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    I have a few international awards in maths during high-school times (maybe that helps) and I'm studying Eco & Maths also was doing a lot of work during summer as I said(econometrics). Got rejected by Chicago(main reason they haven't seen enough determination for academic career, they only prepare academics) still waiting for Harvard. And yeah maths is very important. I know a few people who are doing Phd just with maths major.

    About Asians they can get Scholarships from governments it is not that hard though I do not know anything about A levels as I haven't done them and this was the reason why my undergraduate University is just top 20 UK others don't recognise my high-school diploma.

    Are you doing Phd in Economics? Have you applied to US?

    (Original post by henrykravis)
    If you had Chicago instead of Columbia, he would have done a similar comparison, trust me! Lucas, Becker and Heckman are those kind of economists that UK unis can dream of having and are happy even if they agree to give a 'talk' on their campuses. Oxbridge I must say are of no match to those departments.People find it hard to believe when I tell them that most applicants from Oxbridge to top-'20' departments are rejected! You must have a very strong math background?

    I am assuming you know your stuff very well, but at times, I feel sorry for International students applying for post-grad/jobs (especially from Asia) who are being advised by A-leve;/first year students on this forum and sadly, the international students seem to take the advise seriously!!!:confused:

    I also love the way he said Cambridge is definitely better than Oxford Economics. It is EXACTLY the opposite, atleast at post-grad level. I chose Cambridge in the end just for financial reasons, my place at Oxford was not funded.

    As I mentioned earlier mate, stay away from audit/ACA. PE is altogther a different world in terms of competition - even IBD analysts are problems in entering that industry. If you good enough to get into PhD Columbia, then you are TOO good for audit.
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    Nop, but those few who have the opportunity to work with them become world-know people and the knowledge you would get is priceless.

    I haven't applied to LSE, they rejected me as an undergrad so **** them

    (Original post by grt)
    Hm... interesting. After having read the second half of the posts here, I start to see the usual TSR pattern again. Comparing apples when oranges.

    Do you (most posters here) honestly believe that some more or less known theoretical economists at your department will help you finding an IB job? Or if doing a (similar) post-grad degree at Cambridge or at Oxford would actually matter? In terms of UK vs US universities, it should - because of the different culture and as far as I'm aware, there's a huge bias in the US towards US universities.

    One way or another, whether you get a job afterwards depends mainly on your work experience, your academic grades and if the HR department likes your CV's font.
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    (Original post by greenyblue_eyes)
    Would agree with this on the fixed income side.

    MPhil/PhD in Econ might help with a macro fund though.
    Definitely fixed income. But the thing is for the vast majority of quantitative analyst positions, besides the high quantitative skills required for the job, a good 50% of your time will be spent coding (probably with C++). Somehow I don't think many econ PhDs have spent time coding and implementing numerical methods for PDEs/SDEs...
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    (Original post by uk.england.john.rooney)
    Nop, but those few who have the opportunity to work with them become world-know people and the knowledge you would get is priceless.
    I agree. However, this matters almost exclusively for PhD students/post-docs.

    On a personal note: From what you apparently have succeeded in so far in your life, ending up in the banking sector looks like a waste of ability and/or potential. Maybe you should consider studying a bit more (Columbia?) to have more time to think about what you'd really like to do in life.
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    Thanks Probably why I am having all these thoughts because I am young and IB seems lucrative, you understand what I am about.
    I will take my time to talk with more people about this but is very nice that people share their view.

    (Original post by grt)
    I agree. However, this matters almost exclusively for PhD students/post-docs.

    On a personal note: From what you apparently have succeeded in so far in your life, ending up in the banking sector looks like a waste of ability and/or potential. Maybe you should consider studying a bit more (Columbia?) to have more time to think about what you'd really like to do in life.
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    (Original post by greenyblue_eyes)
    Write a very good thesis/dissertation.

    Or do a research project with a professor.

    Have friends with undergrad published papers in both ways.

    Yeah I thought of doing the second option, now I do need to see if it wouldn't be too stupid to stay at uni to do research while I could be abroad practising, but thanks for the idea
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    (Original post by uk.england.john.rooney)
    Thanks Probably why I am having all these thoughts because I am young and IB seems lucrative, you understand what I am about.
    I will take my time to talk with more people about this but is very nice that people share their view.
    Do so. I'm surrounded by all these 18-22 year old wannabe investment bankers here in London. If you ask them why they're so interested in it, they start telling you about products and all of this stuff. If you keep asking, they will eventually tell you that it's about the money. And some of them didn't even realise it.

    I was going through the same when I was that age (I'm a couple of years older now), focused on money and status. I realised that there's more in life.

    Anyway, this is the wrong thread, the wrong forum and probably the wrong environment to convince students of leaving the path of pure evil

    And, who knows, one day I might be the one regulating (or being bribed by) you
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    (Original post by grt)
    If you ask them why they're so interested in it, they start telling you about products and all of this stuff. If you keep asking, they will eventually tell you that it's about the money. And some of them didn't even realise it.
    Money is a big part, but I think that the IB world can give you many more things: technical knowledge, network, etc...

    Many of my friends (and me, too) see IB as a step toward a long-term goal: e.g. found an NGO that helps SMEs in developing countries, run an MFI, buy a wine estate in South Africa or start a (hedge) fund investing in frontier markets.

    BTW, answering to OP, I would chose Columbia or Cambridge
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    They're a great set of options. Definitely rule out PwC - you'd be selling youself short. You've already seen how important brand is when breaking into IB and putting PwC on your CV isn't going to do you any favours.

    Columbia is a phenomenal department - Stiglitz, Sachs, Phelps, Bhagwahti, Sala-i-Martin, Mundell - there aren't many better. But 4 years is a big commitment and if IB (or even just money) is your goal then a Phd is not an efficient way to get there. If you think you'd like it though, you'll never go hungry with a Econ Phd from columbia, so I still think it'd open up great opportunities as an academic/professional economist in a bank/imf/world bank etc.

    Taking your desire to get into PE at face value, the best route is through IBD at a top bank. To get there, a good option would be oxford because it would allow you to a)get some work experience this summer b) get an IBD internship next summer. This would be the best route to IBD. Also, the 2 years plus work experience would give you a chance to figure out what you really want to pursue. Given your background, I'd imagine IBD would bpre the hell out of you
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    a PhD is a long, lonely, and frustrating process which has no payoff at the end unless you want to go into academia. i would advise against it.
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    (Original post by grt)

    On a personal note: From what you apparently have succeeded in so far in your life, ending up in the banking sector looks like a waste of ability and/or potential. Maybe you should consider studying a bit more (Columbia?) to have more time to think about what you'd really like to do in life.
    I think I would agree with this. You are still young and have a lot of time to make a lot of money. I doubt you will get the opportunity to do a PHD at Columbia ever again! As mentioned in this thread, the department is absolutely brilliant and you seem to have the academic ability to do it even though you do not want a career in academia and they see your potential.

    Maybe in three/four years you will find IB pointless and you want to go back into academia? that will be harder, I imagine, to get back into, especially Columbia, compared with having a PHD and going into IB after four years...
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    This sounds as an utopian dream.

    (Original post by Pitoburo)
    Money is a big part, but I think that the IB world can give you many more things: technical knowledge, network, etc...

    Many of my friends (and me, too) see IB as a step toward a long-term goal: e.g. found an NGO that helps SMEs in developing countries, run an MFI, buy a wine estate in South Africa or start a (hedge) fund investing in frontier markets.

    BTW, answering to OP, I would chose Columbia or Cambridge
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    Agree. One of the most attractive things is that they don't have a lot of Phd candidates at top departments, so your degree won't be 'inflated' compared with MBAs..

    (Original post by iamru)
    I think I would agree with this. You are still young and have a lot of time to make a lot of money. I doubt you will get the opportunity to do a PHD at Columbia ever again! As mentioned in this thread, the department is absolutely brilliant and you seem to have the academic ability to do it even though you do not want a career in academia and they see your potential.

    Maybe in three/four years you will find IB pointless and you want to go back into academia? that will be harder, I imagine, to get back into, especially Columbia, compared with having a PHD and going into IB after four years...
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    (Original post by Pitoburo)
    Money is a big part, but I think that the IB world can give you many more things: technical knowledge, network, etc...

    Many of my friends (and me, too) see IB as a step toward a long-term goal: e.g. found an NGO that helps SMEs in developing countries, run an MFI, buy a wine estate in South Africa or start a (hedge) fund investing in frontier markets.
    At least you still have a dream. Hold on to it.
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    Wow, pretty nice... First, PwC no way.
    I would choose between Columbia and Cambridge. Depending on what you want to do afterwards / you could imagine doing 4 years Phd.
    I saw you are just 20 years old. 1 year MPhil Cambridge and you are still just 21 with a Cambridge Master degree under your belt. You will sure get some nice FO offers and looking forward in a few years you can be a VP at still a quite young age and earn lots of money.
    As stated before Phd would be great for quant positions. Make sure you acquire tons of math and programming skills. And if your are one of the really smart ones and got great ideas, you can soon make tons of money with a nice PnL share :-)
    Finally, it really depends on what kind of job you want to do in a few years and what really excites you.
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    (Original post by awm55)
    a PhD is a long, lonely, and frustrating process which has no payoff at the end unless you want to go into academia. i would advise against it.
    Out of interest, have you done a PhD? If so, in which area?

    I'm doing a PhD because I'm really interested in my subject area, not because I believe that it will boost my career prospects. That said, all the jobs I am looking at require a PhD.
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    (Original post by Krush)
    Out of interest, have you done a PhD? If so, in which area?

    I'm doing a PhD because I'm really interested in my subject area, not because I believe that it will boost my career prospects. That said, all the jobs I am looking at require a PhD.
    really? do you want to be a quant?

    I know a few people who are doing them and they are less than thrilled tbh. do you really want to spend the next 4 years of your life researching? i can't think of any reason to do one unless you want to go into academia.
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    (Original post by uk.england.john.rooney)
    This sounds as an utopian dream.
    I worked in the non-profit sector and, at high levels, many people have banking, consulting or international organizations background. Simply because they have a large network, essential when you are looking for donors, investors or partners.
    And in some sectors (particularly microfinance investment/consulting) you'll find people with Wharton MBAs and/or past experiences in MBB, GS PE, JPM S&T, etc..

    And I know many people who left IB to start their own companies: a family friend was a Senior VP (IBD), now she lives in Brazil where she opened a successful textile manufacturer.

    Going back to the main topic, a PhD in Economics is really useful only if you want to be an economist in the research department. Maybe you can specialize in econometrics, but I think you'll be always considered less interesting than a PhD in Finance or in an ultra-quant subject.
    I would choose Cambridge if you aren't really so sure...
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    (Original post by awm55)
    really? do you want to be a quant?

    I know a few people who are doing them and they are less than thrilled tbh. do you really want to spend the next 4 years of your life researching? i can't think of any reason to do one unless you want to go into academia.
    Yep, working as a quant would be one of the career paths I will consider once I finish my PhD. But more generally any sector that requires the mathematical expertise I have developed throughout my PhD would be a potential option, whether in academia or in the industrial sector.

    Do I want to spend 4 years of my life researching? Of course, I love my subject and I want to make a significant contribution to my area of interest.

    Reason to do one? Pure interest for the subject, which does not mean that I want to spend my entire life in academia.
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    (Original post by Krush)
    Yep, working as a quant would be one of the career paths I will consider once I finish my PhD. But more generally any sector that requires the mathematical expertise I have developed throughout my PhD would be a potential option, whether in academia or in the industrial sector.

    Do I want to spend 4 years of my life researching? Of course, I love my subject and I want to make a significant contribution to my area of interest.

    Reason to do one? Pure interest for the subject, which does not mean that I want to spend my entire life in academia.
    no offense but you sound a bit idealistic at the moment.

    i really recommend going to the Wilmott forums where the people are entirely quant based and have taken quantitative disciplines to the PhD level and way beyond. you will likely gain some interesting insight.
 
 
 
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