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    Im doing open uni at the moment, but i will be applying for entrance to a 'proper' university in the future.

    does anybody know of one which has good support for aspergers? or one where people with aspergers are well accepted (socially)?

    all of the websites say the exact same copied and pasted crap so itll be good to hear from peoples experiences.


    i'll be doing philosophy btw.
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    Universities full of intellectuals and nerds. Cambridge is full of those that allrounders who enroll there grumble that it's not fun. Oxford too.
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    What do you plan to study?
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    I spent one year doing Law with Politics at the University of Manchester. The academic support was absolutely dreadful; avoid Manchester uni at all cost

    I am nearing the end of my first year at Lancaster doing History and Politics. The support here is much better. Things are much easier to solve if they go wrong. Please PM me if you want further info.
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    I found Sussex Uni really understanding and helpful for mental health difficulties. As long as you tell them about it, they can help you. It's quite a liberal place in general, and people are smart and clued in about such things, and genuinely want to help.
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    I think you should pick one that has a good teaching reputation.

    A good way of figuring out whether they have a good teaching reputation is to see if one of their research strengths is computing education. Some universities have entire research departments dedicated to researching the best way to teach people concepts such as programming, from the basic right up to the more difficult stuff.

    Some unis have next to no interest in computing education, and lecturers only really lecture there so that they can get on with the important stuff to them, which is actually research. Those tend to be the bad unis to goto unless you're naturally the type of person that learns best on your own.

    Without wanting to wave a flag, Kent university is one of the good teaching ones, as they developed BlueJ, and they have a computing education research department. And Sussex, although there are certainly some great lecturers who teach there, I found not really good in general for the whole teaching thing.

    You can sometimes figure out whether departments are good at teaching by the amount of planning that is put into course module descriptions, and any accessible course materials on the CS website. You should look for those anyway, as it'll give you an idea of the subjects and stuff that will be covered.

    There is also a 'teaching' ranking for courses in several uni league tables such as the times educational supplement and the guardian league tables, and there are some student satisfaction surveys you can look up which usually mention the teaching for courses that are surveyed.

    Once you've found one you like the look of, it is probably worth declaring your disability (autism) on the application form. This will entitle you to extra support during your exams, and will give them a heads-up so they can put as much resources behind you as possible, which they will. It's illegal here to discriminate against disabilities, so you can't really lose by declaring it on the app. form Also and I know this isn't fair, but some unis actually have quotas for disabled students, so they may give you a lower offer because you're disabled, and can therefore tick off one of their boxes. Which to be honest, is great for us.
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    I find Cambridge (and therefore Oxford, as the only other University like it in England) good in the sense that the teaching is very good and clear. The Disability support is good. And the fact that they have colleges mean that often you know a tutor personally who is in a position to help improve alot of aspects about your life for you that might not be possible in a University without colleges. They don't just give advice, but tutors in colleges can do things like reallocate you to a different room in the college, make facilities available for your special needs, let you write exams in isolation, etc.
    Additionally Cambridge and Oxford have supervision/tutorial systems where you get one to one teaching by an expert in addition to your lectures. I can't stress how useful this is.
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    I find Cambridge (and therefore Oxford, as the only other University like it in England) good in the sense that the teaching is very good and clear. The Disability support is good. And the fact that they have colleges mean that often you know a tutor personally who is in a position to help improve alot of aspects about your life for you that might not be possible in a University without colleges. They don't just give advice, but tutors in colleges can do things like reallocate you to a different room in the college, make facilities available for your special needs, let you write exams in isolation, etc.
    Without trying to suggest Durham is in any way like Oxford or Cambridge (we don't get the one to one supervisions for a start. Not as standard) This is the idea behind Durham's collegiate set-up with a senior tutor as well as student support officers and a tutorial system - all people who know you and are there to help identify and resolve problems and make adjustments when needed. Change of room in college, arranging any special facilities or adjustments in college as well as chasing up staff in departments and ensuring recommended adjustments are put into place there (things like writing exams in isolation would be an exam concession and dealt with by the disability service and Student Planning and Assessment). Combined with the disablity service and departmental contacts it can make for a very strong support network.

    But it doesn't always work out in practice as many staff (and not just tutors) aren't given the training, advice and support they need and there is too much inconsistancy between colleges and departments.

    Durham does have its good points. DUSSD are great, if a little understaffed, but don't have as much authority as they should. This isn't really a problem if the student is already in a supportive department (geography, for example) but can cause problems when the student isn't in a supportive or well organised/managed department with staff who are too heavy handed and unaware of their responsilbities.

    We have our own study room for students registered with DUSSD in the library, a quiet study area which can be pre-booked and contains a range of appropriate equipment and computer software. I think we're also allowed to take things like laptops on loan, not just from the library but also the disability service. I know not all universities offer this so it's not all bad.

    No university is perfect, especially not the more traditional universities (I heard some horror stories about Oxford not so long ago, only hear good things about Cambridge). I'm borrowing the words of someone else here, but when it comes to "dealing" with students who have disabilities (whether that's implementing adjustments, showing sensitivity or whatever) it's a maturing process and this is certainly true of Durham. It's not at the level it should be, but it's hopefully getting there, and probably isn't any worse than a number of other universities.
 
 
 
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