Turn on thread page Beta
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    mom won't let me have it as she doesnt think its necessary if ur not promiscuous
    i had the 1st out of 3 though....did it without consulting her ...oops
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I'm too old, I'm afraid. I would have liked it, but mum asked our practice nurse and she didn't seem too sure about how they were offering it to older people. =/ Kind of forgotten about it now, but I was only about a year too old. What difference does that make? D:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by squeak)
    NHS website about people who are eligible:

    Girls born before 1st September 1990 - there is no current plan to offer the vaccine to those aged 18 and over as part of a national programme.
    Oh right. The lady probably lied, cos a few girls in our 6th form are 19 and she said they could... :confused:
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Like the way you ignore the rest of the post.

    You said above it's rare. I believe it's the second most common cancer in Women, although I may be wrong. Still would not rather take the chance over being scared of a needle.
    It is rare. It is the 12th most common type of cancer in women, accounting for 2% of female cancers. You have a 1 in 145 chance of getting cervical cancer in your lifetime. To put it into perspective, you have a 1 in 3 chance of getting cancer in general, a 1 in 8 chance of getting breast cancer, and a 1 in 16 chance of getting lung cancer.

    You have a 1 in 435 chance that you will die from cervical cancer, and a 1 in 5 chance that you will die from cancer in general.

    I ignored the rest of your post because you didn't seem to have a point. You basically said 'the vaccine must be safe because there's scaremongering around every vaccine'. Watertight argument, that. The fact is, it's far too soon to know what the long-term effects of the vaccine is. Some people would rather accept the tiny chance that they'll get cervical cancer than take a drug with unknown effects. That's perfectly understandable.
    Offline

    10
    ReputationRep:
    Year 12, in the catch-up scheme and the majority of my friends have had letters about it and most are having their third jab around about now but I haven't had my letter yet i don't think I'll bother unless they send me a letter though, my mum doesn't even want me to have it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by lottie1992)
    Actually, I did a lot of research before deciding that I did not want the vaccine. Did you know that the long-term effects of having it are only tested on female rats, and that it is thought that it will only be effective for 7-10 years before needing a booster? Did you also know that the vaccine should NEVER be given to someone who could possibly be carrying the HPV vaccine or pregnant? The NHS dosen't test for either, and the vaccine (cervarix) which they are using is not as tested as the American Guardasil.

    The longest period that the vaccine has been tested for is 5 years, and after that, no one knows. Feel reassured though, the vaccine had no long-term fertility effects on the rats, we'll just have to hope it's not another case of Thalidomide in 20 years time. Oh, and just to finish off, it's not 100% effective, as you've stated in your statistics above, and seeing as it's only been tested for 7 years and the trial girls aren't of the age likely to get cervical cancer, the scientists can't be sure that it even protects. This was my reason for not getting it. However, i do respect other people's opinions on the subject.
    You're looking at it as though its a new medication. It's not, it's a vaccine. It is like all the other vaccines out there, which have saved millions of lives around the world. It is entirely incomparable to thalidomide which was a medication and indeed should have gone through more rigourous testing procedures.

    Those kinds of rigourous testing procedures don't need to be AS rigourous for vaccines because we know they always use the same principle and have been used for over 200 years.

    Originally, back in Jenners day, they used a small amount of 'live' virus but these days they use inactivated viruses which pose no threat at all to people. There's a lot of evidence that even a newborn baby could handle hundreds of vaccines, there's no chance of overloading on them.

    They almost always require boosters, that's normal with vaccines. Obviously nothing is 100% effective because not everyone's the same and there's going to be that 1 in 10,000 person that doesn't generate the antibodies. But this vaccine is not 'live' so even that 1 in 10,000 person will be fine, they just won't have HPV protection. They won't have a bad reaction.

    The reason it must 'never' be given to someone with HPV already or who is pregnant is that it is not licensed for those uses because it's not been tested on these. They are being ultra careful.

    So yes, you've done some research but obviously not enough.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I didn't have it...not sure why really, just I got my appointment through the day before so I wasn't given much chance to think about it. I've had bad experiences with injections in the past, one leading to meningitis and the other causing partial deafness through a virus contracted, and as there isn't a history of cancer in my family, it was a risk I was willing to take.
    Offline

    11
    ReputationRep:
    I turned 19 before it was offered.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Pink Bullets)
    The fact is, it's far too soon to know what the long-term effects of the vaccine is. Some people would rather accept the tiny chance that they'll get cervical cancer than take a drug with unknown effects. That's perfectly understandable.
    I'd say a 1 in 145 chance is quite high really. Just because some cancers are more common, it doesn't mean we should ignore a chance to get rid of the less common cancers!!

    No it's not too soon to know the long term effects.. its' a vaccine that works like all the other vaccines, exactly the same. Infact safer than the original vaccines because these days they aren't 'live'. But even then, they were fine.

    A vaccine is not a drug.


    And yet if you got ill and your GP prescribed you a medicine, I bet you'd take it without a second thought. If you wanted contraception, you'd probably get The Pill or an implant or something without much thought.

    And if you had a baby, you'd probably get it immunised. And you'd be crazy not to....
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Im 17 and havent had it....not really sure why not, I read about some health risks associated so I didnt. Should I be getting it done?
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    I haven't been offered and I'm 17. I don't think I want it, anyway. :ninja:
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    I haven't had it.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I've had the first 2 but I'm struggling getting the third cos I've moved from England to Scotland and its administered differently here. I want to get it soon cos its due now and I turn 19 in april. Does anyone know how much it is private?
    Offline

    20
    (Original post by Ladipidoo)
    I haven't been offered and I'm 17. I don't think I want it, anyway. :ninja:
    Hey. :wink2:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I was offered it, and was supposed to get it, but i keep missing appointments. I'm also deathly afraid of needles, and will pass out if it even came near me. :woo:
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I looked into it, but when I looked they were targetting 13 year olds, so they said I wasn't able to get it. Then when other people were getting jabs, I just wasn't told about it being available. Only years 8-11 got the jabs at my school. I think it's something you have to explicitly ask for, and apart from the first time, I just haven't.
    Offline

    13
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by letsdothetimewarpagain)
    I'm supposed to be in the catch up thing but I don't think I'll get it done, me and needles are an awful mix
    This is the same with me. Although I have a suspected tear in my wrist and they're going to stick a camera on a needle into it to see what's going on and that's apparently a really big needle :cry2:
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by + polarity -)
    Hey. :wink2:
    Hey, you! :wink2::wink2::wink2::wink2:




    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    i was offered it, but chose not to have it.

    at the time, i was put off by the fact that it was a very new vaccine and there was very little research evidence for it's effectiveness and long-term consequences, and also because i thought that not being promiscuous was probably the best way to protect against cervical cancer. also, i hate needles/injections in general.

    i don't regret it because it made a lot of people at my school ill, and many chose not to have their second or third dose anyway. at first, my mum was quite angry at me for deciding not to have it, but she now agrees with me and was quite wary about my little sister having it. it's a personal choice, i guess. i'm not against people having it at all, but equally i don't think it's right to call others silly/irresponsible if they choose not to.
    Offline

    20
    (Original post by Ladipidoo)
    Hey, you! :wink2::wink2::wink2::wink2:




    Yo, don't hold back on the :wink2:s. What's hannenin'?

    I haven't had the jab, but I think it's already been covered in the OP.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
Turn on thread page Beta
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: February 5, 2010
The home of Results and Clearing

1,267

people online now

1,567,000

students helped last year
Poll
A-level students - how do you feel about your results?

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.