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Monitoring primary school children for extremist indoctrination. Opinions? watch

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    I was listening to an interesting debate on the radio earlier about how the government are now thinking about stopping terrorism in the future by monitoring children as young as 5/6 for extremists views/values in schools.

    This would mean keeping an eye on children and reporting anything which could indictate 'indoctrination' or extremist beliefs.

    They brought up the case of James Bulger and how the teachers/friends etc. of the two murderers must have noticed that they weren't normal children and that they harboured disgustingly violent thoughts. If only someone had paid more attention, the death of the poor 2 year old boy could have been avoided, it was argued.

    What are your opinions on this?

    Personally, I'm split. I think that we should keep an eye out for anything that's obviously suspicious, weird or wrong. But then I'm concerned that then it would cause young children to be wary of each other, especially Muslims (please don't get offended) and create rifts, gangs and dislike base purely on religious belief.

    On the other hand, say we did find a 7 year old boy who idolised (say) Al Qaeda, what would we do? What could we do? Remove him from school? Remove him from his family, as they're the ones who have brought him up to be like that? But then what? And who are we to say that the way he has been brought up is wrong? Terrorism is a disgraceful thing, but if that family truly truly believed they were doing it for God/Allah? Do we have the right to act on something like this?

    /questions.

    (P.S. Please don't be too anti-Islamic/anti-whatever or racist - keep it at decent level )
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    waste of government money if its going to require all these laws and things to be passed or listening equipment and that. teachers should just be encouraged to listen out for these things just like you said and also as you said what would they do about it...it could be innocent
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    Unknown? approves. :yep:
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    (Original post by Unknown?)
    Unknown? approves. :yep:
    You think that it's good to monitor primary schooll children then?

    I'm actually so split on this. I'm trying to imagine me back at primary school - I bet I'd probably get extra 'monitoring' simply because I'm brown (blunt but true).
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    First thing terrorist cells would teach and indoctrinate the children into would be keeping a low profile.

    Doing this is as retarded as expecting a terrorist to be wearing a full Islamic attire - they want to blend in, not stand out.

    Government have to look like they're doing something though :r
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    (Original post by fox_the_fix)
    First thing terrorist cells would teach and indoctrinate the children into would be keeping a low profile.

    Doing this is as retarded as expecting a terrorist to be wearing a full Islamic attire - they want to blend in, not stand out.

    Government have to look like they're doing something though :r
    Young children are hardly discrete about things though. I'm not saying they'll walk around with "I <3 Al Qaeda" shirts, but maybe with the things they say outloud?

    "Yeah but you have to do this ____ because Allah says so, otherwise you'll spend the rest of eternity in pain" or something. But then where does the line get drawn between extremism and general belief? Hmm.
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    (Original post by CityOfMyHeart)
    Young children are hardly discrete about things though. I'm not saying they'll walk around with "I <3 Al Qaeda" shirts, but maybe with the things they say outloud?

    "Yeah but you have to do this ____ because Allah says so, otherwise you'll spend the rest of eternity in pain" or something. But then where does the line get drawn between extremism and general belief? Hmm.
    You're exactly right. Which therefore questions this whole concept of people indoctrinating infants into extreme terrorism. What they would be doing is indoctrinating them into their perspective of Islam, and when the child has been integrated into that - expanding into militarism etc
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    Probably better off being concerned with universities than primary school children, like UCL for example.
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    (Original post by fox_the_fix)
    You're exactly right. Which therefore questions this whole concept of people indoctrinating infants into extreme terrorism. What they would be doing is indoctrinating them into their perspective of Islam, and when the child has been integrated into that - expanding into militarism etc
    Yeah exactly! And then, because we 'westerners' think that those Islamic beliefs are extreme, we think they're wrong. But then what gives us the right to say 'no, you can't think that', other than the fact that this is the UK and not a predominantly Muslim country?

    So many issues, man. These kinds of things make me sad - too many people are brought up to believe something but then they never question it either because it's never occured to them to do so, or because no matter what happens, they'll be made to stick to that one religion for their entire life.
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    (Original post by CityOfMyHeart)
    Young children are hardly discrete about things though. I'm not saying they'll walk around with "I <3 Al Qaeda" shirts, but maybe with the things they say outloud?

    "Yeah but you have to do this ____ because Allah says so, otherwise you'll spend the rest of eternity in pain" or something. But then where does the line get drawn between extremism and general belief? Hmm.
    This is true, and not just for Islam. All sounds a bit creepy to me though, what are they supposed to do anyway? Send them off for "re-education"?

    Teachers have enough to worry about but they're not dumb, I did work experience in a Primary School and they would probably notice if something really dodgy was going on. In my [limited] experience with Muslim children, they were often the most articulate and polite in the whole class. It's the white kids who can't read or tell the time despite being 9 years old that the teachers should be worrying about.
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    (Original post by cardine92)
    This is true, and not just for Islam. All sounds a bit creepy to me though, what are they supposed to do anyway? Send them off for "re-education"?

    Teachers have enough to worry about but they're not dumb, I did work experience in a Primary School and they would probably notice if something really dodgy was going on. In my [limited] experience with Muslim children, they were often the most articulate and polite in the whole class. It's the white kids who can't read or tell the time despite being 9 years old that the teachers should be worrying about.
    I agree that that's worrying too. I know teacher's aren't stupid and will pick up on anything really suspicious or bad or whatever. But the gov. are/were thinking of making teachers 'spy' on children a bit more, in the sense that anything seen as vaguely extremist should be reported.

    Education's going down and the divide between clever/not-so-clever and rich/poor is getting wider. Does anyone see that as a problem which could help religious extremists in some way?
 
 
 
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