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    this maybe in the wrong section so please move acordingly.

    how would i go about applying for a position as a trainee clinical physiologist?

    you need to be a trainee before you can apply for the degree but i dont know how to become a trainee.
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    oo I have never heard of one of them to be honest. What exactly to they do?

    Through google just found:

    Trainee positions are usually advertised on the NHS Jobs website, in local press or jobcentres. Alternatively, information on opportunities may also be available by contacting your local NHS hospital.



    Most clinical physiologists are employed by the NHS. Entry to trainee posts is competitive.

    There are two entry routes for this work:

    Direct entry as a trainee in a hospital department with part-time study for a degree in clinical physiology. Most clinical physiologists enter through this route.
    By studying full time for a clinical physiology degree before entering the work.
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    thanks i have found that too on the nhs web site but i looked on nhs jobs and there is not one post in the enitre country. so i just wanna know if i am missing something and why i cant acctually find anywhere to apply to.

    a clinical physiologist works in medical physics using all the machines there to help doctors diagnose and treat illness. they do things like fit heart monitors and stuff.
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    Swansea, leeds..MMU..anddddd, i think worcester? All offer clinical physiology as a degree, swansea it's 4 years with a sandwhich year. If you want to do that, but have also considered nursing..medicine, i'd avoid it. It's little patient contact, lots of physics and maths and plenty of technology
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    PS Helper
    In the main medicine/healthcare forum there is a thread on cardiac physiology that you might find helpful. Trainee posts don't come up that often so you just have to keep an eye out. If you look on UCAS there are some full time courses but theres only 3 at the moment.
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    Kent also do it
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    Swansea, leeds..MMU..anddddd, i think worcester? All offer clinical physiology as a degree, swansea it's 4 years with a sandwhich year.
    i know what unis do it i was asking about trainee posts. you need a trainee post before you can apply to uni.
    If you want to do that, but have also considered nursing..medicine, i'd avoid it. It's little patient contact, lots of physics and maths and plenty of technology
    i am wanting to be a doctor but i am trying to find a degree i would enjoy doing for 3/4 years if i dont get to do medicine. thats why i consider nursing offen.
    nursing and clinical physiology are accepted by all but 3 med schools so i dont honestly think they will be a problem.
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    (Original post by Happy_Holidays)
    In the main medicine/healthcare forum there is a thread on cardiac physiology that you might find helpful. Trainee posts don't come up that often so you just have to keep an eye out. If you look on UCAS there are some full time courses but theres only 3 at the moment.
    i know manchester met do a full time course but do you know the other two? and thier ucas code

    i saw one full time course that say you had to already have a trainee post... this confused me because i though if you applied for full time you did need to be a trainee? do you know any more about this?

    thanks you
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    Ah, damn it, ignore my post! I read it as Psychologist not Physiologist :o:
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    (Original post by ballerinabetty)
    i know what unis do it i was asking about trainee posts. you need a trainee post before you can apply to uni. i am wanting to be a doctor but i am trying to find a degree i would enjoy doing for 3/4 years if i dont get to do medicine. thats why i consider nursing offen.
    nursing and clinical physiology are accepted by all but 3 med schools so i dont honestly think they will be a problem.

    as someone who spent around 2 months on a clinical physiology degreee..and ended up going back to nursing, do nursing.
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    (Original post by ballerinabetty)
    i know manchester met do a full time course but do you know the other two? and thier ucas code

    i saw one full time course that say you had to already have a trainee post... this confused me because i though if you applied for full time you did need to be a trainee? do you know any more about this?

    thanks you
    Swansea do a full time course and I think Leeds do. On UCAS if you do subject serach they are under cardiac or cardiology (can't remember which).
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    as someone who spent around 2 months on a clinical physiology degreee..and ended up going back to nursing, do nursing.
    only in your opinion.
    physiology appeals to me more because it is more science based than nursing.
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    (Original post by ballerinabetty)
    only in your opinion.
    physiology appeals to me more because it is more science based than nursing.

    problem is it's a job not a course, and it's hardly desirable if you want to end up in medicine, as it's a long 4 years and hardly that much science in it, mostly physics
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    As a former trainee respiratory physiologist for 2 years (yes yes, I've been around a lot lol) the full-time degrees are not recognised for clinical physiologists (note I am not referring to clinical scientists or physics posts) as full qualifying for the following reasons:
    -they don't include the 4 years of trainee experience based in a hospital carrying out the test as an employee (not as a student placement)
    -the don't include the Part 1 and Part 2 exams carried out in years 2 and 4 which are required by each professional body (respiratory, cardiology, neuro, and gastro) to certify them to carry out the specific physiological tests in their fields

    Now these full time degrees may have somehow incorporated the part exams into this, however I am not aware of this since leaving my post 2.5 years ago.

    For those looking to apply for the trainee post, all posts start in september/october of each year as the block release BSc Honours degree also starts during this time (usually study 1 block release week per month at uni). So normally the earliest you will see posts advertised is july of each year onwards
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    problem is it's a job not a course, and it's hardly desirable if you want to end up in medicine, as it's a long 4 years and hardly that much science in it, mostly physics
    Actually it includes applied sciences of various types such as physics, pharmacology (we sometimes have to administer test substances and medications as part of testing), physiology, anatomy, biochem, clinical practice, even psychology (don't ask me why! lol).

    But we were used to having even our collegues in the dark about what we actually got up to
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    There's a cardiac physiologist graduate in Barts now doing medicine, in his fourth year.
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    (Original post by Subcutaneous)
    problem is it's a job not a course, and it's hardly desirable if you want to end up in medicine, as it's a long 4 years and hardly that much science in it, mostly physics
    Since when was physics not a science?
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    (Original post by ballerinabetty)
    this maybe in the wrong section so please move acordingly.

    how would i go about applying for a position as a trainee clinical physiologist?

    you need to be a trainee before you can apply for the degree but i dont know how to become a trainee.
    Don't know where you're located, but there is an open day for the Trainee Clinical Physiology/Technology training scheme at Wolverhampton University on 5th May 2010, for the scheme where you get paid a salary and they pay for you to go to uni and get your degree (like i'm doing )
    If you want any more information, just quote or pm me!
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    I am replying to update the information I provided in a previous post- from reading around it appears that some of the full-time courses may offer the RCCP registrations and professional exams however I am not fully sure about this, and would still recommend the 4 year block release training route, if only for the financial security and greater exposure to clinical training.
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    (Original post by mackers_ire)
    As a former trainee respiratory physiologist for 2 years (yes yes, I've been around a lot lol) the full-time degrees are not recognised for clinical physiologists (note I am not referring to clinical scientists or physics posts) as full qualifying for the following reasons:
    -they don't include the 4 years of trainee experience based in a hospital carrying out the test as an employee (not as a student placement)
    -the don't include the Part 1 and Part 2 exams carried out in years 2 and 4 which are required by each professional body (respiratory, cardiology, neuro, and gastro) to certify them to carry out the specific physiological tests in their fields

    Now these full time degrees may have somehow incorporated the part exams into this, however I am not aware of this since leaving my post 2.5 years ago.

    For those looking to apply for the trainee post, all posts start in september/october of each year as the block release BSc Honours degree also starts during this time (usually study 1 block release week per month at uni). So normally the earliest you will see posts advertised is july of each year onwards
    Hey
    I'm a bit confused and was wondering if you would clarify something for me ... I came a job post : Trainee clinical physiologist (In Neurophysiology); is this a totally different post to the clinical scientist clinical physiology in neurophysiology, if so how?
    I'm so confused
 
 
 
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