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    Hi all,

    just wondering if anyone could clarify some points for me.
    I'm doing some work on experimental technique within titrations. My teacher told me that using a more concentrated version of the solution in the burette makes the 'end-point more accurate and reduces the error in the burette'

    Why is this?

    Many thanks,
    Luke
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    (Original post by labt)
    Hi all,

    just wondering if anyone could clarify some points for me.
    I'm doing some work on experimental technique within titrations. My teacher told me that using a more concentrated version of the solution in the burette makes the 'end-point more accurate and reduces the error in the burette'

    Why is this?

    Many thanks,
    Luke
    With more concentrated solution, you would only need a smaller volume than its corresponding more dilute solution. You know sometimes, some solutions remain on the side of the burette and this(very small effect) could affect your final titre reading. I am guessing that since you would need smaller volume when using concentrated solution, this error could be minimised.
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    I'd have thought using less concentrated would be more accurate. When you titrate (depending on the equipment) your reading is usually accurate about ±0.5 or ±0.05, can't remember which. With a more concentrated solution, something like 0.05cm cubed of the stuff is a lot more of the chemical than 0.05cm of dilute solution. And the ±0.05 as a percentage (the error margin/percentage) of the titre (which will be much more with a dilute solution) will be much smallerJust a thought, may be wrong though...
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    (Original post by MrChem)
    I'd have thought using less concentrated would be more accurate. When you titrate (depending on the equipment) your reading is usually accurate about ±0.5 or ±0.05, can't remember which. With a more concentrated solution, something like 0.05cm cubed of the stuff is a lot more of the chemical than 0.05cm of dilute solution. And the ±0.05 as a percentage (the error margin/percentage) of the titre (which will be much more with a dilute solution) will be much smallerJust a thought, may be wrong though...
    I'm with you MrC...

    Titrations are carried out using the concentrations that we do for very good reasons:

    The end point is well defined and the accuracy is good. As you increase the concentration the accuracy decreases, there is more chance of 'overshooting' the endpoint.

    Also a lower value for the titre increases the error as the overall measurement inaccuracy percentage becomes larger (0.1/the measurement x 100%)
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    Checked this out and you are correct.

    Less concentrated since alarger volume needs to be used and this makes the results more accurate.
 
 
 
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