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    (Original post by DJkG.1)
    Yes of course.

    But Asians don't get a new 'class' immediately when immigrating to Britain, they come with a 'social class' attached.

    Those who come as qualified doctors / engineers etc. from India / Pakistan etc. and buy a nice detached house with a couple of cars in the driveway in the UK are at the very least middle-class by any standards. They're likely to send their kids to private school and have somewhat more conservative but otherwise typically 'middle-class' views.

    Trust me, I know plenty.

    But the ones that are unskilled and hold typically working-class views (if such a notion exists) and continue to live as such won't be middle-class. This can change after the first generation but all to often it does not and you get a parallel lower-class Asian community alongside their counterpart British one - often fuel for tensions etc..
    I agree with your assesment on the whole.

    But any asian from india or pakistan who can come here, buy a detatched house with a few nice cars in the drive is far from 'middle class' back in their own country, I'd think.

    Also, due to them countries going through an industrial revolutions right now, the middle classes are only developing really (or only have in the last decade or so).
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    uytryfygijo;l
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    I'm a middle-class Asian from a private school hahha
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    (Original post by Johnthebaptist1)
    I agree with your assesment on the whole.

    But any asian from india or pakistan who can come here, buy a detatched house with a few nice cars in the drive is far from 'middle class' back in their own country, I'd think.

    Also, due to them countries going through an industrial revolutions right now, the middle classes are only developing really (or only have in the last decade or so).
    How would they be far from middle class in their own country? I don't understand that statement. Most of my Indian friends and I are middle class in both countries. This isn't true for evryone, obviously, but I don't think we're exceptions.

    Also, you say that the middle classes have only developed in those countries over the past decade or are still just developing. This is incorrect. The middle classes in those countries are growing, but has existed for longer than you think. My family (as well as those of my friends) have attended private schools, are university educated, are doctors/judges/academics, own several cars and detached houses, go on holiday regularly and have servants. This has been our lifestyle for many decades... while living in India. How could that not be middle class? Did you think that before 2000, everyone in developing countries just lived in huts and had working class lifestyles or something?
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    My cousin was brought up in a rough area, went to uni, became a dentist and brought a nice semi-detatched home. He doesn't consider himself middle class though because of his upbringing and now and again the working class man comes out of him.
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    (Original post by -starlight-)
    How would they be far from middle class in their own country? I don't understand that statement. Most of my Indian friends and I are middle class in both countries. This isn't true for evryone, obviously, but I don't think we're exceptions.

    Also, you say that the middle classes have only developed in those countries over the past decade or are still just developing. This is incorrect. The middle classes in those countries are growing, but has existed for longer than you think. My family (as well as those of my friends) have attended private schools, are university educated, are doctors/judges/academics, own several cars and detached houses, go on holiday regularly and have servants. This has been our lifestyle for many decades... while living in India. How could that not be middle class? Did you think that before 2000, everyone in developing countries just lived in huts and had working class lifestyles or something?
    No, I would class you as touching on upper class.

    Thats what I meant big gap in between in pakistan/india between poor and rich. Not that there isn't any well off people
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    That's a rediculous question. I totally make sure that people who asked this question are definitely haven't been to Asia. They just watch or read the media mention about asia and asian people. Most of the report are negative news.
    Seeing is believing.:woo:
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    (Original post by T-Reks)
    That is such a dumb question, Class does not concern ehtinicity etc!....you wouldnt call an Asian doctor working class would you?....just for being Asian?...
    i agreeee
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    On either definition of middle-class yes, the two definitions are 1/ dependant upon income, 2/dependent upon education and cultural background. In either case ones ethnicity is not important.
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    I am of Asian origin (Indian) and consider myself to be middle class.
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    Ok to take it further, can an Asian be upper middle class or even upper class?
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    One of my best friends is Indian and she lives in one of the biggest houses in the whole town and her parents drive a 4x4. They are ******* loaded.
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    (Original post by maximusbarr)
    Ok to take it further, can an Asian be upper middle class or even upper class?
    Why would the answers be any different? Everyone is saying that ethnicity is not a factor in determining class, so why would people suddenly change their mind and say 'no, an Asian can't be upper middle class'? :rolleyes:


    Think before you type.
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    (Original post by Pink Bullets)
    Why would the answers be any different? Everyone is saying that ethnicity is not a factor in determining class, so why would people suddenly change their mind and say 'no, an Asian can't be upper middle class'? :rolleyes:


    Think before you type.
    Actually, I don't think you saw what I typed.:rolleyes: I said is it possible for an Asian to be upper class or upper middle class, meaning can an Asian become a social elite without having aristocratic links?
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    (Original post by maximusbarr)
    Actually, I don't think you saw what I typed.:rolleyes: I said is it possible for an Asian to be upper class or upper middle class, meaning can an Asian become a social elite without having aristocratic links?
    I don't think you are understanding what people are saying.

    Almost everyone is saying that ethnicity is not a factor in determining social class. Hence, they would obviously say that yes, an Asian person can be upper or upper middle class.
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    (Original post by maximusbarr)
    Actually, I don't think you saw what I typed.:rolleyes: I said is it possible for an Asian to be upper class or upper middle class, meaning can an Asian become a social elite without having aristocratic links?
    Why can't an Asian be an aristocrat? :rolleyes: There are upper and upper-middle class Asians in Asian countries. Furthermore, if an Asian aristocrat moved to England for whatever reason and continued leading that lifestyle, they aren't suddenly a commoner now, are they? Assuming you live in a Western country, the reason why you don't meet upper and upper middle class Asians often in day to day life is because they have little reason to move here. You don't even have an ounce of intelligence, do you?
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    (Original post by dfjr)


    :rofl:
    IM NAAAAT sure im quite vith you ollld frruityyy
 
 
 
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