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Multiculturalism is a load of tosh - my experience Watch

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    A couple of years ago, I worked at the AA call centre between finishing A-levels and starting university (I'm 20 now). It was a fairly easy job, and paid £7 an hour for nearly 40 hours a week, and there was the chance to do work like 'Rapid Response' where you came in at their beckon call and got paid £27 an hour. Fair enough, I thought, and just worked there as a way to save money for uni (it saved me about £2,000 over 12 weeks).

    The problem was that, during my training, I was literally the only white girl in a group of 20 people (even the trainers were Asian). I wasn't bothered about that particularly at first, but it was obvious that the other people picked up on it, and kept making cultural references that they knew I wouldn't get. They kept making me feel like an uncultured 'aggora' or whatever they call white people, and doing things like all gathering round a computer to watch Youtube clips in Punjabi and laughing hysterically while I was sitting there like a numpty.

    They really fit the bill of stereotypical Asians, like making fun of one guy because he was studying Psychology and they thought it was a joke subject. Furthermore, all they seemed to talk about was their 'wealthy' friends and cars they'd just bought etc. I just felt like saying, 'if you're that sodding wealthy, what are you doing answering the phone here?'

    The funny thing is though, the AA wanted to have only UK call centres because of peoples' past experiences phoning places like bloody Bombay, but half of these Asians had such strong accents that it defeated the purpose. I loved it when customers commented to me that it was 'so nice to speak to an English person'.

    It was fine when my job started properly, because there were more white, friendly people on the call centre floor and I had a right laugh, but my 3 weeks of training were just horrible. Proof that multiculturalism is a load of tosh.
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    Generally people who come here from abroad take whatever job they can get, and normally British people don't want to spend hours on end stuck in a call centre.

    And for the record, what you felt working in that call centre is no different to how the majority of marginalised people in Britain feel. Welcome to the real world.
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    (Original post by sunpro)
    A couple of years ago, I worked at the AA call centre between finishing A-levels and starting university (I'm 20 now). It was a fairly easy job, and paid £7 an hour for nearly 40 hours a week, and there was the chance to do work like 'Rapid Response' where you came in at their beckon call and got paid £27 an hour. Fair enough, I thought, and just worked there as a way to save money for uni (it saved me about £2,000 over 12 weeks).

    The problem was that, during my training, I was literally the only white girl in a group of 20 people (even the trainers were Asian). I wasn't bothered about that particularly at first, but it was obvious that the other people picked up on it, and kept making cultural references that they knew I wouldn't get. They kept making me feel like an uncultured 'aggora' or whatever they call white people, and doing things like all gathering round a computer to watch Youtube clips in Punjabi and laughing hysterically while I was sitting there like a numpty.

    They really fit the bill of stereotypical Asians, like making fun of one guy because he was studying Psychology and they thought it was a joke subject. Furthermore, all they seemed to talk about was their 'wealthy' friends and cars they'd just bought etc. I just felt like saying, 'if you're that sodding wealthy, what are you doing answering the phone here?'

    The funny thing is though, the AA wanted to have only UK call centres because of peoples' past experiences phoning places like bloody Bombay, but half of these Asians had such strong accents that it defeated the purpose. I loved it when customers commented to me that it was 'so nice to speak to an English person'.

    It was fine when my job started properly, because there were more white, friendly people on the call centre floor and I had a right laugh, but my 3 weeks of training were just horrible. Proof that multiculturalism is a load of tosh.
    I think your story is intresting, but you shouldn't blame them for taking the job and sometimes it's annoying not to understand what they're saying i agree with you, nevertheless they respect you and probably never make fun of you.
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    (Original post by marcusmerehay)
    Generally people who come here from abroad take whatever job they can get, and normally British people don't want to spend hours on end stuck in a call centre.

    And for the record, what you felt working in that call centre is no different to how the majority of marginalised people in Britain feel. Welcome to the real world.
    I'm an indigenous Brit though. Why should I be made to feel like that by immigrants from developing countries?
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    So let me get this straight... you base your views on multiculturalism (and Asians) on what you experienced in AA call centre training sessions.... :confused:

    Note to OP: The reason why 'immigrants' are getting these jobs is because the 'indigenous' white population do not generally want these jobs. So stop complaining.

    P.S. You're right about Asians making fun of people who take so-called 'joke' subjects... I would know because of my own personal experience
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    (Original post by sunpro)
    I'm an indigenous Brit though. Why should I be made to feel like that by immigrants from developing countries?
    This is exactly representative of the problems these people feel while trying to integrate.

    How do you know they were immigrants? They may well have been born here like yourself. Just because you don't share the same interests doesn't mean you have to hold it against them.
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    (Original post by marcusmerehay)
    This is exactly representative of the problems these people feel while trying to integrate.

    How do you know they were immigrants? They may well have been born here like yourself. Just because you don't share the same interests doesn't mean you have to hold it against them.


    exactly, say the shoe was on the other foot and it was the OP with a load of 'indigenous britons' working along side one immigant worker, would they then make sure that all their conversations were in simple english and otherwise easily understood by the migrant worker, so that he/she could feel included?
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    (Original post by Barden)
    exactly, say the shoe was on the other foot and it was the OP with a load of 'indigenous britons' working along side one immigant worker, would they then make sure that all their conversations were in simple english and otherwise easily understood by the migrant worker, so that he/she could feel included?
    Why should I be made to feel like a foreigner in my own country? It's this kind of attitude that is sending England down the crapper.
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    Change your facebook status. :p:
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    (Original post by sunpro)
    Why should I be made to feel like a foreigner in my own country? It's this kind of attitude that is sending England down the crapper.
    Let me guess bnp?
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    (Original post by jonjon123)
    Let me guess bnp?
    No actually. I love England far too much to vote BNP.

    But let me guess, you've never experienced anything vaguely like what I did?
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    Those are the exactly the type of Asians I dislike.
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    (Original post by Barden)
    exactly, say the shoe was on the other foot and it was the OP with a load of 'indigenous britons' working along side one immigant worker, would they then make sure that all their conversations were in simple english and otherwise easily understood by the migrant worker, so that he/she could feel included?
    The migrant worker should be able to speak fluent English - he is in England after all.
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    (Original post by sunpro)
    I loved it when customers commented to me that it was 'so nice to speak to an English person'.
    They'd say the same to me.
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    (Original post by sunpro)
    No actually. I love England far too much to vote BNP.

    But let me guess, you've never experienced anything vaguely like what I did?
    Ok can I just ask you where you worked. This is becuase I wouldn't make a claim pakistani's are taking my job, while I am living in bradford or africans took my job in haringey.
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    (Original post by sunpro)
    Why should I be made to feel like a foreigner in my own country? It's this kind of attitude that is sending England down the crapper.
    You weren't necessarily made to feel like a foreigner, just an outcast - it happens everywhere, to everyone, regardless of their ethnicity.
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    Firstly, circumstantial evidence =/= evidence.

    (Original post by sunpro)
    But let me guess, you've never experienced anything vaguely like what I did?
    Secondly, I've worked in a call centre that was majority Asian, and you know what, it was fine. I joined in their conversations and didn't let the fact that they happened to be of Asian origin get in the way of our relationship. Instead of isolating myself, or deciding that they were 'your stereotypical Asian', I tried to include myself - and y'know what, it worked, and they had respect for me.

    Multiculturalism is as much take as it is give. If they isolate themselves and you isolate yourself, nobody is trying to integrate. I'd hazard a guess that they thought that you were a 'typical stuck-up Brit', too.

    (as a side note, it's 'beck and call', not 'beckon call')
    (and as a second side note, I couldn't care less where the call centre is, so long as I can understand the person on the phone. People's hatred of 'foreign' call centres baffles me, especially as I can sometimes have as much luck speaking to somebody with a thick Glaswegian accent as I can somebody with a thick Indian accent)
    (as my final side point, somebody I worked with used to get abuse hurled at him - he was second generation British, but he had an Indian name and a slight accent through growing up in his family, but everybody assumed he was 'one of those foreigners')
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    (Original post by electriic_ink)
    The migrant worker should be able to speak fluent English - he is in England after all.
    What type of English, though? Somebody I worked with in Asda spoke fluent QE, but regularly got abuse from people in York for not being able to understand 'English'. I struggle to understand Yorkshire English sometimes!
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    (Original post by Doodahdoo)
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    You tell them sister lol.

    +1 for you
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    (Original post by SomeStudent)
    You weren't necessarily made to feel like a foreigner, just an outcast - it happens everywhere, to everyone, regardless of their ethnicity.
    :yes: Its true...

    lol sorry i can't stop laughing at your sig :rofl:
 
 
 
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