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    Really does depend on the subject, I personally find Uni harder than A levels...
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    It felt like a natural progression to me, rather than any sort of step.
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    The step up from A-Levels to a difficult university degree is gigantic, much larger than the jump from GCSEs to A-Levels.
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    the jump from a level to degree is massive compared to gcse to a level. I found a levels relativley easy and now am only getting 40% marks at uni.
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    In hindsight, A-levels were a walk in the park.
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    im doing computer science to be specifc at warwick and boy
    im always nevous and stressed regularly the assignments are coming in like nobodys business and the maths is sooo hard compared to a-levels i never felt a jump from gcse to a-level but to degree level this isnt a jump is like jumping from one continent to the next. but dnt get worried its subject dependant and possibly university dependant.
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    (Original post by .ACS.)
    It depends. At A-Level people are often aiming for an A grade and so need to work to achieve at least 80pc in their exams. When they arrive at university, however, no one wants more than 40pc in the first year and so without question everyone is finding it a breeze and much easier than A-Levels. (The issue, though, will be when they start next year and have to work that much harder to catch up.)

    Personally I've found the work a step up. It's not necessarily more difficult in terms of actual difficulty, but there's certainly more to know and learn. Also, I'm aiming for 70pc, so I'm having to put the extra work in to ensure I'm able to achieve my target.
    Why? What happens after you reach 40% in the first year?
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    (Original post by aeterno)
    It's really quite subjective.

    For me, the biggest jump was from AS to A2; despite doing one less subject, I had twice the amount of work to do and we had to move from topic to topic quite quickly towards the end (which is more thanks to the crappy organisation of my teachers though).

    I think I was expecting more of a jump from A2 to degree level than there actually was, so it didn't seem so bad. Besides I absolutely hated school but love uni!

    Considering there are less hours of actually sitting in a room listening to someone talking, you have more time to actually do your work (unless of course you doss around in your 1st year and do everything at the last minute...or not at all).

    Also, I agree that most people are aiming for 40% and not really caring about how they do which is, quite frankly, pathetic. Just because it doesn't count doesn't mean they should not bother. 1st year is there for people to adjust to uni life - to get used to what is classed as a degree level essay; independent learning etc. - and if they don't take advantage of this, then they're going to suffer in their 2nd/3rd years. In fact, a few people on my course didn't even bother to submit the first few assignments just because they weren't worth much of the overall grade for the module. Here's hoping they decide uni's not for them and sod off next year :p:
    So in the first year, anything above 40% will not count? .

    I don't really know how a degree works.
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    (Original post by EierVonSatan)
    40% is the typical 'grade' you need to get to pass the year and continue to the next. On many courses (but certainly not all) the first year doesn't count towards the final degree class
    Oh. Well if the first year doesn't even count then I guess I could understand why people just aim for the bare minimum.
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    (Original post by Darth Lettuce)
    Why? What happens after you reach 40% in the first year?
    You need 40pc to pass from the first year to the second, but your first year marks don't count. (So if you got 70pc in your first year, it's good for you, but doesn't count toward your final degree. Though, that said, employers want you to do well for internships.)
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    (Original post by MrChem)
    I think the OP was looking for personal thoughts from people at uni, not anecdotes.
    Considering it came from my teacher who went to university, its a fairly accurate prediction, nice to see you contributed to the thread :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    This. Considering that A-levels are apparently somewhat easier than Highers/Advanced Highers
    They're not, I don't think. I sat highers in maths and physics and computing etc and from reading the study help I honestly think that A-levels are at least slightly more challenging.

    And yes, science subjects are much harder at university.
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    Study help section of this forum.

    Advanced highers can get you direct entry into second year at Scottish universities if you get good enough grades. Maybe they are harder than A2...

    Either way, reading the study help sections of this forum made me feel inferior to my English brethren in terms of knowledge until I went to university. Maybe higher maths just teaches different stuff from A-level maths?
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    (Original post by Smack)
    They're not, I don't think. I sat highers in maths and physics and computing etc and from reading the study help I honestly think that A-levels are at least slightly more challenging.

    And yes, science subjects are much harder at university.
    I can't speak for most of the subjects I did(because I didn't really do much in AH chem/physics), but AH maths contains rather more than A level maths(certainly in terms of pure maths), but a bit less than A level maths+A level further maths. Also, A levels have about double the level of A grade passes of higher/advanced highers, possibly in part due to their modular nature.
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    (Original post by Darth Lettuce)
    So in the first year, anything above 40% will not count? .

    I don't really know how a degree works.
    At most unis, the first year doesn't count towards your final degree classification and you only need 40% to be allowed to progress into the second year. Hence the 'I don't care' attitude that most first years tend to have.

    EDIT: I just realised someone has already answered this for you :p:
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Study help section of this forum.

    Advanced highers can get you direct entry into second year at Scottish universities if you get good enough grades. Maybe they are harder than A2...

    Either way, reading the study help sections of this forum made me feel inferior to my English brethren in terms of knowledge until I went to university. Maybe higher maths just teaches different stuff from A-level maths?
    A levels can get you into second year in Scottish unis too.
    But Cambridge and Warwick at least(for maths) have lower standard offers than for A levels.
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    (Original post by Slumpy)
    I can't speak for most of the subjects I did(because I didn't really do much in AH chem/physics), but AH maths contains rather more than A level maths(certainly in terms of pure maths), but a bit less than A level maths+A level further maths. Also, A levels have about double the level of A grade passes of higher/advanced highers, possibly in part due to their modular nature.
    Highers are pretty modular too, are they not? I mean, we had to sit and pass all the nabs and ****.
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    (Original post by Smack)
    Highers are pretty modular too, are they not? I mean, we had to sit and pass all the nabs and ****.
    Not in the same way. We have to sit the NABs to sit the exam, but they have no bearing on your final result, which is all decided in one exam. In A level(or A level) it's the sum over 6(or 3 for AS) modules, which can be sat over 4 different periods, with resits allowed.
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    However, I would probably find A-levels worse because of modules. I'd like my whole grade to come from one, huge effort; not several over the course of the year. Though according to Slumpy apparently that makes it easier for most people.
    I find the one go at a time easier too. Means you don't need to know anything for most of the year. However, the module system allows for retakes to get higher scores in modules than you might otherwise have got, by retaking. I think at the top end it makes no odds, but in the middle it might make a bit of difference.
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    (Original post by MrChem)
    Considering your teacher went to uni what, 10-20 years ago, maybe 30, its fair to say the education system has changed since then?

    My contribution would purely be on what someone else (i.e. a teacher) has told me, so saying "yeah I think it is because so and so told me it was when they did their degree 20 years ago" doesn't help much. No more than yours did. So I figured I'd just point out the interesting fact that the majority of people giving an answer to a question about the difference in a level and degree hadn't studied for a degree. You not find it slightly amusing?
    I find it amusing that you go out of your way just to say the advice isnt politically correct, the OP has a brain and it will give him a better than idea than he/she had before, i never said i have been to uni.
    Some advice is better than no advise, there is no need for you to go "hold on", this isnt correct, i must inform everyone. The OP can take what he wants from the info.
 
 
 
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