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    I'm targeted as a B grade in english, though my teacher said at the start of year 10 that I could get an A. I'm halfway through year 11, and I'd reeeally love to get an A in english, but my writing skills let me down, our courseworks are being moderated by the exam board next friday, so I'd like to get high B's and A's in my courseworks. Does anyone have any tips?
    Thanks
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    Hey I'm also targeted a Grade B in English but would really like an A. My teacher says the trick to writing better is to know your purpose and audience very well and also to use many devices like facts, opinions, wide vocab would help in description writing and rhetorical questions would help in writing to argue/persuade to engage the reader.
    Also using emotive language would make your writing seem much better e.g 'The way you treat us is disgusting'
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    Well it's probably too late now.. but I improved my writing skills gradually by reading more (especially reading the paper every day.. aswell as more books)
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    (Original post by T-Reks)
    Well, it helps to have a broad range of sophisticated vocabulary, and read some good books to see how the authors write, take ideas and make them your own, look at the structure and how they make their books good. Most people just read the book to know what happens in it, but analysing the style in which the books are written in can help.

    I went to peotry live today and met the poets eg John Agard etc, and the chief examiner was there, he said that sometimes candidates have good ideas and soemtimes they just leave them be without any exploration, or deeper meanings, he said that he wants to see the response being interpreted in its own way by indivduals.

    ps what did you get in the coursework?
    I see your slang has disappeared. And your negs seem to have got a tad worse :p: lol
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    Look on coursework.info They have plenty of sample essays on there.

    You can read some A*Grade essays and some B grade essays and see the difference for yourself.

    I did this and the lowest grade i got in GCSE english essays was a high A, most were A*s.
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    I can send you some of my old essays if you like.
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    Read more to improve your vocabulary. Try to write something you'd want to read, and be interested in. Try to be witty with your writing. When talking about novels, analyse language! Look at small exerpts, look at the type of words used (noun/adjective, even the basics can lead to excellent literary analysis) and how they function in the text. What roles do the words play, how do they effect your view of the text as a whole?

    If you like, I can look over some of your work and give you some pointers. I'd love to help out :3
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    (Original post by T-Reks)
    Well, it helps to have a broad range of sophisticated vocabulary, and read some good books to see how the authors write, take ideas and make them your own, look at the structure and how they make their books good. Most people just read the book to know what happens in it, but analysing the style in which the books are written in can help.

    I went to peotry live today and met the poets eg John Agard etc, and the chief examiner was there, he said that sometimes candidates have good ideas and sometimes they just leave them be without any exploration, or deeper meanings, he said that he wants to see the response being interpreted in its own way by indivduals. And structure your respnse clearly, when comparing poems, write baout both in one paragraph, with mini conclusions, and make sure you write enoguh for each, he gave an example of someone who wrote more for one than the other!

    ps what did you get in the coursework?
    I don't know what I got in the courseworks, apart from the "day in the life of" biography style coursework, which was a strong B and my teacher has given it back to me to make it an A. But that's literally the only one I know my grades for, but I'm re-drafting the rest of my courseworks next week, so hooopefully they'll be B's to A's. D':
    What about you?
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    (Original post by procrastination...)
    I'm targeted as a B grade in english, though my teacher said at the start of year 10 that I could get an A. I'm halfway through year 11, and I'd reeeally love to get an A in english, but my writing skills let me down, our courseworks are being moderated by the exam board next friday, so I'd like to get high B's and A's in my courseworks. Does anyone have any tips?
    Thanks
    I got an A in language and a B in lit. my coursework's were all high b's and A's apart from my media piece which was a C >.<
    I found the best way was really asking my teacher for help repeatedly. I knew the stuff, just couldn't write it. Go to your teacher and say you need advice on the technique.
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    My advice would be to make coherent, relevant points, using good vocabluary. Try to pick up the complex points of whatever text you're studying, and explain them with a bit of personal interpretation. If you're doing any creative writing, just try to write a lot of decent description with some basic characters and plot. I can't really remember doing the latter type that well, I did English last year but Literature this year.

    I think the trick to getting a high mark is also not to sound clumsy with your writing. Try playing around with word order and synonyms until what you've written sounds fluent.

    A good introduction and conclusion are both very important, as well. Just ask your teacher about that.
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    Read.
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    Lots of nice long words - used correctly obviously, even if you're not 100% sure what you're actually on about or indeed what they mean.

    I realise that sounds like an idiotic response, but I'm serious. I put many a successful exam/piece of coursework down to my ability to be able to waffle on (clearly and concisely, obviously) in an intelligent sounding way, even if I have no idea about what I'm even writing. Works wonders every time.
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    I assume this is GCSE level? In which case, I recommend you use the P.E.E. system - point, evaluate, explain. For example, you could say something like

    "The speaker in Carol Ann Duffy's poem 'Havisham' has a hatred of men. This is demonstrated by the use of violent, emotive imagery and language, such as 'give me a male corpse for a long, slow honeymoon' and 'beloved sweetheart *******'. In the case of 'beloved sweetheart *******', this is further emphasized by the repetition of the plosive letter 'b', which implies that speaker is spitting the words out. This is perhaps due to the abandoment of Miss Havisham by her lover in Dickens' 'Great Expectations', upon which Duffy draws for this poem'.

    That's just off the top of my head, but that's kind of what I was told. And yes, don't be afraid to have your own ideas. You can say whatever you want, as long as you can find some evidence for it in the text.
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    (Original post by charlottesometimes)
    I assume this is GCSE level? In which case, I recommend you use the P.E.E. system - point, evaluate, explain. For example, you could say something like

    "The speaker in Carol Ann Duffy's poem 'Havisham' has a hatred of men. This is demonstrated by the use of violent, emotive imagery and language, such as 'give me a male corpse for a long, slow honeymoon' and 'beloved sweetheart *******'. In the case of 'beloved sweetheart *******', this is further emphasized by the repetition of the plosive letter 'b', which implies that speaker is spitting the words out. This is perhaps due to the abandoment of Miss Havisham by her lover in Dickens' 'Great Expectations', upon which Duffy draws for this poem'.

    That's just off the top of my head, but that's kind of what I was told. And yes, don't be afraid to have your own ideas. You can say whatever you want, as long as you can find some evidence for it in the text.
    This, but I'll amend PEE to PEEL, with the L standing for "Link back to the question".
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    (Original post by Muffinz)
    This, but I'll amend PEE to PEEL, with the L standing for "Link back to the question".
    DEFINITELY. That's the other thing I meant to mention, haha, answer the damn question on the paper, not the question you've practised in lessons and you hoped would come up. If it's any consolation, OP, we were told this constantly even at A-level - and, in fact, I've just seen it in a list of guidelines for answering Cambridge exam questions. So. Quite important :P

    Edited because I apparently can't spell 'guidelines'. That's what I get for namedropping Cambridge :P
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    Find a distinctive style that suits you. Flair is the ultimate win.
 
 
 
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