accept a question on faunagoo if I took applied science or scientific theory (even general studies), but I took Biology and expect to be tested on what I have learnt.
    Im not in outrage but I think its really disapointing an exam board sets relatively irrevant questions in regards to the spec, when instead they could apply my knowledge of content rather than for me to guess or try to second guess a mark scheme. When considered this will ''unfairly'' ruin SOME peoples uni applications and I think it is unfair although unstoppable.
    There :yes:
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    changes -

    peeple get more layers as they get older, often till the older ones just arent visible anymore.

    thankfully!
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    (Original post by B Raven 01)
    Exams should test you on your specification (and revision), this exam did not.
    Nope, they should test that you can apply what you have learnt, i.e. apply the principles you know to unfamiliar scenarios - surely that's a better test of ability than regurgitating facts...?
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    (Original post by TooSexyForMyStethoscope)
    Oh, please. That is just self-indulgent nonsense. We think that is why we want to do it, but in reality, applicants at the tender age of 17/18 have scarcely had the time to develop any serious convictions or principles, let alone set out on a crusade to help all the unfortunate people who end up in their care.:mad:
    I've seen you post around here, and if I do say so I find your posts extremely cynical and generally not helpful. Just because you claim our intentions in medicine are self-indulgent and nonsensical does not make them self-indulgent and nonsensical. These are the reasons I (and plenty of others) want to do medicine. There is no 'thinking' that is why we want to do it, it IS why we want to do it. And you are in no position to try and insinuate otherwise, because you have not got a single clue.
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    yet its pretty true for most applicants, in part at least. virtually all of them will wax about heir interest in the ealthcare professio, yet virtually none will ave looked at oter aspectsof ealthcare beyond a medicine. why such a massive discrepncy?

    tbh, thats a staple reply for a medic, your is, Woodie, to deny the existence of beliefs that they feel conflict with there belief system. is where our 'strength' comes from.

    is there a need for the OP's negativity?
    no, no need. but it would 'elp 'undreds of applicants reassess themselves to the point where they might find out better what they really want to do in life. no need to put them on the right path, but it elps to take them off the wrong path - after all they only get one life.
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    (Original post by Gizmo!)
    tbh, thats a staple reply for a medic, your is, Woodie, to deny the existence of beliefs that they feel conflict with there belief system. is where our 'strength' comes from.
    Could you please point out the beliefs that I am denying?
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    well thats clear to a chimp from the posts above surely? i dont see your benefit in chumping up about it.

    neither would it benefit me to chump up - so- - many applicants ignore the real reasons for them picking medicine, and settle on unrealistic reasons that the OP mentioned.
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    (Original post by Gizmo!)
    well thats clear to a chimp from the posts above surely? i dont see your benefit in chumping up about it.

    neither would it benefit me to chump up - so- - many applicants ignore the real reasons for them picking medicine, and settle on unrealistic reasons that the OP mentioned.
    No, I'm being a bit dense today, please do explain what the reasons are. Because in my heart of hearts I can't see any ulterior motives, I do not see myself ignoring the real reasons for picking medicine, because I feel the aforementioned ones are my genuine ones, and I think a lot of people are like that too.
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    (Original post by Woody.)
    No, I'm being a bit dense today, please do explain what the reasons are. Because in my heart of hearts I can't see any ulterior motives, I do not see myself ignoring the real reasons for picking medicine, because I feel the aforementioned ones are my genuine ones, and I think a lot of people are like that too.
    i just did explain. god, why arent you reading before you reply.

    although i see you've substituted the word 'i' for 'many applicants', god knows why you are playing silly buggers.
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    (Original post by Gizmo!)
    i just did explain. god, why arent you reading before you reply.

    although i see you've substituted the word 'i' for 'many applicants', god knows why you are playing silly buggers.
    I am reading, unless I've lost the reason somewhere in your rather difficult to understand dialect, all I can see is that you've said the reasons are in the above post (which I couldn't find, call me dense), and that applicants settle on unrealistic reasons, and, I'm trying to tell you that I don't see those unrealistic reasons, and my personal reasons are the ones I have aforementioned. You also used the term 'many applicants ignore the real reasons' - I'm not sure why there's such a problem with it. So, if you could actually mention these reasons I ignore, that'd be great.
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    Considering Biology at A-Level seems to be mainly stats, I'd say no. Unless you mean the physiology is boring?
 
 
 
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