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    Hi,

    I was wondering if there was anyone here who is going to try and get on a medicine degree after their first degree or has done this already??

    I am having a bit of a personal career crisis right now and I am regretting not taking medicine at uni because I really wanted to go into either radiology or psychiatry, I just wanted some advice from other people who were potentially in the same position. (By the way I didn't take Chemistry at A level so I can't quit my degree and reapply for medicine)

    How hard is it for graduates to get a place on the 4 year course? How do I prepare and make myself stand out from all the other graduates? Is the 4 year MBChB the right option for someone who is applying after they have graduated from a psychology degree? Where is the easiest place to get into for this course? I am only in 1st year at the moment so I still have a while to make up my mind but I would really appreciate it if someone can give me any advice on this matter. I really thought I knew where I was headed but the more research I have done into the career I chose, the more I really don't want to do it and the more I want to do something more medically related than psychologically related.

    Thanks in advance.
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    See PM.
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    Well after much turmoil, I decided that I'm not really ready for an intensive medicine course right now and I applied to other science courses that I found more interesting so I can have a fun 3/4 years and learn more theoretical science stuff then apply to graduate medicine (whether I'd get in is another matter...)

    I've heard it's notoriously fierce (something like 20 applicants per place :eek3:) so I'm not banking on it really. The best way to get a place is:
    - Get a First in your degree (it's soo competitive that a 2:1 would put you at a disadvantage I reckon)
    - Get as much CARE work experience as possible, anything to show you have an active interest
    - Nail your PS, aptitude tests, and interviews when you do apply

    Not all Med schools have a graduate stream (though you could always do a full 5 year course, but the funding is incredibly crap), obviously the lower they are in rankings the lower the competition is likely to be (I guess).
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    See PM.
    Yeah thanks for the PM, that website is really helpful. I like the look of Warwick, I could nail the entry requirements for that, Nottingham and Swansea, yet Warwick is closest to where I live so would be ideal. It's to start the work experience now! Looking at that website has made me feel a little bit better actually. It's not such an obscure choice as I thought it might be.

    Okay so basically now I just stock up with mucho experience, take all the medically related topics on my course (I already do a medicine elective alongside my psych degree, I love those lectures) and try and get my confidence built on a lot so that I can do the interviews with no trouble. Hmmm.

    I would still like to hear as many opinions and advice as possible, so if anyone has any other experiences I would very much appreciate hearing about them! Thank you, I do feel there is some hope that this could happen now.
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    Another question... How is the 4 year graduate course funded? Do the NHS pay? Do I pay?? I know student finance don't pay, I have read that somewhere...
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    (Original post by HaNzY)
    Another question... How is the 4 year graduate course funded? Do the NHS pay? Do I pay?? I know student finance don't pay, I have read that somewhere...
    NHS pays for the final three years. The tuition fee of the first year is generally split across the degree to make it easier.

    NHS bursary is income-assessed. Maintenance loan from the SLC is also possible.

    Career development loans are also available from the highstreet banks.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    NHS pays for the final three years. The tuition fee of the first year is generally split across the degree to make it easier.

    NHS bursary is income-assessed. Maintenance loan from the SLC is also possible.

    Career development loans are also available from the highstreet banks.
    Well I am getting the full grant income assessed from SLC atm so does that mean I will probably be eligible for NHS bursary? I will probably have some money left over from this degree to pay for the first year, I just need to not shop for 3 years and get a decent summer job.

    Are you realistically hoping you will get in first time or is it not realistic to think that?

    Do they prefer paid work experience or is voluntary work good enough? Will you be at a disadvantage with just voluntary and unpaid stuff?
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    (Original post by HaNzY)
    Well I am getting the full grant income assessed from SLC atm so does that mean I will probably be eligible for NHS bursary? I will probably have some money left over from this degree to pay for the first year, I just need to not shop for 3 years and get a decent summer job.

    Are you realistically hoping you will get in first time or is it not realistic to think that?

    Do they prefer paid work experience or is voluntary work good enough? Will you be at a disadvantage with just voluntary and unpaid stuff?
    I couldn't say about the NHS bursary. I don't know too much about it. A bit of googling will tell you, though.

    Paid work experience, i.e. HCA, is recommended. As a graduate applicant, you're expected to have more experience than the normal college leavers. It is possible to gain a place without paid experience.

    I would like to get in first time, as most applicants would. However I am being realistic and have back-up plans which would, if I fail year after year, provide me with an alternative career.

    May I ask, why are you considering abandoning the clinicol psychologost route?
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    I couldn't say about the NHS bursary. I don't know too much about it. A bit of googling will tell you, though.

    Paid work experience, i.e. HCA, is recommended. As a graduate applicant, you're expected to have more experience than the normal college leavers. It is possible to gain a place without paid experience.

    I would like to get in first time, as most applicants would. However I am being realistic and have back-up plans which would, if I fail year after year, provide me with an alternative career.

    May I ask, why are you considering abandoning the clinicol psychologost route?
    Ahh okay. I guess it's also best to chat to someone at my uni about this whole thing isn't it.

    What is your back up by the way?

    I don't know, the more I do of my medicine elective and how scientific and juicy it is and then I go to psych lectures and it's watered down and all "stats without maths" etc etc and the more I read into clinkul, the more it doesn't appeal to me. It's all too watered down and not medical and sciencey enough for me. There is also a LOT of research to be done in psych and I would much prefer being in a clinical setting (yes I know that is meant to be the nature of what a clinkul psych does) but I dunno, I love neuroscience, brain anatomy and the like and this is why it is all seeming to be too watered down. I think it has been that I keep reading snippets of stuff that clinkuls do, that I don't want to be doing all the time. I don't want to be sitting there psychometrically testing people and then having to refer them onto a psychiatrist who can then prescribe drugs. I just feel that being a clinkul psych, I would feel limited all the while in what I was qualified to do when really all along I really wanted to go the medical route! I feel I may really regret it if I don't attempt medicine now. My reasons probably sound lame but it's just been little things I have seen or heard over the past 2 months or so that have started to put me off and then being patronised in stats classes isn't helping the situation. To be honest it didn't appeal to me completely in the first place but I wanted to use my degree or I will feel it was pointless, so then clinkul grew on me quite a lot and now it's just not.

    I have always enjoyed biology, I regretted not taking it at A level, and I'm constantly getting stuck into my bf's medicine work (I was helping him with some histology stuff the other day which was sooooo interesting! And then I looked at my stuff about Cannon and Bard, and James and Langes theories of emotion and I felt ) I don't want to do med because he is doing it btw, I thought I did before but when he shows me the stuff he is doing now he's on the course, I am positively sure that it is my own interest. I love all the biological psych modules and cognitive was pretty good last semester but it's all watered down this semester. And I am not looking forward to social and developmental next year. So you can see where my interests lie really.

    Sorry if that was an essay, I probably need to make a list of my pros and cons for the different routes so I can organise my thoughts about this sudden 180 degree flip in career choice.
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    best you can do for yourself at the moment is; do well in all your uni exams/essays and get some care experiance (voluntary or unpaid).

    doing well at uni (ie getting a 2:1 or above) will help your medical application and give you good options if you decide against medicine.

    getting some care experiance will give you a good idea as to weather you would like medicine or weather you just like the idea of it. paid HCA work is hard to get on a part time basis but it is worth going into the jobe center (or online) and looking for positions in care homes. the nhs jobs site also advertises jobs in your local hospital but you usually need quite a bit of previous care experiance or nvq 2 in health and social care to apply (but still worth a shot). if not apply for a few hours of voluntary work a week at a hospis or hospital.

    good luck.
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    I would echo everything that's been said, and would seriously recommend you get some hospital-based work experience, because the reality of what doctors actually do is quite different to what you might see only from looking at the stuff you study on the course.

    At least your first degree will probably come in mighty helpful though I would have thought, since it will give you a head start in the psych elements of the course.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    NHS pays for the final three years. The tuition fee of the first year is generally split across the degree to make it easier.

    NHS bursary is income-assessed. Maintenance loan from the SLC is also possible.

    Career development loans are also available from the highstreet banks.
    Does your first degree have to be in a related subject? i.e. biology, chemistry, etc.
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    (Original post by Don John)
    Does your first degree have to be in a related subject? i.e. biology, chemistry, etc.

    That depends on the university as far as admissions policies are concerned. I'm not sure for the funding part of things but I doubt it would play much of a role so long as you hold a recognised offer for a graduate-entry medicine course.

    Come do it, it's fun
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    (Original post by graemematt)
    That depends on the university as far as admissions policies are concerned. I'm not sure for the funding part of things but I doubt it would play much of a role so long as you hold a recognised offer for a graduate-entry medicine course.

    Come do it, it's fun
    Ooooo Warwick! That's the one I would like to get into if I decided I do want to go down this route. What is Warwick like? Is it a decent course? How is it assessed? etc etc
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    (Original post by graemematt)
    That depends on the university as far as admissions policies are concerned. I'm not sure for the funding part of things but I doubt it would play much of a role so long as you hold a recognised offer for a graduate-entry medicine course.

    Come do it, it's fun
    Sorry to hijack the thread op

    Graemematt have you any idea what road the Medical Teaching centre is on or a post code for it trying to plan my route for monday??

    Rep for anyone that can answer the above
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    (Original post by HaNzY)
    Ooooo Warwick! That's the one I would like to get into if I decided I do want to go down this route. What is Warwick like? Is it a decent course? How is it assessed? etc etc
    Haha, I hope you do come here, it's good fun Right, let's see...

    Warwick's a nice place generally. As you may or may not know the uni is campus-based, which has pros and cons obviously. It's fairly leafy and pleasent, but there isnt a great deal here to do. Enough to satisfy the masses, but lacking in some areas like nights out or sports facilities (which is odd as the university has LOADS of sports clubs...)

    The medical school...well, it's good in some ways and bad in others. I'd say what I personally like about it is the way you learn different modules during different semesters that seem to tie in well together, thus giving you an integrated feel to the course. Plus there is early clinical contact (from Semester 2 you're taking patient histories). The bad things are...well for one the assessment method seems very, very strange. It's based on passing a number of SAQs worth 20 marks each, of which you must pass 14 of each 20-mark question or more. So in theory you could get 70% and fail, but another candidate could get 55% and pass. It's confusing, but fortunately I managed to get through it. On that note, the course is VERY intense! You'll be working 9-5 in Semester 2 every day (infact, 8-5 on some days) and Semester 3 you'll have some evening classes on top.

    I enjoy the course personally, and I'm lucky to be starting clinicals on Monday :-O So can't wait to start!

    Any more questions, fire away
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    (Original post by brokenangel)
    Sorry to hijack the thread op

    Graemematt have you any idea what road the Medical Teaching centre is on or a post code for it trying to plan my route for monday??

    Rep for anyone that can answer the above
    Right...I cant actually remember the name of the road to the MTC! Let's see if I can find it somewhere. Type in Gibbet Hill Road into your sat-nav and you'll get there. Basically as you drive along Kenilworth Rd (A45) you'll see signs for the university off warwick. Take a right if you're coming from Coventry, and then the medical school is on your right a little way down (again it's sign-posted).

    It isnt that hard to find. It's in the south-west of Coventry anyway, past Earlsdon towards Kenilworth. The uni will have good directions!

    Enjoy the open day, I'm sure it'll be very insightful. Not sure who's speaking to you, but I'm fairly sure Prof Abrahams will be showing off his anatomy teaching and plastinates. It is impressive to be fair Anywho let me know how you found it!
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    (Original post by graemematt)
    Haha, I hope you do come here, it's good fun Right, let's see...

    Warwick's a nice place generally. As you may or may not know the uni is campus-based, which has pros and cons obviously. It's fairly leafy and pleasent, but there isnt a great deal here to do. Enough to satisfy the masses, but lacking in some areas like nights out or sports facilities (which is odd as the university has LOADS of sports clubs...)

    The medical school...well, it's good in some ways and bad in others. I'd say what I personally like about it is the way you learn different modules during different semesters that seem to tie in well together, thus giving you an integrated feel to the course. Plus there is early clinical contact (from Semester 2 you're taking patient histories). The bad things are...well for one the assessment method seems very, very strange. It's based on passing a number of SAQs worth 20 marks each, of which you must pass 14 of each 20-mark question or more. So in theory you could get 70% and fail, but another candidate could get 55% and pass. It's confusing, but fortunately I managed to get through it. On that note, the course is VERY intense! You'll be working 9-5 in Semester 2 every day (infact, 8-5 on some days) and Semester 3 you'll have some evening classes on top.

    I enjoy the course personally, and I'm lucky to be starting clinicals on Monday :-O So can't wait to start!

    Any more questions, fire away
    Haha that sounds strange! So you have a third taught semester in the year?

    Do you mean it is intense because of the amount of contact hours or intense at how hard the work is and the quantity of work is high etc?

    It would be ideal for me to live at home (in Dudley, the opposite side of Birmingham from Warwick) and it would take me longer than an hour to commute. Do you reckon this would be worth it due to the nature of the degree or will I kill myself doing that? I don't know how I would afford accommodation though. No part time job will give me enough money for that.

    What was the application process like and the "selection centre"? That's something I have no idea about at the moment, the interview process. What did you do/have to make you stand out from all other graduates trying to get in there? Is there anything they are specifically looking for at Warwick? e.g. what do I have to do at the interview to give me a good chance? Be confident? Try and come up with solutions to all problems? Be the "natural leader" in the group interview thing?

    It's all well and good me going and getting this work exp but if I can't pass the interview I'm screwed lol.

    It sounds really interesting though!!

    Does the university have a gym?
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    (Original post by HaNzY)
    Haha that sounds strange! So you have a third taught semester in the year?

    Do you mean it is intense because of the amount of contact hours or intense at how hard the work is and the quantity of work is high etc?

    It would be ideal for me to live at home (in Dudley, the opposite side of Birmingham from Warwick) and it would take me longer than an hour to commute. Do you reckon this would be worth it due to the nature of the degree or will I kill myself doing that? I don't know how I would afford accommodation though. No part time job will give me enough money for that.

    What was the application process like and the "selection centre"? That's something I have no idea about at the moment, the interview process. What did you do/have to make you stand out from all other graduates trying to get in there? Is there anything they are specifically looking for at Warwick? e.g. what do I have to do at the interview to give me a good chance? Be confident? Try and come up with solutions to all problems? Be the "natural leader" in the group interview thing?

    It's all well and good me going and getting this work exp but if I can't pass the interview I'm screwed lol.

    It sounds really interesting though!!

    Does the university have a gym?
    Sorry, should've explained myself better There's 3 semesters stretched over a year and a half, so each is half a year long (or thereabouts). And we have a summer project to do after the first year (which involves writing up some patient cases and a 10000 word essay or thereabouts).

    As for living at home...well, it would be quite a trek. It depends how much time you're willing to dedicate to the degree really! First semester is the lightest in terms of workload and so you could always try living from home and see how it's going. Failing that I would recommend living in university accommodation, purely for social reasons

    The course is intense in terms of workload. Remember that there are about 180 of you, all with a minimum of 2.1 degree qualifications, and not everyone will get through. Furthermore, we cover everything in 16 months that undergrad students cover in a minimum of 2 years, sometimes 3...so it can get quite overwhelming! Studying in the evenings is fairly mandatory for most nights.

    For the interview! Ah yes. Well, you just have to be yourself. In the group interview, you could try to be the leader, as that does have a nature of working, but if you encounter someone else trying to do the same thing, you could get into some trouble! I think your best bet is to remain level-headed, ask how everyone is doing and remember to try and include everyone in the task. That way you seem like a good team player!

    There is a gym and it's rather good! Living on campus, it was about 30 seconds from my house so I got quite a lot of use out of it
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    (Original post by graemematt)
    Sorry, should've explained myself better There's 3 semesters stretched over a year and a half, so each is half a year long (or thereabouts). And we have a summer project to do after the first year (which involves writing up some patient cases and a 10000 word essay or thereabouts).

    As for living at home...well, it would be quite a trek. It depends how much time you're willing to dedicate to the degree really! First semester is the lightest in terms of workload and so you could always try living from home and see how it's going. Failing that I would recommend living in university accommodation, purely for social reasons

    The course is intense in terms of workload. Remember that there are about 180 of you, all with a minimum of 2.1 degree qualifications, and not everyone will get through. Furthermore, we cover everything in 16 months that undergrad students cover in a minimum of 2 years, sometimes 3...so it can get quite overwhelming! Studying in the evenings is fairly mandatory for most nights.

    For the interview! Ah yes. Well, you just have to be yourself. In the group interview, you could try to be the leader, as that does have a nature of working, but if you encounter someone else trying to do the same thing, you could get into some trouble! I think your best bet is to remain level-headed, ask how everyone is doing and remember to try and include everyone in the task. That way you seem like a good team player!

    There is a gym and it's rather good! Living on campus, it was about 30 seconds from my house so I got quite a lot of use out of it
    Is the workload mainly assessed stuff or is it just extra reading around the subject so you know the stuff that they don't go into in much detail?
    Because my bf who does medicine has had 7 times less assessed work to do as I have (he does medicine) but he has a LOT of extra reading and prep for different things the next day. Is that the way it is for you?

    Yeah I live at home now and I miss out on everything social. It does suck, but its cheaper. I would have to do the journey to Warwick a few times before deciding about where I would live. It sounds really exciting though! Expect more questions off me as and when they come up and nearer to the time of applying haha! Thank you so much
 
 
 
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