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    This is mostly for WPB but i thought i would share. Feel free to add comment but be nice :hmmm:

    Ingredients;

    500g or so of stewing or braising steak (get it from the butchers if you can, it's cheaper and tastier)
    Either 1 packet of pre-rolled pastry or make your own.
    1 onion
    1 medium carrot
    3 medium mushrooms
    1 chilli (de seeded we aren't going for spicy here)
    a few spring onions
    400ml of ale (just get what's on offer at the shop and then drink the rest)
    2 garlic cloves
    4 beef stock cubes (are the real stuff if you have it)
    900mls of hot water
    Knob of butter
    1 TBSP of tomato paste
    1 TSP of thyme
    1 TSP of sage
    1 TSP Worcester sauce
    1 TBSP of plain flour
    Salt and Pepper to taste.

    1. Put the flour, herbs, salt and pepper in a bowl and add the steak, coating it all really well.

    2. Put that to one side and in a large saucepan put in the butter, allow to melt and add the onions and cook and till translucent. Add the garlic and allow to cook for a few minutes making sure it doesn't burn.

    3. Add the steak and cook until it is brown and sealed all over.

    4. Add about 100ml of the ale and turn up the heat so it starts to bubble. You are using the ale to pick up all the juices from the meat and you should see it thicken. To this add the paste, Worcester Sauce and finely chopped chilli and give it a good stir.

    5. Whilst this is happening, chop you veg up (the veg i used is just what i like, you can use pretty much whatever you fancy).

    6. Add the rest of the ale cook for a few minutes and then add your stock cubes which are mixed with about 900mls of hot water so it is dissolved.

    7. Add your veg to the mix and bring to the boil for about 2 minutes, make sure you stir it so you get all that loveliness off the bottom.

    8. Stick and lid on it, turn the heat down and leave it to simmer away for about 1.5hours, stirring occasionally.

    9. Once cooked, roll out the pastry into a pie dish, put in the filling, put a lid on it and cook for about 20 minutes.

    10. Serve with mash and green beans (if you want, chips are just as good :p: )

    Enjoy
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    that sounds delicious...something to try methinks! thanks for the recipe
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    Fantastic! I am going to try this soon.
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    I'm making a pie right now but I don't think it will be as nice as that one sounds.
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    It tasted better the second day too! I found that the filling didn't thicken as quickly as i hoped so i added corn flour and turned up the heat and it managed quite nicely after that!
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    (Original post by Trigger)
    This is mostly for WPB but i thought i would share. Feel free to add comment but be nice :hmmm:

    Ingredients;

    500g or so of stewing or braising steak (get it from the butchers if you can, it's cheaper and tastier)
    Either 1 packet of pre-rolled pastry or make your own.
    1 onion
    1 medium carrot
    3 medium mushrooms
    1 chilli (de seeded we aren't going for spicy here)
    a few spring onions
    400ml of ale (just get what's on offer at the shop and then drink the rest)
    2 garlic cloves
    4 beef stock cubes (are the real stuff if you have it)
    900mls of hot water
    Knob of butter
    1 TBSP of tomato paste
    1 TSP of thyme
    1 TSP of sage
    1 TSP Worcester sauce
    1 TBSP of plain flour
    Salt and Pepper to taste.

    1. Put the flour, herbs, salt and pepper in a bowl and add the steak, coating it all really well.

    2. Put that to one side and in a large saucepan put in the butter, allow to melt and add the onions and cook and till translucent. Add the garlic and allow to cook for a few minutes making sure it doesn't burn.

    3. Add the steak and cook until it is brown and sealed all over.

    4. Add about 100ml of the ale and turn up the heat so it starts to bubble. You are using the ale to pick up all the juices from the meat and you should see it thicken. To this add the paste, Worcester Sauce and finely chopped chilli and give it a good stir.

    5. Whilst this is happening, chop you veg up (the veg i used is just what i like, you can use pretty much whatever you fancy).

    6. Add the rest of the ale cook for a few minutes and then add your stock cubes which are mixed with about 900mls of hot water so it is dissolved.

    7. Add your veg to the mix and bring to the boil for about 2 minutes, make sure you stir it so you get all that loveliness off the bottom.

    8. Stick and lid on it, turn the heat down and leave it to simmer away for about 1.5hours, stirring occasionally.

    9. Once cooked, roll out the pastry into a pie dish, put in the filling, put a lid on it and cook for about 20 minutes.

    10. Serve with mash and green beans (if you want, chips are just as good :p: )

    Enjoy
    :yy: Very nice.

    I made a very similar steak and guinness pie the other day and it was delish :yep:

    Making your own pastry is thoroughly recommended! It's much better than pre-packed stuff

    Oh and my ale/ sauce took longer than expected to thicken too, but once it did... :coma:
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    I make my own pastry :yes:
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    I'm gonna try this either tonight or tomorrow night, depends on my motivation. I shall report on the outcome :mmm: (I'll use supermarket pastry though, never made it myself before)

    Thanks again for the recipe btw
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    No worries, i love sharing recipes.
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    Very nice! My one bit of advice (hope i'm not stepping on your toes here trigger) is if you want the best meat, chuck or skirt are fantastic - really nice and lean and go fantastically tender, and shin is pretty good for this too. Also, Joseph holt's maple ale is STUNNING for this recipe. gives it a lovely golden caramel gravy with lots of richness. Top recipe trigger, alot like mine - I've still got 3 portions in the freezer from the last time I made a batch up
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    Not at all, i was actually expecting you to be an ******* about it. The recipe is steered towards those on a budget but by all means splash cash on good ale and meat if you can spare it, it really makes a difference.
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    (Original post by Trigger)
    Not at all, i was actually expecting you to be an ******* about it. The recipe is steered towards those on a budget but by all means splash cash on good ale and meat if you can spare it, it really makes a difference.

    :O I wouldn't dare. Joseph holts is 2 for £4 in sainsburys' - I usually get a bottle of maple ale for cooking, and a humdinger for drinking :P My local butcher does Skirt and chuck for £5 a kilo, which is pretty bargainous. Ideal for any long/slow cooking recipe. I got 7 portions for about £13 last time I made it, and there's ALOT of meat in it.
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    I finally made it. With rice. :coma: god that was tasty.
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    (Original post by lodzinski)
    My local butcher does Skirt and chuck for £5 a kilo, which is pretty bargainous. Ideal for any long/slow cooking recipe. I got 7 portions for about £13 last time I made it, and there's ALOT of meat in it.
    That's a good shout, actually, even for supermarkets if local butchers and the like aren't easily accessible. I've only discovered buying off the counter this year and I won't be looking back.

    Beef shin, for example, goes for less than 50p/100 grams (or £5/kilo, but a kilogram of something is hard for poor students cooking for one to visualise!) - making shin ~£1 per portion for good quality meat even if a lesser cut. Ditto to things like ham: I'd much rather pay a fraction of the cost of packaged ham (obviously discounting the reconstituted wafer-thin stuff) and watch the butcher carve it off the joint to my spec.
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    I may have to post my Teryaki chicken recipe up next...
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    Om nom nom nom
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    OP little tip, once you have simmered the pie filling for 1.5hours you could then scoop out all of the ingredients (beef, veg, etc) into a bowl. Then turn the heat up to hottest and leave the sauce to boil until it reduces to the right consistency. This allows it to thicken from the fat in the beef and the small amount of flour at the beginning. The sauce should have a nice sheen to it and be really nice. The bad thing with corn flour is that it can make sauces very gloopy. Then once reduced continue your recipe as normal. Sounds delicious though!
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    (Original post by GQ.)
    OP little tip, once you have simmered the pie filling for 1.5hours you could then scoop out all of the ingredients (beef, veg, etc) into a bowl. Then turn the heat up to hottest and leave the sauce to boil until it reduces to the right consistency. This allows it to thicken from the fat in the beef and the small amount of flour at the beginning. The sauce should have a nice sheen to it and be really nice. The bad thing with corn flour is that it can make sauces very gloopy. Then once reduced continue your recipe as normal. Sounds delicious though!
    I didn't have any gloopyness but thanks for the tip
 
 
 
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