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    (Original post by HaNzY)
    Accept the biomed course but still apply to medicine next year and keep trying until you get on. Because at least you are doing something constructive with your time while you are waiting to get into medicine.
    ?
    Is it possible that this year i do my 3 alevels-chem,bio,maths and go to the biomed course and while at imperial i apply for medicine. and then drop out of the biomed course if i get accepted?
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    I've heard that medical schools will not look at your application if you're enrolled on another degree course (unless you're about to graduate, of course).
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    (Original post by persian2845)
    I just heard that from you...
    But honestly i have worked soo hard for the past few years, i want to go to a good university...
    newcastle is higher on the league table for bio med than imperial. but if you just want the name then that is up to you.
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    If you want to go to med school (or pass your psych degree) I'd learn to spell clinical. It comes up a lot.
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    (Original post by persian2845)
    Is it possible that this year i do my 3 alevels-chem,bio,maths and go to the biomed course and while at imperial i apply for medicine. and then drop out of the biomed course if i get accepted?
    Most uni's dislike applicant already on a course, and some people will reject you straight out. Also you have to consider the financial burden of funding an extra year at uni on TOP of the 5/6 year medical degree. If you want to do this you'd be better off taking a gap year and getting a job or some experience.

    Also you are supposed to show you did something constructive in your gap year, how will you show that if you are studying for a year of a degree which will have no purpose? Everyone else will have work experience and jobs and volunteering abroad and you will have "I went to lots of lectures..."
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    (Original post by icantthinkofacoolusername)
    If you want to go to med school (or pass your psych degree) I'd learn to spell clinical. It comes up a lot.
    I think the "clinikul/clinicol" was a reference to an inside joke over on the Psych forums. I assume that the OP is actually capable of spelling clinical.
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    (Original post by krisblade)
    Most uni's dislike applicant already on a course, and some people will reject you straight out. Also you have to consider the financial burden of funding an extra year at uni on TOP of the 5/6 year medical degree. If you want to do this you'd be better off taking a gap year and getting a job or some experience.

    Also you are supposed to show you did something constructive in your gap year, how will you show that if you are studying for a year of a degree which will have no purpose? Everyone else will have work experience and jobs and volunteering abroad and you will have "I went to lots of lectures..."
    Thx for the nice remark but i already have some work experience and i have 3-4 months of summer to do some more work... i only reason i didnt get in this year was that the unis i applied to wanted alevels only for medicine....im just not too keen with a gap year...
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    (Original post by ballerinabetty)
    newcastle is higher on the league table for bio med than imperial. but if you just want the name then that is up to you.
    Well i looked at the entry requirements and it seems that imperial is way harder to get into- so it must be better (ABB compared to AAA + BMAT) and also at imperial, the biomed course is a part of the faculty of medicine....but yeah we dont have the same amount of info. as uk students when it comes to the choices...so we end up going for names..
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    (Original post by persian2845)
    Thx for the nice remark but i already have some work experience and i have 3-4 months of summer to do some more work... i only reason i didnt get in this year was that the unis i applied to wanted alevels only for medicine....im just not too keen with a gap year...
    Whilst you might have a lot, my point is those who have had a gap year are expected to have more simply because you have a whole extra year, compared with those who've had to fit around school/college. I'm not saying thats why you didn't get in! It's just nearly everyone I've met who took a gap year worked for a health charity for a year, or worked with medics in africa or had a job as a HCA. That gives them a lot to talk about. The med school isnt going to be happy taking you on as a drop out as it is, so you can't talk about the degree you are dropping as something constructive for the last year. It's a massive risk which means many unis wont want to take you on, it will cost you a lot, and would put you at a huge disadvantage against those who had a constructive gap year.

    I don't see why people see taking a degree and dropping out for medicine as a good idea. Really you should either apply post grad with a degree or take a gap year. The only person I know who did this got rejections, whereas I think she would have had a chance if she'd just gone for it and taken a gap year.
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    (Original post by icantthinkofacoolusername)
    If you want to go to med school (or pass your psych degree) I'd learn to spell clinical. It comes up a lot.
    LOL are you talking about clinkul?? haha! that's a running joke, just ask GodspeedGehenna about clinkul psycologosts!!

    I know it is spelled clinical, christ. Saying the whole clinkul thing is for GodspeedGehenna's benefit lol. Those who want to be clinical psychologists call it that, but those who wanted to be clinical psychologists but have now seen why they really should not go down that route should call it clinkul psycologosts according to GG, I have just followed. Also because literally every psychology undergraduate wants to be a clinkul at some point and most of them are not even half serious about it and have no idea how hard it is to get into and what sort of commitment they need to have to the whole thing. So yeah, those are the reasons behind it, so please don't tell me to learn a word I already know how to spell, thank you.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    I think the "clinikul/clinicol" was a reference to an inside joke over on the Psych forums. I assume that the OP is actually capable of spelling clinical.
    EXACTLY GG!!!!!! It's your influence that I now call it clinkul though :p:
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    (Original post by krisblade)
    Whilst you might have a lot, my point is those who have had a gap year are expected to have more simply because you have a whole extra year, compared with those who've had to fit around school/college. I'm not saying thats why you didn't get in! It's just nearly everyone I've met who took a gap year worked for a health charity for a year, or worked with medics in africa or had a job as a HCA. That gives them a lot to talk about. The med school isnt going to be happy taking you on as a drop out as it is, so you can't talk about the degree you are dropping as something constructive for the last year. It's a massive risk which means many unis wont want to take you on, it will cost you a lot, and would put you at a huge disadvantage against those who had a constructive gap year.

    I don't see why people see taking a degree and dropping out for medicine as a good idea. Really you should either apply post grad with a degree or take a gap year. The only person I know who did this got rejections, whereas I think she would have had a chance if she'd just gone for it and taken a gap year.
    Alright thanks for the suggestions...will definitely give more thoughts to it
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    (Original post by persian2845)
    Well i looked at the entry requirements and it seems that imperial is way harder to get into- so it must be better (ABB compared to AAA + BMAT) and also at imperial, the biomed course is a part of the faculty of medicine....but yeah we dont have the same amount of info. as uk students when it comes to the choices...so we end up going for names..
    oh dont get me wrong imperial is a very well renowned uni in the uk. however for what you want somewhere like newcastle would be better just because of the medicine transfer option after first year. newcastle biomed is also done along side the newcastle med students so it is very relivant to the medicine course there.


    one piece of advice i would give though is that just because the uni is harder to get into/ has higher entry requierments it does not always mean that it is better. top unis for biomed in the uk are: aston (birmingham), cardiff and newcastle and all thier entry requierments are quite low (aston's is only BBB) but that is because they have more spaces on the course compared to places like imperial.
    like i said imperial is a very good uni and the name will do alot for your cv but just because of your goals i would suggest other places.
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    (Original post by ballerinabetty)
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
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    (Original post by graemematt)
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    What do all you guys think about if I did a Phlebotomy training course and then trying to find a job it in (before I start trying to apply to medicine of course). Will that be of any use? Or will I be wasting £293 ??? Opinions please I was just thinking that it might make me look more committed because i have gone out my way to train for that, or would it be best just applying to healthcare assistant and support worker jobs? (Which there are hardly any I can apply to because they all want NVQ2 in care) Thanks
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    (Original post by HaNzY)
    What do all you guys think about if I did a Phlebotomy training course and then trying to find a job it in (before I start trying to apply to medicine of course). Will that be of any use? Or will I be wasting £293 ??? Opinions please I was just thinking that it might make me look more committed because i have gone out my way to train for that, or would it be best just applying to healthcare assistant and support worker jobs? (Which there are hardly any I can apply to because they all want NVQ2 in care) Thanks
    From what I understand, those courses wont actually qualify you to practice as a Phleb. You need to do on-the-job training, and trainee phleb jobs arn't that common.

    You're more likely to find a HCA/SW job that will train you up to NVQ2.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    From what I understand, those courses wont actually qualify you to practice as a Phleb. You need to do on-the-job training, and trainee phleb jobs arn't that common.

    You're more likely to find a HCA/SW job that will train you up to NVQ2.
    Yeah i did find a phleb post but I can't do the amount of hours they want so I can't really apply for it.

    Yeah I guess I should just continue to search for HCA or SW post. It's so hard to find ANYTHING, especially in my area. Everything seems to be atleast half an hour down the motorway away. There are so many hospices and hospitals in my area as well grrr.
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    (Original post by HaNzY)
    What do all you guys think about if I did a Phlebotomy training course and then trying to find a job it in (before I start trying to apply to medicine of course). Will that be of any use? Or will I be wasting £293 ??? Opinions please I was just thinking that it might make me look more committed because i have gone out my way to train for that, or would it be best just applying to healthcare assistant and support worker jobs? (Which there are hardly any I can apply to because they all want NVQ2 in care) Thanks
    DO NOT pay for those courses, they dont actually make you a phleb. I'm a fully trained phleb and they trained me on the job for nothing during the holidays. Your best bet is to go on NHS bank staff, thats what I did and now I work my holidays. I get paid 7.70 an hour, not paying someone else!!!
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    I have decided I am going to get some voluntary experience in my local hospital to start with, I am never going to get one of these jobs because I don't have much care experience And while I am at it I am going to apply for another work experience placement in the local hospital
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    (Original post by krisblade)
    DO NOT pay for those courses, they dont actually make you a phleb. I'm a fully trained phleb and they trained me on the job for nothing during the holidays. Your best bet is to go on NHS bank staff, thats what I did and now I work my holidays. I get paid 7.70 an hour, not paying someone else!!!
    How exactly did you get into it then? What experience did you have prior to getting on the NHS bank staff?
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    (Original post by HaNzY)
    How exactly did you get into it then? What experience did you have prior to getting on the NHS bank staff?
    I had never had a paid job before. I volunteered three hours a week on a ward talking to patients, that was all my "caring experience" so really nothing. It was the same hospital I'd done two work experiences in, volunteered in and been a patient in so I knew some of the staff. A nurse I volunteered with suggested seeing if I could do phlebotomy and that if I worked on bank staff I could work just during the holidays. There was another med student who apparently did that. So I just went and asked. Had to go through all the handing in ID, getting a CRB, passing occy health etc. which took a month or so and then I started a month or so later.

    There isn't really any official training. When I started two other ex-HCA's in their 40/50's started but I seemed to be doing stuff way earlier than them. For example one didn't even bleed anyone for three weeks, and did it within a day of starting, and was working alone on the wards within a week or two, whereas the others it took a month or more. I don't know if its cause I caught the hang of it really easily, or they expected me to be better or something because I was starting med school =/ I'd say its a really helpful experience. The only way to get good at it is to do it over and over!

    EDIT: And I mentioned it on my PS that I was starting when I turned 18 as I had the job (which was mostly true as I was really only waiting for my CRB which would be fine and to turn 18...) and it came up in my interview and they asked me about it. I'd bled some of the staff before for practice, and I'd already learnt the bottles and how to use the equipment vaguely from my mum so I could say a bit about it.
 
 
 
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