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    Could someone explain how you get a first class honours degree? I mean don't just tell me you work really hard, I know that.
    I mean what marks do you have to get in your modules? Specifically in scotland as i know that is different due to the extra year you do? Anyone willing to break it down for me ?
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    Generally you need 70% overall to get a first class degree, though it's a bit more complicated than that really. Not sure about Scotland.
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    Doping on brain-boosting drugs
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    (Original post by secretmessages)
    Generally you need 70% overall to get a first class degree, though it's a bit more complicated than that really. Not sure about Scotland.
    Do the marks get scaled or something? I'm really confused by the credits and the module/exam marks and the different modules.

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    Well I am just about to complete my BSc and I read an ebook on exactly how to write 1st class essays. I scowered the internet trying to find some help but I cam accross this item on eBay, it was £9.99 but my god has it changed the way I write! The results speak for themselves... I always found that finding your strengths in terms of assessment helps: I am rubbish at exams but now I excel in essay assignments...
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    (Original post by + polarity -)
    Do the marks get scaled or something? I'm really confused by the credits and the module/exam marks and the different modules.

    Depends what you mean by scaling. If you mean do your marks change according to what everyone else gets (like at A level), then it depends on your uni. As for modules, different modules will often hold a higher weighting than others, but again that depends on your uni. If you can be more specific then I can try and answer more specifically? :p:
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    (Original post by + polarity -)
    Do the marks get scaled or something? I'm really confused by the credits and the module/exam marks and the different modules.

    The only way to find out for sure is to ask the people in charge of doing it.
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    If you look at any Scottish university website you will find information on its degree classifications. The requirements for each degree classification may vary slightly between universities.

    Edinburgh University has information here on its requirements in the honours degree classification document.
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    (Original post by secretmessages)
    Depends what you mean by scaling. If you mean do your marks change according to what everyone else gets (like at A level), then it depends on your uni. As for modules, different modules will often hold a higher weighting than others, but again that depends on your uni. If you can be more specific then I can try and answer more specifically? :p:
    I honestly have next to no idea.

    I know that some of my modules are worth 10 credits, a couple of them are worth 20. Most of the modules are entirely based on exams, but some of them include projects (I assume the marks for these are converted into credits and fractions of credits?).

    Do you need 70% out of the total number of credits (120 for me, I think) for a first?

    I'm just a little worried because my mid-sessional exam/progress tests weren't awesome :erm:
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    Would everyone at the same uni be able to get a first if they all achieved over 70% or does a certain amount have to get a third, 2:2 etc?
    If it is the case that not everyone in the year can get a first then surely you stand more chance at getting a first at somewhere like Northumbria as opposed to Cambridge right?
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    At my uni you have to get 70%
    so if your grades were

    30points 72%
    15points 69%
    15points 67%

    (72+72+69+67)/4=70

    where the points are how many ECATS or whatever the type of points measurement system is, so weighted to modules worth more.

    Im not sure how you get the honours bit, i think its if you dont fail anything but im not sure... id like to know though
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    (Original post by + polarity -)
    I honestly have next to no idea.

    I know that some of my modules are worth 10 credits, a couple of them are worth 20. Most of the modules are entirely based on exams, but some of them include projects (I assume the marks for these are converted into credits and fractions of credits?).

    Do you need 70% out of the total number of credits (120 for me, I think) for a first?

    I'm just a little worried because my mid-sessional exam/progress tests weren't awesome :erm:
    Ok, similar to my uni. So a module worth 10 credits will be worth 8.3% of the year, i.e. 8.3% of your total percentage from the year can come from that single module. Up to 16.7% of your total percentage can come from a module worth 20 credits. Then within those modules, they can be split up, so say 80% exam and 20% coursework, and that works in a similar way and should be quite self-explanatory (the exam will hold 4x as much weight as the coursework). If it's the same at your uni, you don't actually get given credits, they're just a way of expressing the weighting of certain modules and stuff like that. You (usually) need 70% overall to get a first for a year. Different years often hold different weights, e.g. in the ratio 10:35:55, and yet again that works in a similar way. In that case, if you get 70% in your first year, you have earned 7% towards your degree.

    In some unis it works differently, and some individual unis/modules will scale your marks so that a certain percentage of people get a 2:1 for example, but I can't say whether yours does or not.
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    (Original post by Callipygian)
    At my uni you have to get 70%
    so if your grades were

    30points 72%
    15points 69%
    15points 67%

    (72+72+69+67)/4=70

    where the points are how many ECATS or whatever the type of points measurement system is, so weighted to modules worth more.

    Im not sure how you get the honours bit, i think its if you dont fail anything but im not sure... id like to know though
    An honours degree requires you to take 360 credits over three years, and (I think) pass all of them (though this might not always be the case). A normal degree requires you to take 300 credits and, I think, pass 240 of them. So although I said above that you don't actually get given any credits, it's also used to make sure you've passed enough modules to get your required degree. If you do fail a module on an honours degree, many unis will let you retake the module to prove you can pass it (and hence you can still get the credits for it), but they will still take your original score as the one that counts towards the degree
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    If you're not at university, 70% isn't going to mean anything to you.
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    (Original post by Callipygian)
    At my uni you have to get 70%
    so if your grades were

    30points 72%
    15points 69%
    15points 67%

    (72+72+69+67)/4=70
    Some universities also have ways they can fiddle with the maths to give you a better degree classification. A lot of ******** tends to be spoken when people are talking about those things though.

    For example, at Keele the first year grades aren't used, second year grades are weighted one-third and third year grades two-thirds. This obviously makes third-year modules have more of an effect on your degree classification. People (students and staff) did say that the university will swap one module from your second year with one from your third year if it'll help you when they're working the classification out, but I never did manage to ascertain whether that was true.

    At the end of the day, this information might be interesting but it's of little practical use. Try your best and you'll be rewarded. Attempt to game the system so that you get a good mark with minimum effort and things will probably go wrong. Especially when you're relying on information from other students as to how the marking works.
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    (Original post by RadioElectric)
    At the end of the day, this information might be interesting but it's of little practical use. Try your best and you'll be rewarded. Attempt to game the system so that you get a good mark with minimum effort and things will probably go wrong. Especially when you're relying on information from other students as to how the marking works.
    Hm, I don't know. I didn't get the marks I wanted in second year and I really wasn't in the mood to think about third year if by the mark scheme it would have been impossible to pull up my marks.
    But I was then informed that my final classification is fully weighted on third year alone, if the combination of second and third year would be a less favourable outcome.
    Of course, as first and second years we were never told that there were two ways of classification, and rightly so if it meant that people worked to their best in second year. We were only all told at the start of third year.
    However, this information is all available in my university regulations which any student could have looked at if they were so interested; obviously much of my year didn't look and so didn't know until they were told.
    OP, look at your university regulations, they should tell you exactly how degrees are awarded at your university.
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    pls how hard is it to get 70% in uni....is it approximately the equivalent of getting >90% in an A-level exam???
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    (Original post by *Star*Guitar*)
    Hm, I don't know. I didn't get the marks I wanted in second year and I really wasn't in the mood to think about third year if by the mark scheme it would have been impossible to pull up my marks.
    But I was then informed that my final classification is fully weighted on third year alone, if the combination of second and third year would be a less favourable outcome.
    Of course, as first and second years we were never told that there were two ways of classification, and rightly so if it meant that people worked to their best in second year. We were only all told at the start of third year.
    However, this information is all available in my university regulations which any student could have looked at if they were so interested; obviously much of my year didn't look and so didn't know until they were told.
    OP, look at your university regulations, they should tell you exactly how degrees are awarded at your university.
    Sounds like you were told what you needed to hear when you needed to hear it then. It would have sucked if you'd realised you didn't need the marks in your second year and then flunked it.

    The other thing that I'll say (which I'll ALWAYS say) is that certain career decisions want academic transcripts in the selection process, and these contain all of your raw module marks. That's why even for modules that don't count (e.g. first year at some universities) there's still a benefit to achieving.

    (Original post by Emperor)
    pls how hard is it to get 70% in uni....is it approximately the equivalent of getting >90% in an A-level exam???
    It's very hard to compare degree to A-level. I was in love with both of the subjects I studied, and that really really helps. If forced to make the comparison, I'd say it felt about as hard as getting an A at A-level. Really though, that's more based on the achievement I felt than the actual work I put in.
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    (Original post by Emperor)
    pls how hard is it to get 70% in uni....is it approximately the equivalent of getting >90% in an A-level exam???
    It's hard to say. Obviously the content is harder, but then supposedly your knowledge and ability should be greater too. It's really difficult to estimate but if I had to, then perhaps equivalent to getting 80% at A level if you work hard.
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    (Original post by RadioElectric)
    Sounds like you were told what you needed to hear when you needed to hear it then.

    The other thing that I'll say (which I'll ALWAYS say) is that certain career decisions want academic transcripts in the selection process, and these contain all of your raw module marks. That's why even for modules that don't count (e.g. first year at some universities) there's still a benefit to achieving.
    All very true. I was given another chance for my degree but only put myself at a disadvantage when it came to work experience. Still wasn't worth it.
 
 
 
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