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    (Original post by Aphotic Cosmos)
    So perhaps they try being good parents rather than shifting responsibility to someone else, i.e. teachers?

    Refusing to expose children to something will not make it go away - they'll be confronted with the state of modern society at some point, and they're going to have to deal with it. Better to arm and prepare them with the knowledge to survive and thrive than experience a culture shock after years of being sheltered and kept in a homogeneous cultural environment.
    I don't want my children pressured by their fellow students to engage in activities I deem immoral and against my values. The parents have sovereignty over the home,but children are naive and impressionable hence it is imperative to at least provide them an environment where such lures are nonexistent.
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    (Original post by Installation)
    I think yes, the "give kids a choice" brigade often mistake choice for atheism.
    Atheism is a choice.
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    (Original post by Installation)
    I think yes, the "give kids a choice" brigade often mistake choice for atheism.
    And the 'give kids religious schools' brigade often mistake secularism for atheism.
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    (Original post by Pink Bullets)
    And the 'give kids religious schools' brigade often mistake secularism for atheism.
    Boo hoo, that's essentially what it is, and will most likely lead to.
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    (Original post by DJkG.1)
    They are not necessary, no.

    But I don't hate the idea of faith schools either as a lot of TSRians do.

    I go to a Catholic school myself (used to go to a State primary which had a strong CofE Christian ethos) and I'm happy that I went to these schools. I think the religious dimension, even for those who are not Christian or even those who are faithless, was beneficial for us and helped us grow up appreciating some of the deeper and finer things about social culture and even history which a secular school would have had difficulty with.

    Even now I recite pleasant Biblical verses at certain times and I'm not Christian - but what is the harm of that?

    If these schools are open to members of all faiths but choose to be centred around Christianity, or Islam, or Sikhism etc. then I see no problem with that, nor State funding of that. As for the selective nature of these schools and the benefits they exclude some from enjoying, well learn to live with it. Life isn't 100% fair and we shouldn't steam-roll over established institutions in a futile act of 'enforcing equality'.
    Have you got offers from Durham, UCL, LSE, Kings, and Cambridge for Law? What the hell.. how the hell.. HOW? :eek:
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    (Original post by taheki)
    No.

    They shouldn't be banned but they should definitely NOT be state funded. They should all be private..
    That was waht I was about to say. I have no problem with faith schools existing as independant schools. I do not overly believe religion to be a dangerous good like drugs or guns that requires regulation actually; but if it is to be supplied, I insist it be supplied by independant enterprises and not the state.
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    (Original post by Pink Bullets)
    I don't think anyone is advocating decreasing the number of schools in existence. I'm sure everyone agrees that the government has the responsibility to provide school places for all children; some of us just believe that these places shouldn't be religiously-affiliated.
    Well, no, I was answering the thread title. OP: Are faith schools necessary? Me: Yes, if there aren't enough ordinary state school places.

    I did agree with everyone else though. I do think all state schools should be secular; I was just pointing out that some people didn't have a choice. In any case, it's probably no coincidence that the C of E primary had places when the ordinary one didn't. :dontknow:
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    (Original post by Get Cape.Wear Cape.Fly.)
    The Christian faith schools that I know do not even preach Christianity. The Islamic schools that I know definitely do. All faith schools shouldn't be painted with the same brush...they're not all the same. :confused:
    I agree, we don't get forced to worship the almighty Lord above, we go to church and sing hymns but thats it. They have better discipline at Christian faith schools. I have been to a secular comprehensive, faith comprehensive and im going to a grammar school right now and the christian comp had the best teachers, best discipline, kids need discipline!!! :spank: I see more tarts and bimibos at my current school than in the other schools I have been to.
    OP you probably have never be to a faith school so you don't know what it is like.
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    School is for teaching kids facts, not teaching kids fairy tales as facts.
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    shouldnt exist, religion is poison and encouraging young naive children to believe in a certain religion is despicable.
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    Dear Sarah

    What actually is NECESSARY in life? Should be abandon all things unecessary?
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    (Original post by Get Cape.Wear Cape.Fly.)
    It's unfair for people to think that all faith schools brainwash people with the particular religion.
    I agree, the C of E school I went to was frankly not christian, we had an assembly by a vicar every week but we also had an assembly by a muslim guy every week as well. Most of the pupils if they were religious were muslim....the school was only C of E in name and not character.
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    Faith schools are fine. If i were a parent I'd be incredibly worried about sending a child to the moral-less cesspit that is a comprehensive state school. Education is not just about what they teach in the classroom. Freedom of choice!
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    (Original post by Wardy23)
    Just a name indeed. I think they're more 'attractive' to parents of a particular faith. I've got quite a few mates from a Catholic school in my area and there's a noticeable difference in the number of Christians who went there than the other schools in my area. But they don't preach and it doesn't seem like they were preached to either.
    This is the reason why my parents made me go to a catholic school.tbh i hate my school,it doesn't even feel like a catholic school,we only have mass once a term.we only pray at assembly which is once a week and on exam days.many people who go there aren't even catholic and the results are'nt very good compared to other non faith schools,the kids are always causing trouble even outside school.my point is that it's better to go to a school with good standards i.e high passrate and discipline than just go to a school just because it's your religion's institute.

    as for the original question i would say it depends because some faith schools are really good and very religious but others aren't.in my area there's one really good catholic school where they pray every day and have mass very often and there are high standards and there's a COFE school which is good as well.and then my school like i mentioned above which is really bad.
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    If all schools that had previously been faith schools has their faith status removed and had to become secular - would this mean that their standard of education would change? If they receive the same amount of money from the state, and have the same teaching the education at the school would be the same as always - regardless of their religiosity? The only thing they do differently is to offer a religious moral grounding - is this such a bad thing? Does it actually have any effect on the children/young people? Because if it doesn't - faith schools are not necessary
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    (Original post by Get Cape.Wear Cape.Fly.)
    Why are they unnecessary? It's not even like they're exclusive to one religion (especially the Christian schools). All the Catholic/Protestant schools I know are only 30% Christian and 70% other religions whereas all the Sikh and Muslim school I know decline every student of another religion. Schools like that should be banned IMO. In a Catholic school, one guy used to bring in videos and used to preach Islam to everyone non stop. WHY DID YOU GO TO A CATHOLIC SCHOOL THEN?
    Exactly.
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    (Original post by Xenopus)
    They're not necessarry, any more than are night clubs, casinos, or strip clubs, but if people want to go to them then they should have to choice of doing so.
    Kids don't have a choice where they go to school, especially those with religious parents
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    (Original post by Get Cape.Wear Cape.Fly.)
    Why are they unnecessary? It's not even like they're exclusive to one religion (especially the Christian schools). All the Catholic/Protestant schools I know are only 30% Christian and 70% other religions whereas all the Sikh and Muslim school I know decline every student of another religion. Schools like that should be banned IMO. In a Catholic school, one guy used to bring in videos and used to preach Islam to everyone non stop. WHY DID YOU GO TO A CATHOLIC SCHOOL THEN?
    Catholic schools are known for generally having a better standard of education, especially compared to other non-religious comprehensives. You'd be surprised how many parents quickly baptise their children as catholics when it's time to apply for secondary school...

    Maybe there are more muslims/sikhs in your area, hence why there's an exclusivity in these schools.
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    (Original post by Leto)
    Well, no, I was answering the thread title. OP: Are faith schools necessary? Me: Yes, if there aren't enough ordinary state school places.
    If there aren't enough ordinary state school places, then surely the answer to that is more state schools, not faith schools. :confused:
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    (Original post by Pink Bullets)
    If there aren't enough ordinary state school places, then surely the answer to that is more state schools, not faith schools. :confused:
    Well yes, that seems like a logical thing to say... If the faith schools were turned into ordinary state schools there wouldn't be a problem.
 
 
 
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