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How big is the jump from A-Levels to a Degree watch

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    Just curious.

    Is it the same as the jump from GCSE to A-Levels? Or greater?

    Even though I didn't even do A-Levels. My college recommended that I do BTEC National. Even though I got 5 Bs and 2 Cs including English and Maths :dontknow:.
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    I've found it easier at university for some reason...
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    I was always told you if you can do a levels you can do a degree, a levels are really intense.
    I guess requirements are high for courses because of competition, rather than difficulty. Obviously there are exceptions, but the general stress etc unless you do medicine etc isnt as bad!
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    I've heard the jump from GCSE to A Level is larger than the jump from A Level to Degree.
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    (Original post by Will1692)
    I was always told you if you can do a levels you can do a degree, a levels are really intense.
    I guess requirements are high for courses because of competition, rather than difficulty. Obviously there are exceptions, but the general stress etc unless you do medicine etc isnt as bad!
    Hmm. Well I didn't do A-Levels so I don't know if I would have coped :unsure:.
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    My history teacher is always saying "A levels will be the hardest exams you'll ever do."
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    i think it depends very much on the subjects.
    maths at a top uni is in a different world compared to further maths modules...
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    Depends what subject you do.
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    I found no step up between GCSE and AS level... but I did notice a slight step up between AS level and A2 level. Although this only applies to Psychology. It's not the exactly the content that's got harder, but it's the AMOUNT of content that is harder! Theatre is still just as easy and History has actually got easier... Oh well! I'm kind of hoping the step up to degree will be the same, as in that I don't really notice much of a difference!
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    (Original post by KatieCruel)
    My history teacher is always saying "A levels will be the hardest exams you'll ever do."
    Same
    and that you'll never face a bigger workload jump than from GCSE to A-level
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    For me, the jump from A-levels to Law degree was fairly massive.
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    I found the jump to be quite substantial; the workload at uni is extremely intense.
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    BCC in my A-Levels.

    On track for well over a 1st at University.

    Workload-wise, there's a lot more to do, but I'm finding that it's just a much better environment to work in, people around you are interested in the same things as you, so many more materials and resources and I don't have all the **** that was going on back home with me 120 miles away.
    • Community Assistant
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    It depends. At A-Level people are often aiming for an A grade and so need to work to achieve at least 80pc in their exams. When they arrive at university, however, no one wants more than 40pc in the first year and so without question everyone is finding it a breeze and much easier than A-Levels. (The issue, though, will be when they start next year and have to work that much harder to catch up.)

    Personally I've found the work a step up. It's not necessarily more difficult in terms of actual difficulty, but there's certainly more to know and learn. Also, I'm aiming for 70pc, so I'm having to put the extra work in to ensure I'm able to achieve my target.
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    I found AS levels the hardest, followed by A2, followed by degree, but obviously it depends on the person and how your mind works. I think AS levels want you to think in a very specific way, which can be quite difficult to pinpoint. A levels want you to think in quite a specific way, but there is more room for personal interpretation, which can be helpful if you don't suit prescriptive teaching/learning. Degree was quite straightforward because there was much more scope for individual analysis etc. But it depends on your character I guess, and which system of teaching/learning you respond to most effectively.
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    Depends on what degree classification you're aiming for, I think (it may or may not also depend on the institution - but I don't want to get into that one). Certainly, I found that the level of stress and expectation was lighter at university. Yet, on the other hand, the sophistication required for a First-Class essay is much, much higher than the regurgitated answer that gets you an A in school.
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    Technically degree level is quite challenging. You get taught a lot of complex stuff over such a short period of time and it can be difficult to remember everything.

    But what makes it easier (to echo DarkWhite's point) is the environment you're in. The difficulty isn't as bad as it looks because you're doing one subject 24/7. The workload is okay because everyone else on your course is there to talk to for tips/help. Plus, you aren't tied down by rigid markschemes and rubrics. University encourages free thinking and by far rewards people who are passionate about their subjects.

    For me, having done the IB, university-level geology was a lot easier. University physics has about the same workload so far, but it's much, much better than before (I hate IB Physics with a passion ).
    • PS Reviewer
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    Often what you study in the first year of a degree will have had much of it covered in the relative A levels (degrees which don't require the A level as a prerequsite of course).

    From what I can gather it's not more difficult, just more to do.

    <3
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    I disagree with a lot of people in this thread.
    Some people have qualified it depending on subject, so fair enough.
    I do maths at uni, and there is no comparison to Advanced Highers(which are a bit harder than A levels). Everything in school is a joke in comparison to a degree I find.
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    Majority of my teachers say A-Levels are generally harder than degrees, depending on what degree you are doing
 
 
 
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