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Do you think you might regret choosing psychology? watch

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    (Original post by jennielovesneilpoo)
    I did psychology at access and have now been accepted to do Psychology (criminal behaviour) at Southampton Solent and still waiting on Forensic Psych at Portsmouth. I think it can come as a shock to people who haven't studied it before, like you said you never really get any solid answers. I think to do it and stick at it you have to enjoy that kind of subject and be able to come up with your own ideas (with past studies to support it of course, lol). Good Luck!!!
    Thats what i did! Have applied and had a conditional offer at Canterbury for Applied Criminology and Psychology. I actually cant wait to go. Id never studied it before Access either.
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
    The reasons I'm not happy studying Psychology:

    1. Too many undergraduates. It's a great subject, but its the open access that is letting it down big time. Instead of the swelling departments that we have now, universities need to bump up their entry requirements and accept only the leading students.

    Why? Not enough demand of Psych graduates to justify the supply. When everyone and their dog has a Psych degree, it looks bad. Even worse, when a large proportion of those representing the field are ditsy "i-wan-be-developmontol-clinukol-psychologost" types, it's even worse. I now cringe when I hear that someone is studying Psychology, and I hate telling people what I study. I'm actually embarrased by the choice I've made.

    2. Not enough Biology. I'm a firm Materialist, and I strongly believe that one day the cartesian gap will be bridged by neuroscience and there will be zero need for Psychologists or the concept of "the mind". This is probably my own fault for choosing Psychology over Neuroscience and is something I can get over once I select my third year modules. However, this means I fundamentally disagree with the prevailing opinion within most undergraduates in my field whom appear to still be selecting higher-level explanations over more fundamental lower-level theories.

    3. Not enough stats. I love stats.

    4. Most of Psychology is not useful. I dread the day when someone asks me "So what has Psychology done for mankind?" if I am unable to refer to cognitive neuroscience instead.

    5. The students are annoying 9 times out of 10. They all seem to think they're going to waltz into the D.Clin.Psych the September after graduation.

    6. A-Level Psychology is a joke in its current state. It needs to either be reformed or scrapped completely. It makes the field look bad.

    Good thread. I needed that rant. Now back to my essay/watching Evan Almighty.
    I had you in mind when I made this thread. :p: I thought it wouldn't be long before you replied.

    The bit in bold... I'm not happy to say it, but I know what you mean. I hate the way it's seen as a doss subject for people who can't do anything else or don't know what they want. Again, I'm reluctant to admit it, but that would put me off studying psychology at certain places.

    I've also been leaning more and more heavily towards neuroscience, but I didn't apply for it because I'm most interested in the higher level functions studied in psychology. I also prefer the variety in psychology and the, I imagine, greater opportunities for debate.

    To be honest, I'm not particularly interested in the practical applications, just understanding the mind for its own sake, and I loathe things like consumer and sport psychology. I think I prefer asking questions and asking more questions than actually finding absolute answers. Hmm... perhaps psychology will suit me after all.
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    I must say it's relieving to know that people are in the same situation as me. I took the As Level at school and the course was awful, the course content was really interesting but the lessons were abysmal. It was a distance learning course (I'm beginning to hate those words) with the most uninterested teachers 'supervising'. By the end of it I just took all my books and folders home and just did it there. But I really got into it from there and found it more and more interesting.

    All was fine until I found a former Psych student who was kind enough to show me some of her old lecture notes. Then the amount of maths involved really dawned on me. At first I thought her statistic notes were just normal prose because of the amount of algebra.

    Now though after reading it through I have got over the shock and I think I ready for it.

    I'm on a gap year now and I'm going to Canterbury Christ Church next September. Hopefully things will go better than those lessons two years ago

    Sorry about the ranting.
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    It worries me that so many people take psychology... and that it is so easily accessible.

    But, on the other hand, I enjoy the subject immensely, I'm not doing it necessarily to go into the profession (I have thought about it, and I've decided to just wait and see how I feel after my degree before making any hard and fast 'I'm going to become this! :awesome:' decisions) and I'm not under illusions that it won't be a hard slog especially the stats!
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    (Original post by llacerta)
    This is a bit OT, but can you go on to study neuroscience at post-grad after a psych undergrad degree?

    I know some people don't like the fact that psychology doesn't have straightforward answers, but in my opinion that's why I'll enjoy it perhaps more than I would have done with a biology or chemistry degree.

    Plus a lot of people on that other thread seemed to be questioning what exactly they could do with a psych degree, and felt as if it didn't have much relevance in the real world- something I find rather ironic considering how a lot of other degrees, such as history or English, don't directly relate to a particular job whilse psychology can. Plus, psychology is the study of human behaviour (especially when considering the biological aspects). What else could be more relevant?
    Absolutely.

    That's what I've always said and it's one of the reasons I chose it. I just don't know if I'll feel the same studying psychology and nothing else day in, day out for 3 years.

    I was mainly referring to the conversation between myself and LatinMachine on the last couple of pages (hence I linked p4 rather than the beginning of the thread) and a few posts by other users, such as LordAsriel. I didn't actually look at the first 3 pages before linking it or even the OP. (I did when I was posting in it, but today I was just looking for the last bit.) Looking at it, that really wasn't clear at all sorry.
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    (Original post by Meliae)
    I had you in mind when I made this thread. :p: I thought it wouldn't be long before you replied.


    I'm such a grumpy buggar!
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    (Original post by Meliae)
    Absolutely.

    That's what I've always said and it's one of the reasons I chose it. I just don't know if I'll feel the same studying psychology and nothing else day in, day out for 3 years.

    I was mainly referring to the conversation between myself and LatinMachine on the last couple of pages (hence I linked p4 rather than the beginning of the thread) and a few posts by other users, such as LordAsriel. I didn't actually look at the first 3 pages before linking it or even the OP. (I did when I was posting in it, but today I was just looking for the last bit.)
    Ah, I see. Well, we're in agreeance then.

    Yeah, I know what you mean about studying the same subject for three years...But I guess that could apply to a lot of subjects. I love a bit of physics, for example (despite being pretty crappy at it) but I couldn't bear to do it for three years. I guess psychology seemed more appealing because it does, as a lot of people say, have quite a bit of variety for those who have strengths in a range of fields- you have the chance to write essays, to use maths, to form your own opinions, etc. I can see why some people might get fed up of not ever having the 'answer', but I wouldn't be surprised if a lot of people get tired of their degree subject at some point (and, conversely, they then find a new passion for their subject in a different area, perhaps.)
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    (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)


    I'm such a grumpy buggar!
    I love the fact that you're both a strong representative of psychology on these forums, as well as being someone who doesn't actually like a lot of aspects of the degree. There's something cool about that.

    Plus your blog is awesomesauce. :woo:

    *arse-licking over*
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    (Original post by llacerta)
    I love the fact that you're both a strong representative of psychology on these forums, as well as being someone who doesn't actually like a lot of aspects of the degree. There's something cool about that.

    Plus your blog is awesomesauce. :woo:

    *arse-licking over*
    Lol! Thanks!

    But I must point out that Neuroskeptic blog is not mine; I've just linked it because I enjoy reading it so much. I should probably put that in my sig!
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    where is this wiki section where students have dropped out (im interested in the econ ones)
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    why are people saying AS/A2 psychologys rubbish and stuff, i do AS psychology atm and i'm really enjoying it, and its not easy! it is pretty challenging


    or maybe you're all smarter than me, meh
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    (Original post by Rimipie)
    why are people saying AS/A2 psychologys rubbish and stuff, i do AS psychology atm and i'm really enjoying it, and its not easy! it is pretty challenging

    or maybe you're all smarter than me, meh
    Difficulty is not the definition of a good A-level.

    A-Level Psychology does not do the subject well. While good in some ways, it just focuses way too much on memorisation and regurgitation. It just expects students to remember a bunch of studies and spurt it back out. There is very little expansion of understanding, in that it treats every topic as if they are isolated cells of theory.

    The exam questions are far too predictable and students take advantage of that.

    It also needs to focus more on experimental design and statistical methods. The fact that AQA have pulled their coursework module is just stupid (if anything, coursework should consist of multiple lab reports), and their attempts to copy-cat Physics/Chem/Bio papers is not appropriate for the subject. It needs to be essay based. Bring back the 24 mark essays x3 per module.

    It also needs to encourage students to use research databases like PsychINFO and MetaLib to formulate their own opinions. It presents Psychology as a clear cut field: "This is theory X, it has research A B and C supporting it, and D E and F against it", with no other existing research other than that.

    It's not working well. Needs serious reform.
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    (Original post by jabed786)
    where is this wiki section where students have dropped out (im interested in the econ ones)
    I don't recall seeing any econ ones and they don't all name their subjects, but here: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...dents%27_Guide

    Scroll down to case studies and there are pages for those who did and didn't end up dropping out.

    (Original post by llacerta)
    Ah, I see. Well, we're in agreeance then.

    Yeah, I know what you mean about studying the same subject for three years...But I guess that could apply to a lot of subjects. I love a bit of physics, for example (despite being pretty crappy at it) but I couldn't bear to do it for three years. I guess psychology seemed more appealing because it does, as a lot of people say, have quite a bit of variety for those who have strengths in a range of fields- you have the chance to write essays, to use maths, to form your own opinions, etc. I can see why some people might get fed up of not ever having the 'answer', but I wouldn't be surprised if a lot of people get tired of their degree subject at some point (and, conversely, they then find a new passion for their subject in a different area, perhaps.)
    Yeah, absolutely, and psychology is the subject I most want to study for three years. My ability is pretty much the same in every subject and I'm interested in a lot of things, so the bit in bold is one of the reasons I took it too. I love the way it links with so many other subjects and the many different ways of approaching it. A lot of other subjects feel too narrow. Thinking about it, I love questioning things and I generally enjoy arts more than sciences so a lack of answers probably won't bother me. I think the thing with sciences is that you generally get the answer and that's it (at school anyway, probably not so much at degree) whereas with arts you can keep speculating, debating, and finding new ways of seeing things so it doesn't get dull. Psychology is definitely like that. I think my enthusiasm has returned, thanks. It just worries me that so many people appear to be/have been dissatisfied.
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    I study BSc Psychology with Neuroscience. I don't regret choosing this degree at all.

    I certainly think it's interesting that people tend to fall into 2 opposing camps 1) where physiology is glossed over in favour of a very soft subjective approach to psychology or 2) where experiences of individuals are subjected to biological reductionism. I don't see any problem in integrating approaches in order to understand more about the shades of grey that exist within the field of psychology. I have studied modules such as varied as social psychology and central nervous system pharmacology and both have their place in my future plans, in fact the area of psychology I am most interested in is 'social cognitive neuroscience'.
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    I'm studying Psychology at degree level currently and I do regret it. I chose it because at the time it sounded interesting and I was doing well in the subject at A-Level. My first year wasn't too bad (in terms of what we studied) but I've found that the only aspects of the course I really enjoy are the Biological modules. Heck, I don't even mind stats anymore compared to some of the other modules we're taught! Also, the fact that there will be (roughly) 160+ psych graduates in my year is very worrying considering the fact that most psychology postgrad courses are highly competitive. I wish I'd applied for a more science centered degree.
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    I think a big part of the problem is people who don't know where to go end up doing Psychology, under the illusion it will open more doors for them.

    You can take Psychology after never taking the subject, much less anything else relevant like Biology.

    So when people begin the course, they're full of all the media misconceptions that they're about to turn into a Derren Brown or something. (I can't name any actual Pop-Psychologists right now.)



    So perhaps they drop out when they realise they won't be able to read minds and predict moods.
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    (Original post by Itchybrain)
    I study BSc Psychology with Neuroscience. I don't regret choosing this degree at all.

    I certainly think it's interesting that people tend to fall into 2 opposing camps 1) where physiology is glossed over in favour of a very soft subjective approach to psychology or 2) where experiences of individuals are subjected to biological reductionism. I don't see any problem in integrating approaches in order to understand more about the shades of grey that exist within the field of psychology. I have studied modules such as varied as social psychology and central nervous system pharmacology and both have their place in my future plans, in fact the area of psychology I am most interested in is 'social cognitive neuroscience'.
    Good to hear. Where do you study?

    I agree with you there. In my A level course, there appears to be a determination to keep 'psychological' approaches very much separate from 'biological' approaches as if the mind and the brain are totally independent entities. It pisses me off because it leads to all sorts of logical inconsistencies.
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    (Original post by Meliae)
    Good to hear. Where do you study?

    I agree with you there. In my A level course, there appears to be a determination to keep 'psychological' approaches very much separate from 'biological' approaches as if the mind and the brain are totally independent entities. It pisses me off because it leads to all sorts of logical inconsistencies.
    I study at the University of Westminster. In my opinion, psychology can be approached from a variety of theoretical perspectives. I used to be very reductionist in my approach when I began my course, but I soon realised that seeking to neatly package human experience into the mould of biological processes lacks central coherence. The bigger picture is informed by a variety of perspectives. If you study psychology at university and dislike learning about 'soft' psychology, there is nothing to stop you from exploring your own interests. Regardless of what your lectures revolve around, doing extra reading and challenging ideas is exactly what will get you a 1st.
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    In my experience, many people who do psychology with very fixed ideas can regret it. By that I mean:

    - people who think psychology will give them A+B=C answers about complex human behaviour. (It doesn't).

    - people who think that doing an undergraduate psychology degree will be a passport to allow them to work within psychology. (Only a minority of the total ever will unfortunately, and the good ones like Latin Machine or Godspeed G who do actually stand a chance are less likely to stick around with the uncertainty of the pathways to becoming chartered).

    - people who think its going help them understand their own problems/ relationships/ issues somehow. (It won't and you would be better off spending the money on a good therapist or counsellor).

    - people who think its a doss subject. (although its simplistic at undergrad, its not fun enough and requires too much attention to be a proper doss)

    - people who are dogmatic about the world being entirely defined in a given way (be that entirely using hard objective science or entirely through a subjective, artsy way). Psychology integrates multiple perspectives and needs some flexibillity, as anyone who has run from an overrunning bio psych lession straight into a social psych one will tell you.

    Also bear in mind lots of people will regret doing it because its one of the larger courses, so there are more people to potentially have that regret.
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    (Original post by Lord Asriel)
    In my experience, many people who do psychology with very fixed ideas can regret it. By that I mean:

    - people who think psychology will give them A+B=C answers about complex human behaviour. (It doesn't).

    - people who think that doing an undergraduate psychology degree will be a passport to allow them to work within psychology. (Only a minority of the total ever will unfortunately, and the good ones like Latin Machine or Godspeed G who do actually stand a chance are less likely to stick around with the uncertainty of the pathways to becoming chartered).

    - people who think its going help them understand their own problems/ relationships/ issues somehow. (It won't and you would be better off spending the money on a good therapist or counsellor).

    - people who think its a doss subject. (although its simplistic at undergrad, its not fun enough and requires too much attention to be a proper doss)

    - people who are dogmatic about the world being entirely defined in a given way (be that entirely using hard objective science or entirely through a subjective, artsy way). Psychology integrates multiple perspectives and needs some flexibillity, as anyone who has run from an overrunning bio psych lession straight into a social psych one will tell you.

    Also bear in mind lots of people will regret doing it because its one of the larger courses, so there are more people to potentially have that regret.
    Thanks for that, Lord Asriel. Good post =) I'm feeling more confident about my decision now.
 
 
 
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