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How big is the jump from A-Levels to a Degree watch

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    (Original post by MrChem)
    Where does political correctness come into anything I ever said?
    Your saying it isnt allowed to post something unless it is completely 100% correct and accurate.
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    (Original post by MrChem)
    Nothing to do with politics.
    Obviously :rolleyes: Its a figure of speech! See again your brain can only think in one way, you cant see outside of the box. Your focused in one way and if it goes off that you feel on edge :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by MrChem)
    *You're

    And I can see outside the box very well thanks. Anyway, good day to you.
    That completely proves my point, you have to correct everything! You had to correct people for posting a very valid opinion, then for me saying political when it wasnt technically correct, then a simple error and im flamed again. Your really need to chill man.
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    (Original post by MrChem)
    *You're

    And I can see outside the box very well thanks. Anyway, good day to you.
    Don't start sentences with a conjunction, especially when you make a point of displaying your pedanticism in the very same post.
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    A-levels were harder in the sense of having to do three/four subjects, spend all day in school etc etc. Plus at my school we were pushed incredibly hard, and we were close to our teachers so doing badly felt like you were disappointing them....so emotionally it was more draining at school.
    At degree... like others have said, you've just got the one subject...depending on what you're studying, you're in control of your own time mostly [whether that's a pro or a con, I'm not sure :p: I think the biggest thing I've learnt at uni is time mangement - or not, since I'm on here instead of doing the pile of work next to me...] and I find it a lot less pressurised. Apart from when you realise you've not done the massive pile of work next to you [*cough*] it's not like school with constant checking up on progress etc.
    However, for history, I think there is a definite jump. For one thing, the quantity to read is enormous - at A-level you pretty much have the facts, then you make an argument out of them. At uni, it's reading reading reading, your own interpretations, your own selection of the important points and then trying to craft them into some sort of coherant shape. A very very different process.
    ...and as my degree progresses, instead of feeling more knowledgable, I'm just becoming more aware of how much I don't know!
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    I found by studying history at A-Level, made moving to Degree level much easier, I'm not sure if its a case of the harder the subject, the easier the transition will be, but I'm finding that what my history teachers told me about essay writing and technique is also being taught at University. It all depends on the subject.
 
 
 
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